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-   -   LEZYNE Travel Floor Drive vs LEZYNE Micro Floor Drive? (http://www.bikeforums.net/touring/934287-lezyne-travel-floor-drive-vs-lezyne-micro-floor-drive.html)

wheelinthai 02-15-14 05:56 AM

LEZYNE Travel Floor Drive vs LEZYNE Micro Floor Drive?
 
Any one here has experience with one, or both? I prefer the larger Travel Floor Drive, and wonder if it's worth it to carry such a large pump on a trip. I check my tyre pressure every morning. The Micro Floor Drive is a hair more expensive at LBS.

fietsbob 02-15-14 10:45 AM

link to both and there can be a feature match comparison for those who own neither.

At home I Still use my 30 year old Silca track pump p/v or s/v the Medai with a thumb lock.


I got a Zefal dial tire gage decades ago .. on tour I check the pressure with it..

the pump is just a pump .. W/O a built in gage...

their floor pump (different model) is on the floor At the LBS, here, for all to use.. .
may also be one at yours to try out.

On the bike , touring I got a long frame fit pump..

shorties .. for JRA around town they go in the bag hidden(in carradice bag) or removed.

njkayaker 02-15-14 11:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wheelinthai (Post 16497664)
Any one here has experience with one, or both? I prefer the larger Travel Floor Drive, and wonder if it's worth it to carry such a large pump on a trip. I check my tyre pressure every morning. The Micro Floor Drive is a hair more expensive at LBS.

What tire pressure are you looking to achieve? How do you check your tire pressure? With a separate gauge? How often do you find you need or add air? Every morning?

http://www.lezyne.com/en/products/fl...c-travel-drive

Seems awfully large and not easy to carry on the bike. Lyzene doesn't seem to expect that anybody would ride with this pump. A real "frame" pump might be easier to carry.

http://www.lezyne.com/en/micro-floor-drive-hv-hvg

Probably larger than I'd carry but, of the two, more reasonable to carry on a tour (where you might be concerned about reducing weight or space).

I use a smaller Lyzene pump.

VT_Speed_TR 02-15-14 05:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wheelinthai (Post 16497664)
Any one here has experience with one, or both? I prefer the larger Travel Floor Drive, and wonder if it's worth it to carry such a large pump on a trip. I check my tyre pressure every morning. The Micro Floor Drive is a hair more expensive at LBS.

I have the Micro flloor and also one of the Lezyne floor pumps. The standard floor pump weights almost 2 lbs! It really is for use at home and would be difficult to strap to a bike. I happen to like the pump for home use, nice long hose and well made. The micro is designed for bringing on your bike, come with a clip that attaches to the water bottle mounts. Its comfortable to use, weights 8 oz.

Tourist in MSN 02-15-14 05:27 PM

I think the travel one is intended to travel in your car.

Some trips I have brought the Micro Floor Drive, other trips I have instead used a Road Morph G. I have both. I check my pressure about once a week unless I suspect a leak.

himespau 02-15-14 05:45 PM

The micro floor drive isn't too bad to carry and seems more sturdy than the various road and mountain morph's that I've used.

cyclist2000 02-16-14 03:13 PM

The travel drive is twice a long as the micro drive, I think the travel drive is intended to be carried in a car or luggage but not on the bike.

I do own the micro floor drive and keep it on my touring bike but sometimes have my doubt on the threaded valve connector. The first time I used it, I broke off the lock nut on my presta valve. I also have a Road Morph G and it works fine.

chriskmurray 02-16-14 03:24 PM

I have the micro floor drive and really like it, I just put the mount behind a bottle cage and it never gets in the way, plus I still get to keep both cages.

Chris_W 02-16-14 03:32 PM

We carry something similar to the Micro Drive pump on our tandem - it has a short hose, an integrated pressure gauge and a flip-out foot stand. I only carry it on the tandem because if we get a flat on the 28mm tires then I need to get the replacement tube up to 120 psi to avoid pinch flats because of the weight of two people on there. Getting 120 psi is REALLY tough with any regular mini pump, and the gauge is nice to have to know that I made it. On my single bikes, I'm happy with a much smaller and lighter mini pump because I know that I can get those to 60-80 psi without too much trouble, and that is enough to get me home. However, I'm starting to think I should get something in between these two pumps for extended tours. The Lezyne Micro Drive certainly looks like a nice option.

fietsbob 02-16-14 03:33 PM

{edit] as to Q below
Quote:

(check the specs tab on the Lezyne site)
didnt find it, (+ to me i'm not the customer, really didnt look all over site)

To compare, since they dont list length you guys got a tape measure?

Info should be useful for others ..

VT_Speed_TR 02-17-14 06:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fietsbob (Post 16500855)
To compare, since they dont list length you guys got a tape measure?

I own both

cyclist2000 02-17-14 09:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fietsbob (Post 16500855)
To compare, since they dont list length you guys got a tape measure?

60 cm for the travel drive (check the specs tab on the Lezyne site)
30 cm for the micro drive

Tourist in MSN 02-17-14 10:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fietsbob (Post 16500855)
{edit] as to Q below

didnt find it, (+ to me i'm not the customer, really didnt look all over site)

To compare, since they dont list length you guys got a tape measure?

Info should be useful for others ..

Edit - Oops, when I saw the request for comparison, I misread that and compared Road Morph against Micro Floor Drive.

Road Morph G, 14 inches long, 212 grams without bracket, stroke about 9 inches.

Lezyne Micro Floor Drive, slightly under 12 inches long, 187 grams without bracket, stroke 8 inches.

Lezyne slightly smaller diameter so it may take a few more strokes. I am not going to disassemble to measure inside diameter.

The Lezyne hose is almost twice as long which is more convenient, but the chuck threads on which is less convenient.

I find it easier to keep dust out of the Lezyne than the Toppeak which I have disassembled to clean it out. The Lezyne check threads onto the pump base for storage so dirt does not get into it. After cleaning out my Toppeak, I try to remember to put a small piece of electrical tape over the chuck to keep the dust out.

My weights might be a few grams high, I put some inner tube rubber around the cylinders because I use an old Zefel bracket that was sized for a slightly larger diameter pump cylinder. On one tour I carried the Lezyne in the pannier, at 12 inches it just made sense. Although the Toppeak at only two more inches is not much different, it seemed to make more sense to carry it on the frame instead of in pannier. But both fit on the same Zefal bracket.

They both appear to have about the same quality of gauge, if one company makes a more accurate gauge, I do not know which. I have used two Road Morph G pumps, one read 10 psi different than the other.

wheelinthai 02-17-14 11:03 AM

Thanks for all your replies. I do light touring, and it seems contradictory, that I should consider a clumsy floor drive pump. However, I cycle for enjoyment of the ride, dicing with who ever crossed path, and I like to keep tyre pessure at maximum 120lbs (not local bike shop lol). The tyres are 700c 25mm. So I asked if it would be worth it to carry something bigger, and less work every morning. The pump will not be an emergency tool to pull out in case of a flat only.

Aushiker 02-18-14 10:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by himespau (Post 16499051)
The micro floor drive isn't too bad to carry and seems more sturdy than the various road and mountain morph's that I've used.

That is my experience as well and I have two now ... a high volume version for the mountain bike and high pressure version (actually two) for the other bikes.

Andrew

Chris_W 02-19-14 01:45 AM

If you don't weigh 110 kg / 240 lbs then 120 psi in 25mm tires is probably more than ideal, see the table in this pdf (note that the x-axis is the weight on EACH wheel not total weight).

wheelinthai 02-19-14 02:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chris_W (Post 16508123)
If you don't weigh 110 kg / 240 lbs then 120 psi in 25mm tires is probably more than ideal, see the table in this pdf (note that the x-axis is the weight on EACH wheel not total weight).

Thanks. I found the article interesting, albeit contradictory. Then I realized that the author was discussing "optimum comfort and speed" .

However, I cycle for enjoyment of the ride, dicing with who ever crossed path, and I like to keep tyre pessure at maximum 120lbs (not local bike shop lol). I do light touring, and the whole bicycle package including rider and stuffs is < 85 kg. total. BTW, I do not see cyclist using same tyre pressure for clincher and tubular tyres, even though they are of same width.

Chris_W 02-20-14 02:08 AM

I don't understand your comments - if you're riding for the enjoyment of the ride then why would you not want to optimize the comfort and speed that your tires give you? Do you prefer less comfort and less speed, because that is what over-inflated tires will give you.

What is written on the tire sidewall is the MAXIMUM pressure and not the RECOMMENDED pressure for your setup.

You are correct that tubular tires have far higher maximum pressures than clincher tires, but I would recommend the same inflation pressure regardless of the type of tire - weight and tire width are the only factors for me when determining optimal pressure. I agree that many cyclists do run tubular tires even more over-inflated than clincher tires, but that does not make it the correct thing to do.

Too many people have a simplistic "more is better" philosophy when it comes to air pressure in road tires, which is completely wrong.

cyclist2000 02-22-14 10:25 PM

I don't get the OP's need for 120 minimum pressure in the tires either. you want the proper pressure for your weight and not to pinch flat. I weigh 235 and only inflate my tires to 100 psi. This is for 25's on my road bike. Now on my touring bike I use wider tires and a bit lower pressure.

Also I don't have the foggiest idea what dicing is.

I guess if I wanted to top off my tires every morning to 120 psi, I would get a CO2 inflator with a lot of cartridges and a good pressure gauge instead of lugging around a big ass pump

Again if just topping off daily why the need for the large pump the small pump should accomplish the feat easily.


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