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  1. #1
    Friend of Jimmy K naisme's Avatar
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    Okay, so I've lost my job. Not that it is breaking me up or anything, I am really sort of relieved that I no longer work where I was working. I have had this recurring dream/nightmare of riding to the four corners. I have read a lot of the on-line journals, where folks share their adventures, and how things just came together and they didn't have to think about it too hard, and got up one morning loaded the bike and road off. That's a little Forrest Gumpish. But the old brain goes right to let's load the Trek 7500 up and go. I have all the stuff to do the trip. I even have sort of a bankroll to do it. Part of the fun of a trip like this isn't affording it, it is how to do it, and keep doing it.
    Lurking here I know a bit more than when I first started posting here. I still have a few questions, like what was the biggest trial you faced on the road? Like the loneliness, the tediousness of a week into headwinds in flat Nebraska, or getting hit by bears in Yellowstone, or the drivers in Tennesee, or not showering in a week.
    I'm not ready to just head off, there are a couple job interviews this week that could turn into something, one with a bike shop! There is also what to do with my stuff before I head off, and where and how exactly I am going to take this trip, it that is really what I'm going to do...
    "I will remain the stranger who came from a faraway land." Lance Armstrong

    "The more you drive, the less intelligent you become." Miller "Repo Man"

  2. #2
    Quietly Desperate Kodama's Avatar
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    Well I say, go for it. There really isn't much on the road, especially in American that you can't handle. The loneliness might be an issue, but really it is up to you how much you interact with other people. One thing to be ware of IMO is the compulsion to just press on. You got to get off the road often, walk around, meet people or the cycling trip will reveal little more then the views you can see from the road. The advantage of the bicycle is that you can be on and off it in a few minutes, you can go down paths, ride it across that field to look at the bluff. Don't worry about the mileage, if you are doing much more than 50 miles in a day, then you aren't really spending the time to see the country.
    "The true traveller is without goal, it is the absence of goals which creates the ultimate traveller."
    - Gao Xingjian 'Soul Mountain'

  3. #3
    Hooked on Touring
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    Naisme -

    Part of the attraction of a long bike trip is setting aside all the worldly things. I would hate to calculate all the money I've spent (the smaller portion, since I bike cheap) and all the money that I have not earned (the larger portion, by far). What have I received in return?? More than money can buy. I first biked for the scenery and the achievement. Then I biked to meet people. Now I bike just to bike - the experience itself. Kinda like a Tibetan prayer-wheel.

    Don't sweat the details - they can be worked out. Sublet your apartment - put your stuff in somebody's attic or storage (It's a good time to have a yard sale and a trip to the dump.) - have somebody look after Fido or Fluffy - and go!

    Best - J

    PS If the job don't come thru - check this out - You are welcome to come along.
    http://JohnnyGunn.crazyguyonabike.com
    Last edited by jamawani; 03-14-05 at 02:30 AM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Dougmt's Avatar
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    One thing that would worry me about a deal like this is that constant nagging in the back of my mind saying "what are you gonna do when your done touring." For me to do something like this I would need to have some sort of a plan... something I knew I would be doing when I was done. I can say this after traveling the Country for 3 years in a MH with the wife and 2 kids. We lost our business and just hit the road... but ALWAYS in the back of my mind I wonder what we are gonna do when we are done... and it's detracted MUCH from our experience. I worry about **** too much so maybe it's just me LOL... I would do it though, don't get me wrong, just have some kind of a plan.. something you can tell yourself... "hey, have fun while I'm doing this and when I'm done I'm gonna do THIS" You may not end up doing it of course... it may not even matter...
    D

  5. #5
    Senior Member Dougmt's Avatar
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    Holy **** Johnny.... Your diary on crazyguy is frickin AMAZING!!!!!!! I'm not sure what I'm gonna be doing this midsummer but if there is anyway I can join you for a couple of days.. maybe even a week or two I'd do it in a heartbeat!!!!! You have a good eye for a photograph too.... nice site
    D

  6. #6
    Friend of Jimmy K naisme's Avatar
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    Well, the situation is this, I am not married, I have a cat, all the stuff I have in the apartment can go back on the junk pile. I have big van that I can sell and take the money and a bike and get off the grid for a while. I have the tent the panniers, the bike with the racks, the stove, the fuel bottles. I think the one thing that I would like that I don't have is a water filter/purifyier. My fear is that once I get out there I will find that I will continue just to do it. Sort of like Forrest when at the ocean, he turned around and headed back.
    I don't know where or how it will end, but it could be fun to just ride, the tibetian wheel thing. I love the bike, I love travel, and then there is writing about it. Crazy guy on a bike is a great site, that's where I got my inspiration. I forgot whose journal it was that I read, but a woman did the ride across country on a folder. That's quite an adventure. Ken Keiffer's site was also one of inspiration. I started reading those when I went to France a few years ago, and did a short tour there.
    I have a lot of thoughts and wonder what is going to be next. If I take up the trail, would I be able to sit down like Least Heat Moon, and write a book as fun as Blue Highways, or Studs Trekel and Work? That is sort of the goal, at the end to wind up in some relative's basement guest room with my laptop, and write about the trip.
    Oh and my land lord has said he'd take the cat.
    "I will remain the stranger who came from a faraway land." Lance Armstrong

    "The more you drive, the less intelligent you become." Miller "Repo Man"

  7. #7
    Immoderator KrisPistofferson's Avatar
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    Cats are like furniture. Give it to somebody and go tour.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bikeforums
    Your rights end where another poster's feelings begin.

  8. #8
    Friend of Jimmy K naisme's Avatar
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    jamawani, what a trip!
    "I will remain the stranger who came from a faraway land." Lance Armstrong

    "The more you drive, the less intelligent you become." Miller "Repo Man"

  9. #9
    Conquer Cancer rider Boudicca's Avatar
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    Cats are not like furniture.
    Zero gallons to the mile

  10. #10
    Hooked on Touring
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    Uh-Ooohhhh -

    I suspect this might become a cat thread. But of my three beasts, Stinkums is totally motivated by adventure - she wants out first thing in the morning - Big Wu is my large economy model who is totally motivated by food - and Betsy needs constant petting and affection. So, my vote is that they're not like furniture.

    Best - J

  11. #11
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krispistoferson
    Cats are like furniture.
    Careful there, Krispi.
    Dead last finish is better than did not finish and infinitely better than did not start.

  12. #12
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
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    Now, a serious answer. A number of years ago, I was somewhat at loose ends and decided to take six months to tour Europe. All I knew at the beginning was that I had a bike, some cycling gear, and a ticket to Athens in March and a ticket home from Ireland in September.

    The tour turned out to be perhaps the single best decision I ever made. I brought a camera, kept a journal and did in fact sell some stories and photos to some magazines. I later became a professional writer and photographer, and that's what I've been doing ever since. I had no clue that this was going to be the way it would work out. If I hadn't hit the road on my bike, I'd probably be selling insurance or running a car wash right now.

    One thing about Europe (as opposed to America), there are zillions of hostels, which, if you're on your own, are a godsend. They're cheap. You can usually camp outside for half the price and then use the indoor cooking, eating, showering and socializing facilities. In addition, camping is allowed (or at least widely accepted) in places like public parks, soccer fields, people's yards, etc. In fact, there's a good chance people will, often enough, invite you into their homes for the night. It happened to me more times than I can remember.

    If you've ever had a hankering to see the Acropolis, the Collesium, the Alps, the Eiffel Tower, while getting to know an entirely different culture, I recommend considering Europe.

    Wherever you go, grab the chance now, before you get saddled down with a mortgage, kids, etc. I can't imagine that you'll regret it. Just make sure your cat has a good home.
    Dead last finish is better than did not finish and infinitely better than did not start.

  13. #13
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Last September I quit the job I had for quite a number of years ... sold, gave away, tossed, and packed up my stuff, dropped it off in my parent's basement ... and flew to Australia with my bicycle to tour for 3 months.

    I still have a few questions, like what was the biggest trial you faced on the road?

    1. It happened a bit too fast. I didn't realize the magnitude of the departure factor and spent the month of September rushing around in a panic trying to get everything done. As a result, I ended up getting rid of a lot more stuff than I'd planned on (which was tough for me - security stuff), and in the chaos, I had very little time to keep up my training, and no time to take practice runs with my bicycle and panniers to weed out all the things I really didn't need to take with me.

    2. I took WAY too much stuff, and then after all the heart-break of getting rid of so much stuff just before I left, I had to leave behind (in Sydney) a whole bunch of the stuff I had brought with me shortly after I started the tour.

    3. I wasn't prepared for the style of touring my cycling partner had in mind. He is a "press on" type of guy who wanted to cover a certain distance every day and over some of the toughest terrain while I had in mind a slower more relaxed pace. I spent a good part of the tour in a state of exhaustion.

    If I were to do it all over again, I'd take the time to make sure everything back home was settled (the chaos I'd left behind was constantly on my mind); I'd pack a lot differently and take the time to go on some practice rides/short tours with the load so that I could work out the bugs (thus saving myself some extra stress, work, and the money I spent mailing various things home along the way); and I'd ride at my own pace so that I could really enjoy the whole thing.

    You sound like you're at a good time to do something like this ... think about it ... and start preparing soon even if you don't plan to hit the road for a while.

  14. #14
    Older I get, Better I was velonomad's Avatar
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    just sell you stuff and go. I did it three times ,twice on a bike across the country. once around the country in a old Volvo for nearly a year with a witch(wiccan) named judy. Each time I came back and put things back together within a few months. This time of Year I would suggest starting in Southern California and working your way northeast to Maine

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    I'm actually planning the same thing. Gonna sell 'donation' brochures and have a photographic journal website with a donate button. See if I can't do it started on less than a thousand, and almost self-sustained the whole way.

    I figure, having a set of tee shirts that say something along the likes of "In the Footsteps of Jack Kerouac and Heinz Stucke" in the front, and "This Acolyte of the Road asks of your help" or something shorter and bigger with the same effect. However, I don't know if anyone has tried this in the USA yet, and I heard Heinz Stucke (http://www.bikechina.com/ct-heinzstucke1z.html) never really did try it in the USA, although that didn't stop people stealing from in the USA when he did go through (hitchhiking).

    So, good luck, and maybe we'll meet on the road somewhere and trade notes.

    -Dio

  16. #16
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    DO IT
    The positive influences that will enter your life once you start will FAR outweigh any negatives
    A job when and if you return?? A minor poblem plus you may find someplace to live that is far better than where you are now living
    Lonliness? Smile a lot whenever and whereever you stop. Talk to every one. Bicycles bring out the curiousity factor in most people.
    Weather?Alter your schedule so a down day if its raining, or worse.isn't a minus mileage day
    Keep a rich, rich treat in the bottom of your bags to eat when things look kinda bleak. For me its an apple with REAL P-Nut butter,or M+Ms if I'm in the country... and when in a city if I can locate a Whole Foods Store, or Wild Oats Store REAL chocolate from Belguim.
    Start living out of your bags a month before you leave, best way to cut down on things and weight. Sleep in the tent and sleeping bag
    Pets are the biggest problem. It breaks my heart when I have to leave him with friends, and it breaks their hearts when I return to reclaim him.
    Unusual, unfamiliar situations become the norm.During a real "trash mover and gully washer", I took shelter under an overhang of what was a "heavy biker" bar and was eating something when some guys came out and said to bring my bike and self inside out of the rain. So I did,one of the best rest stops of my trip,They were friendly, curious as kittens,about my bike and gear and insisted that I share their pizza

    Starting off the first morning was the hardest part until I put my mind in the frame that this was the start of a NEW day and time. Now the first push off with a loaded bike means I can head anywhere I want to go

    I was stopped once in a rest area in the upper midwest when hi-way patrol man stopped and started chatting with me.He said he often did it because cyclists seemed to him to be the most relaxed travelers he had a chance to meet, and allowed him to put his mind in neutral for a short time. Few things fazed them, and obviously were not in a hurry.
    The oddest thing about a long bike trip is meeting folks who think riders are destitute and offer to buy something for you to eat or offer a few bux, "to help you out".Lunch I ocassionally accept, but the money I always refuse.Many seem to equate a bike as being a bike, you know like their kids have, instead of a fine piece of machinery when loaded as mine is when traveling being worth a few 1000$

    Your trip, when you do it will be the most rewearding thing you ever accomplish

  17. #17
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    I agree. just do it. I know I am. I lost my job on feb. 14 ,2005 I started riding a whole lot after that and plan to leave next mon 3-21-05 . I am not sure how far I can go but the first leg is a little over 200 miles to the wifes aunts house. if that goes well I'll backtrack to the northern teir and head west. I dont have any money to do this,and intend to work my way across. ok I lied I have around $500 to start ,but i figure most larger cities have day labor type places, or I could fall back on my farm hand skills.most farmers will feed you and pay you a bit for cleaning out the farring house on a hog farm,if you dont mind that kinda work.

    I have been wanting to do this since I was 16. now I am 33 and decided that there cant be a good enough reason not to do it. I am still overweight,unemployed,basically have no money, married with pets. right now I have no reponsabilities that cant be put off for a couple month's. or longer if she dont like it!.

    good luck with the job situation and make sure you enjoy what you do,no matter what that is
    "When a man lies, he murders some part of the world"

    God Bless Chris LeDoux. R.I.P. 1948-2005

  18. #18
    Senior Member
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    I saw you post in the fixie/ss forum and remembered reading this with great interest last year.

    endless summer new jersey to mexico on a single speed
    "When a man lies, he murders some part of the world"

    God Bless Chris LeDoux. R.I.P. 1948-2005

  19. #19
    Friend of Jimmy K naisme's Avatar
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    Man, I don't know. I love this idea. I am not really sure that it is the idea of the ride, or just the romance of the road. I tend to be a romantic, and Keroac really held interest for me, but so does Sommerset Maugham, the Razor's Edge, is a great follow the road less traveled by story. It is too bad it seemed cheapened by Bill Murray's portrayal.
    I have a couple irons in the fire. The day before I got fired, a bike shop I'd sent a resume to, called to set up an interview, that's this week. And my part time job is suggesting that I might come back full time. That's all going on in the back of my head, while I sit and read books on traveling, hiking, getting off the grid. I sort of feel like I'm on the edge of the cliff looking into the abyss, and wonder is it safe to jump. Of course posting here I will get the answers I hope to hear, DO IT. And we all know how difficult it is, to just do it, yet it just sits there eating at me. It's been eating at me for a long time, 16? Yeah that's about right, and life has always seemed to get in the way, and yet it is also that very thing that I long to explore on the bike. I probably won't be happy until it is saited. I'm 47 and I have always wanted to go off and do this. I did it with my family as a kid in a station wagon, with a futon mat to sleep on. We did summer car tours of the south, saw all the Civil War Battlefields. And my grandparents did the same thing. But some how I can't see this bike thing as a viable way of touring, like it can't be successful unless there are comforts of home with me, a bed, a shower, food, checking account, cell phone, a pay check reminding me that I am underpaid and over taxed. And what will I do if I'm bored, respoke my wheels?
    I have a couple months to think this out and figure out if I really want to head off or not. I appreciate all the advice. I don't know why I'm putting it off, but I am. Funny though, I woke this morning and rather than get out and work on getting a job, I sat around the apartment fooling around until I could go get my check at my part time job.
    I have expressed this desire with friends, and they have said they are jealous. that's not a bikg help. I think in a way I am looking for someone to talk me out of this.
    "I will remain the stranger who came from a faraway land." Lance Armstrong

    "The more you drive, the less intelligent you become." Miller "Repo Man"

  20. #20
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    naisme, why don't you plan to go for a short tour and see how it goes - plan something for a few weeks, or a month, or so. It's not so long that you've got to uproot your entire life, and it will give you a good idea if you actually like touring or not. I don't know if you've mentioned anywhere, but have you ever done any bicycle touring? If not, go for a long weekend, or a week first.

    See, the idea of touring is romantic ... but touring itself has moments that are far from romantic. There are those times where you're in a cold, driving rain with nothing to look forward to but trying to set up a wet tent and get a few hours of sleep in a damp sleeping bag. Or those times when the sun has set and you're still out in the middle of nowhere with no sign of civilization (and food!) in sight. Or those times when you've crashed and injured yourself and you've got only what you've brought with you to stave off infection for a couple days till you get to civilization. That's all a part of a long, long tour.

    Of course, on the other hand ... there's something to be said for swimming in a tropical ocean while everyone else is slaving away at their desks back home in the middle of winter ...


    And what will I do if I'm bored, respoke my wheels?

    If you ride the pace I did on my recent tour, you won't be bored! It was all I could do to help set up camp and eat before collapsing into bed to sleep.

  21. #21
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    Naisme - Lots of folks here cheering you on... touring is great. BUT...

    Only *you* know if it's the right thing for you. I could relate my own experience of stepping off the treadmill, and believe me, if you give me half a chance I will. However, you write "I think in a way I am looking for someone to talk me out of this." But you're also looking for people to say "DO IT." Are you looking for permission, or a reassurance that it will all work out? Look inside. Advice of strangers on the internet is not going to steer you where you need to go. If you have good friends, listening to what *you say to them* about your decision making process might help you decide. Maybe you know in your heart of hearts, but you don't like the answer. I bet you know yourself enough to know how to figure it out - are you a baby-step-taker? A deep-end-jumper?

    Loneliness and boredom? Headwinds? Scary drivers? Bears? That stuff can happen, but for me, anyway, worrying about it is way worse than dealing with it. You may find great personal growth in overcoming your fears. Or you may find great discomfort. Or both. I found bike touring to be an amazing learning experience.

    Want all the comforts of home? Well, how much do you want them? There's a time-money trade off... you can buy as much of that stuff as you want, but the more you spend the sooner you'll have to get a job. Bed/shower/hot meal every night? Stay in motels. Want to stay on the road forever? You'll need to conserve $, might have to free camp and eat beans and rice, learn how to dumpster dive. Everyone as a different price point, different stuff that's important to them in terms of comfort.

    To answer your original question, I guess the biggest trial was that I got tired of every conversation being a first conversation. It's wonderful to meet so many new people, but there is a lack of depth of relationship that becomes wearing. But your biggest trial will likely be something else.

    good luck with your decision...

    Anna
    PS, iodine tablets are way cheaper and lighter than a water filter... only had to use them a couple of times on my XC trip. I was road-based though - if you are going off road/wilderness, that would be different.

  22. #22
    In Memory of One Cool Cat Blackberry's Avatar
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    The hardest part of a big change like a long bike tour isn't the rain, or the headwinds. It's now. Trying to choose you're path. Once you make a commitment and you're on your way, that's when you you feel empowered and energized. I agree with Valygrl. It's you're trip and you're decision. And I'm just a stranger on the Internet, pencil pusher in an office. But I have been in you're place and a part of me wants you to experience the good things I did. Whatever you decide, good luck!
    Dead last finish is better than did not finish and infinitely better than did not start.

  23. #23
    X-Large Member Istanbul_Tea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by naisme
    Man, I don't know. I love this idea. I think in a way I am looking for someone to talk me out of this.
    Honestly? You've already decided to not go. This is just public hedging... you're looking for reasons to validate your decision- yep, the one that you've already made... and that's to stay at home.

    You wanted some truth & honesty... ya got it.

    PS... That's just it if you think about it... you love the IDEA of it but the reality is a different deal altogether.

    If you were going to go... there would have been no post from you at all... you'd be 210 miles down the road by now.

    Not being a hard@ss about this or you... just cutting through the thick haze of reality vs. fantasy... truth vs. dream.

  24. #24
    Stand For Something mntbikedude's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by naisme
    Man, I don't know. I love this idea. I am not really sure that it is the idea of the ride, or just the romance of the road. I tend to be a romantic, and Keroac really held interest for me, but so does Sommerset Maugham, the Razor's Edge, is a great follow the road less traveled by story. It is too bad it seemed cheapened by Bill Murray's portrayal.
    I have a couple irons in the fire. The day before I got fired, a bike shop I'd sent a resume to, called to set up an interview, that's this week. And my part time job is suggesting that I might come back full time. That's all going on in the back of my head, while I sit and read books on traveling, hiking, getting off the grid. I sort of feel like I'm on the edge of the cliff looking into the abyss, and wonder is it safe to jump. Of course posting here I will get the answers I hope to hear, DO IT. And we all know how difficult it is, to just do it, yet it just sits there eating at me. It's been eating at me for a long time, 16? Yeah that's about right, and life has always seemed to get in the way, and yet it is also that very thing that I long to explore on the bike. I probably won't be happy until it is saited. I'm 47 and I have always wanted to go off and do this. I did it with my family as a kid in a station wagon, with a futon mat to sleep on. We did summer car tours of the south, saw all the Civil War Battlefields. And my grandparents did the same thing. But some how I can't see this bike thing as a viable way of touring, like it can't be successful unless there are comforts of home with me, a bed, a shower, food, checking account, cell phone, a pay check reminding me that I am underpaid and over taxed. And what will I do if I'm bored, respoke my wheels?
    I have a couple months to think this out and figure out if I really want to head off or not. I appreciate all the advice. I don't know why I'm putting it off, but I am. Funny though, I woke this morning and rather than get out and work on getting a job, I sat around the apartment fooling around until I could go get my check at my part time job.
    I have expressed this desire with friends, and they have said they are jealous. that's not a bikg help. I think in a way I am looking for someone to talk me out of this.
    Well this is what happened to me in 2002 my then 16 year old son and I decided to ride our bikes down the Oregon Coast it was an incredible exsperience. We really didn't know what we were doing but we learned as we went. This past summer we decided to start in Canada and ride to the California border. All I can say is I remember thinking that if I didn't have a family to have to provide for that I would just sell everything and live on my bike. Don't mis-understand I love having a family and providing for them. But most of our lives are spent buying things, maintaining things, insuring things, housing things things things we live in "things" hell.

    On a bike you get rid of all the "things", it is this wonderfully liberating feeling. I believe a bike trek would allow a chance to clear your head and get a new perspective of what you want to do in your life. Now regarding the comforts of home, you have all of those they are just simpler. I love my cozy little tent, you can bring your cell phone just don't turn it on all the time. You may want to try the Pacific Coast as a first tour as it is really set up to do this with campsites and showers evenly paced. Being bored, what are you thinking everyday is an adventure. Being lonely? Well I did have people riding with me and that was fun. But I liked riding on my own, being on a bike people tend to want to talk to you and find out about your trip. I found people treated me like a super hero. Yes the life of a biker is truly the good life. You need to stop with the worrying and get out and do this.

    I'm 47 as well, my bike treks have just been one of many great adventures. We were watching our slides with our kids the other night it was of when my wife and I were first married and we took backpacks and headed off to the south pacific for 4 weeks. Hitch hiking, sleeping on the deck of freightships, sleeping on the beach, traveling to such cool places as Tonga, Cook Islands, New Zealand ect. Later that night my youngest was laying by me and says, dad you have done so many cool things how were you able to do it". My answer was this, I said Mark most people are always saying someday I'm going to do such and such, but the somedays never comes. I've never allowed the somedays to ever stop me from just doing it.

    MBD

  25. #25
    Very Senior Member MikeR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by naisme
    Well, the situation is this, I am not married, I have a cat, all the stuff I have in the apartment can go back on the junk pile. I have big van that I can sell and take the money and a bike and get off the grid for a while. I have the tent the panniers, the bike with the racks, the stove, the fuel bottles. I think the one thing that I would like that I don't have is a water filter/purifyier. My fear is that once I get out there I will find that I will continue just to do it. Sort of like Forrest when at the ocean, he turned around and headed back.
    I don't know where or how it will end, but it could be fun to just ride, the tibetian wheel thing. I love the bike, I love travel, and then there is writing about it. Crazy guy on a bike is a great site, that's where I got my inspiration. I forgot whose journal it was that I read, but a woman did the ride across country on a folder. That's quite an adventure. Ken Keiffer's site was also one of inspiration. I started reading those when I went to France a few years ago, and did a short tour there.
    I have a lot of thoughts and wonder what is going to be next. If I take up the trail, would I be able to sit down like Least Heat Moon, and write a book as fun as Blue Highways, or Studs Trekel and Work? That is sort of the goal, at the end to wind up in some relative's basement guest room with my laptop, and write about the trip.
    Oh and my land lord has said he'd take the cat.
    Oh for God sakes, GO!!! Go - before they get the shackles back on you. Take it from me - I'm 55 years old. There are very few times in life when you have the freedom and oportunity to take off and live for the moment. Go now while you still can! You will never regret it.

    "Live each season as it passes; breathe the air, drink the drink, taste the fruit, and resign yourself to the influences of each." Henry David Thoreau
    It's better to cycle through life than to drive by it.

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