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  1. #1
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    Bum not far enough back

    I ride a 50 frame Surly LHT. I have always felt like I've got too much weight forward. Having ridden it for quite a while it seems that what I need is to get my bum back a couple of inches more while binging the bars closer. Perhaps a smaller frame and a different type of seat post?

  2. #2
    Senior Member juggleaddict's Avatar
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    is your back at a comfy angle?

    are you willing to be more stretched out?

    are the bars about level with the saddle?

    what's your inseam?

    What stem size and angle are you using?

  3. #3
    Senior Member Cyclebum's Avatar
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    I had the same problem on a 50 cm df I used to tour on. Fixed it with a forward facing seat post. Also installed stem risers and an adjustable stem to get the bars where I wanted them. The bike was too big from the outset. Or more likely, I'm just not poportioned right for a standard frame. Fixed all problems with the bent, tho I do still ride the df occasionally, mostly to remind myself why I don't.
    The bicycle is one of the great inventions of mankind. Delights children, challenges young men to feats of daring, and turns old men into boys again.--Me

  4. #4
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    46cm

    Last edited by 10 Wheels; 03-12-13 at 08:43 AM.
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by juggleaddict View Post
    is your back at a comfy angle?

    are you willing to be more stretched out?

    are the bars about level with the saddle?

    what's your inseam?

    What stem size and angle are you using?
    I don't think the angle of my back is a problem. I have butterfly bars with the ends towards the rider, so I can cruise in an upright position.
    The bars are close to seat level.
    My inseam is 76.
    I'm not sure of my stem angle it looks like it's about 45d's.

  6. #6
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Nitto-Rivendale seat post has the Most set back.. it's hand made nickel plated chromoly steel with lugs and stuff
    and just made in 27.2 in Japan

  7. #7
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    This seems like a strange problem. What makes you feel like you are too far forward? What area of your body feels too far forward?

    I'd assume if you want the bars closer than they are, either your back is uncomfortable or your arms would be too far extended. If you feel to far forward, then it seems like that would either be an aspect of the frame being to small or a short stem (accompanied with a position too upright, or cramped in the cockpit region with very bent arms, or too much "on top of" the front wheel), or in a weird sitting position relative to the cranks (which I'm pretty sure can only be solved with reposition the saddle or a setback seatpost, not so much the frame).

    Also, if you're not used to riding road bikes than that could be the issue. I'm not an expert on frame geometry, but Cruiser style bikes have the cranks way forward of the seat, and I'd assume hybrid and comfort bikes more so than tourers.

    If you can't pinpoint why you feel too far forward, I'd suggest bringing it to a shop experienced in bike fit. Its a difficult thing to try and diagnose not in person.

  8. #8
    Senior Member juggleaddict's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by groceries View Post
    I don't think the angle of my back is a problem. I have butterfly bars with the ends towards the rider, so I can cruise in an upright position.
    The bars are close to seat level.
    My inseam is 76.
    I'm not sure of my stem angle it looks like it's about 45d's.
    45 degrees is about the range you want, but it's largely a preference, basically you wouldn't want to change anything that changed your back angle if it's where you want it. . . though there's some fluff there.

    I have the same inseam and I ride a 52. It may very well be that the frame is a tad too small for your taste. I would try moving the seat back on your current seatpost to see how it feels, and the trying different stem/seatpost combos as others have mentioned.

    I'm certainly no expert in fit though. It would be awesome to get some help with it at a more professional shop, but they will give you looks sometimes when you go in a shop like that and ask for help with a bike you didn't buy from them O:-)

  9. #9
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    I think it is simple body geometry that with my feet on the pedals and bum on the seat my centre of gravity is over balanced. If I could change the angle of the seat tube a few degrees I would be in a more comfortable semi squat. I've got proportionalll long legs with a short but broad torso (and long arms).
    At this stage I think I would like to try out a 46 frame with a set back seat post such as (Nitto-Rivendale seat post- thanks). The old fashioned bikes had an "L" shaped seat post and a lot of adjustment.

  10. #10
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Got pictures , to show your issue? I cannot help fit bikes over the internet,

    .. dont you know where a bike shop is?

  11. #11
    GO BIG RED norwood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by groceries View Post
    I think it is simple body geometry that with my feet on the pedals and bum on the seat my centre of gravity is over balanced. If I could change the angle of the seat tube a few degrees I would be in a more comfortable semi squat. I've got proportionalll long legs with a short but broad torso (and long arms).
    At this stage I think I would like to try out a 46 frame with a set back seat post such as (Nitto-Rivendale seat post- thanks). The old fashioned bikes had an "L" shaped seat post and a lot of adjustment.
    FWIW The symptoms you describe are typically the result of trying to ride a too small a frame not the other way around. But without knowing your body measurements it's nearly impossible to give accurate advice.
    1996 Bianchi Veloce
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    Hmm... common practice is you set the saddle fore/aft and height with respect to the bottom bracket and then adjust the height and reach of the handlebars. Adjusting the saddle fore/aft in order to change weight distribution could set you up for knee problems (assuming it's in the right place for you knees right now, which of course, is currently unknown).

    I would start with a bike fit, and be open to moving/switching saddles & stems.
    ...

  13. #13
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    Sit on your bike with the pedal forward,crank arm level to the ground.Your knee should be straight above the pedal,more or less.Once you have that set,change your handlebar setup so that it is comfortable for you.

    If your knee is still forward of the pedal with an offset seat post,the frame is too small.As frames get bigger,the seat is set back farther from the crank,unless the seat tube is straight up and down.....aren't many frames like that....

    Seat forward gives you more power,seat back helps bike handling.

    Front of knee hurts,raise seat:Back of knee hurts,lower seat.
    Last edited by Booger1; 03-14-13 at 12:16 PM.
    Everything should be as simple as possible...But not more so.---Albert Einstein

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