Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 27 of 27
  1. #26
    Every day a winding road spinnaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    2005 Cannondale SR500, 2008 Trek 7.3 FX, Jamis Aurora
    Posts
    4,297
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A touring buddy of mine is 66. I am 54. He can easily kick my butt in the saddle (and out of it too, he is like 5'7" and all muscle). I am in the best shape of my life. While my buddy is in much better shape, I can still do things now that I could not do 20 years ago. Granted that 20 years ago had I started to get myself in shape it would have happened a lot quicker but I didn't.

    Several years ago I was inspired by an old man sailing a Laser. It was off of Antigua. I don't know if you ever sailed a Laser before but it is not an easy feat. I looked at him and said I wanted to be that guy when I get older, I want some young punk saying "hey look at the old guy", referring to me on a Laser.
    "The world is a dangerous place to live, not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it."

    Albert Einstein

  2. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Philly
    My Bikes
    IF SCJ SE, Surly LHT, BikeFriday NWT, Cannondale M300, Raleigh 700
    Posts
    3,802
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by SuperTrouper View Post
    Though I've never done an extended tour, it's something I'd like to do. As to your question about having money your old age, my justification is that you're going to stop working at some point and have to live off the money you've saved up. Why not "retire" for one year when you're younger, whether you're 25, 35, 45, or whatever? You'll probably get as much, if not more, enjoyment from that one year sabbatical than when you "really" retire.

    You'll miss out on some income and even if you work an extra year you'll lose on the time-value of money. But life is about more than having money in your old age. "You can't take it with you", they say.
    That's the way I looked at it when I took time off starting at age 34. I would not trade the experiences I had during my time off for the money and career advancement I sacrificed. It's not even a close call. I recommend doing it if you can make it work. It takes sacrifice, but in the end it will likely be worth it.


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •