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  1. #1
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    Surly LHT Size/Wheel Questions

    I am looking at building up a Surly LHT. My first complete build. I am hoping to use it for some light touring (3-5 days). My biggest concern is that I am unsure of which frame size to buy. No LBS has one in stock, let alone built up. I currently ride an 04 poprad (cross bike) in a 52cm which fits great. Previously, I rode a 54cm Cannondale r400 that I actually thought felt small. Does anyone have any advice or better yet know a bike that has similar geometry that would be common (say a trek 520?) that I could check out and compare. Also, what are the benefits/tradeoffs of going for the 56cm (assuming I could reasonably fit it) which comes with 700cc wheels versus 26"? So far the best price I have seen is ~350 at spicercycle. Anything better? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member late's Avatar
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    Hi,
    when you say lite touring, do you mean no tent,stay in motels?
    There are lots of bikes to chose from, if you mean at that price, there isn't much.
    There are ready made bikes like the trek 520. What is your budget?Finding the right fit can be tricky, often the length of the top tube is critical.

  3. #3
    Senior Member smurfy's Avatar
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    I've talked to the LBS in the recent past who carries Surly and they suggested going one size up on the Surly road frames because they have lower BB's (I think that's what they said, anyway).
    "You handle it like you handle a bicycle" - Jacques Rosay, Airbus A380 test pilot

  4. #4
    Slow and unsteady
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    Have you looked at the geometry for the LHT listed on the surly website?

    http://www.surlybikes.com/longhaul.html

    At the very least you could compare the measurements of your current bike to that of the LHT frames, and go from there.

  5. #5
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    I don't know how much it'll help, but I'm shoping for a surly LHT as well and have been having the same test ride problem. The best solution I've found so far is a fellow at a local shop told me that one of their employees rides a surly steamroller that I can test-out which, according to him, is essentially the same frame as the LHT minus the braze-ons.

  6. #6
    Steel is Real. markw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clinto
    I don't know how much it'll help, but I'm shoping for a surly LHT as well and have been having the same test ride problem. The best solution I've found so far is a fellow at a local shop told me that one of their employees rides a surly steamroller that I can test-out which, according to him, is essentially the same frame as the LHT minus the braze-ons.
    Completely different geometries. Check the website, and then get a metric tape measurement and compare to your current ride. That's what I did. The LHT is comparable to the Riv atlantis, low bb, long chainstays for panniers.

    Mark

  7. #7
    senile member
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    Quote Originally Posted by markw
    Check the website, and then get a metric tape measurement and compare to your current ride. That's what I did.
    that´s what i did too. how to choose a size

  8. #8
    Enamoured of bicycles Bizikleto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by descartes
    [snipped...] what are the benefits/tradeoffs of going for the 56cm [...snipped...] with 700cc wheels versus 26"? [...snipped]
    Hi, 700c is slightly better for racing and light commuting and touring due to their higher rotating momentum (wheel tends to turn by itself more easily once overcome the initial spin inertia). When I say light, I mean light, that is, just a small bag with the basic stuff. Beyond that weight limit, well into full laden, self-supported touring, 26" wheels (559 cm rims) are better because they are stronger (all the component of the wheel being equal in quality compared to 700c) and at the speeds that one will reach in a full laden rig, one won't take advantage of the higher rotating momentum of a 700c wheel.

    All the best.
    Antonio.
    Doubt is usually the beginning of wisdom. Scott Peck.
    There is no bigger signal of ignorance than that of believing impossible the unexplainable. S. Bilard

  9. #9
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    Thanks all. I appreciate the suggestions. I have compared the numbers but it is so hard for me to buy a bike on paper. I will look out for a Riv Atlantis- however they may be tough to track down as well.

    Bizikleto/Antonio- Thank you for your response. That is exactly the info I wanted and it makes lots of sense.

  10. #10
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    26" wheel have the advantage when you want a fat tyre over rough ground, and when you need spares in many parts of the world where 700c is not stocked.
    700c is good for camping on roads and hostel riding on trails, they is not weak, but for the same spoke count, smaller wheels are stronger.

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