Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 33
  1. #1
    Bridge Burner RollCNY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Central NY
    My Bikes
    Felt Rejected
    Posts
    7,134
    Mentioned
    128 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Do CC tourers ride with a fall back plan?

    Hi.
    I am doing my first "tour", which is planned to be 8-10 days solo. I am planning to CC tour, and along that vein have a Tangle frame bag, a large seat bag, and an Osprey Synchro backpack. I am trying to go rackless. However, I am trying to figure out if I should be carrying a backup plan, like a bivy sack, sleepingbag, and pad. It will be early May, so campgrounds will most likely not be open, and any camping would be stealth.

    Should I just put on a rear rack? I have no eyelets on the bike, but that is not a show stopper. I have a great deal of ultra light hiking gear, but no bivy sack. So I would be splurging for a rack and sack. I have an ultralight tent, but am less comfortable stealth camping if I have to pitch a tent.

    Thanks for any feedback. I am leaning to not carry anything other than an emergency foil blanket for a forced overnight. Is that too risky?
    Quote Originally Posted by Man in Black
    Life is pain, Highness. Anyone who says differently is selling something.

  2. #2
    Senior Member mdilthey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    839
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Even when I carried a tent, I still liked the bivy bag for the occasional stealth camp. I say yes. You can use a Superlight bivy from Mountain laurel Designs, or if you want something standalone, check out the Snowyside Bivy from Borah Gear (that's mine).
    Ultralight Gear Lists and Reviews... MAXTHECYCLIST.COM

  3. #3
    Bridge Burner RollCNY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Central NY
    My Bikes
    Felt Rejected
    Posts
    7,134
    Mentioned
    128 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Having never used a bivy, I am assuming that you use a pad inside it, correct?

    Edit: I had written seeping bag also, and I know that that is bvy style and temp dependant. Pad is the question.
    Last edited by RollCNY; 03-08-14 at 03:29 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Man in Black
    Life is pain, Highness. Anyone who says differently is selling something.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Along the Rivers of Pittsburgh
    My Bikes
    2011 Novara Forza Hybrid, 2005 Trek 820, 1989 Cannondale SR500, 1975 Mundo Cycles Caloi Racer
    Posts
    692
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'd say it depends where you are touring, how far apart your planned stops are, and how solid your overnight arrangements are. I'd also consider what the expected weather might be. If you're doing, say, the GAP and C&O, I'd probably not bother. Towns and accommodations are close enough together to not get frantic.

  5. #5
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,087
    Mentioned
    44 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You can put your backpack in a Bike trailer , and the bike is still rackless .

    when it rains , in a bivvy sack you have as much room as the meat in a sausage ..

    a 2 person tent at least you can get dressed before going outside..

    some 1 person tents are so low to not even let you put your shoes on ..

  6. #6
    Bridge Burner RollCNY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Central NY
    My Bikes
    Felt Rejected
    Posts
    7,134
    Mentioned
    128 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Altair 4 View Post
    I'd say it depends where you are touring, how far apart your planned stops are, and how solid your overnight arrangements are. I'd also consider what the expected weather might be. If you're doing, say, the GAP and C&O, I'd probably not bother. Towns and accommodations are close enough together to not get frantic.
    That is what is tough. I am doing some of the circumference of NY, and if I stay exactly on schedule, I have a solid plan for every night but 1. The issue becomes if I get off schedule, I end up in no man's land between.
    Last edited by RollCNY; 03-08-14 at 04:18 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Man in Black
    Life is pain, Highness. Anyone who says differently is selling something.

  7. #7
    Bridge Burner RollCNY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Central NY
    My Bikes
    Felt Rejected
    Posts
    7,134
    Mentioned
    128 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    You can put your backpack in a Bike trailer , and the bike is still rackless .

    when it rains , in a bivvy sack you have as much room as the meat in a sausage ..

    a 2 person tent at least you can get dressed before going outside..

    some 1 person tents are so low to not even let you put your shoes on ..
    I actually have a two wheeled trailer, and debated that route if I want to fully loaded tour. But I don't really want to camp every night. If it was later in the season, when all of the campgrounds are open, I would go that route.

    And I agree on tent benefits vs bivy. I have a Eureka Zeus 1 which has been a phenomenal single wall 1 person tent, with room to change and camp with my 35 lb dog in it with me. But where I have the gear, my plan is fast and light. But I don't want to be unprepared and dead. So I am trying to figure out balance around carry the least that doesn't put my life in jeopardy, if that makes sense.
    Quote Originally Posted by Man in Black
    Life is pain, Highness. Anyone who says differently is selling something.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bay Area, Calif.
    Posts
    5,023
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't see a good reason not to have a rack and almost always have one even on group day rides. Mine weighs under a pound and cost less than $10 from Nashbar - I doubt that I'd be able to notice it while riding. On tours I find that I have much more flexibility with the rack since I can always pick up extra groceries or other items without worrying if they'll fit in limited bag space.

    A small, lightweight tent or good bivy opens up options if you find yourself without available motel/hotel options - or even if hit by a cold hard rain shower during the day when away from other shelter. I'd consider it to be worth the extra weight unless you're really sure about each overnight arrangement in advance.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Above ground, Walnut Creek, Ca
    My Bikes
    7 single speed road
    Posts
    4,352
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    put the rack on the back. carrying weight day after day on your back can be miserable.

    here's what i do.

    stuff your sleeping bag inside your bivy, fold your pad and place it inside your stuff sack, THEN stuff your bivy (with your sleeping bag inside) in the stuff sack. if your bivy is waterproof like mine the sleeeping bag with stay dry even in a rainstorm. strap the stuff sack longitudinally on the rack with a couple of light bungees or compression straps. usually takes about 1-2 minutes to camp and decamp...

    stay in a cheap motel every couple of nights to regroup, cleanup and retain a positive outlook. good luck.

  10. #10
    Bridge Burner RollCNY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Central NY
    My Bikes
    Felt Rejected
    Posts
    7,134
    Mentioned
    128 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for all the feedback folks!
    Quote Originally Posted by Man in Black
    Life is pain, Highness. Anyone who says differently is selling something.

  11. #11
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,087
    Mentioned
    44 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There are lighter , more space efficient tents, now . though Eureka is a bargain

    if you are lot going N+1 shopping for another tent, since you own that one.

  12. #12
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    In The Wind
    My Bikes
    GTO
    Posts
    25,849
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Three friends are presently on 11,000 mile Texas tour )1100miles.jpg
    [SIZE=1][B]What I like about Texas[/B]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PGukLuXzH1E

    Set F1re To The Ra1n ( NY Night Rain Ride)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7jfcWEkSrI

  13. #13
    Every day a winding road spinnaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    2005 Cannondale SR500, 2008 Trek 7.3 FX, Jamis Aurora
    Posts
    4,364
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I usually always have a reservation before rolling into town. I make that decision based on popularity of the region and ease of making reservations.

    For example I tour Italy on the off season. You can pretty much always find a room. And making reservations in a foreign country can be difficult.

    When I did the Pacific coast I figured that there were not many places to get a room and the coast is always popular.

    No matter what I do I always carry a space blanket. I figure it is small an light enough and if I break down and can't get to my lodging for the evening I have a backup plan.

    A bivy is a great idea but it has problems. First if you roll into town to try and get a room, and there is none, you might have a significant way to go to find a campsite, unless you want to stealth camp. Then you are still going to need to find a place to hang it.
    "The world is a dangerous place to live, not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it."

    Albert Einstein

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Bay Area, Calif.
    Posts
    5,023
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by spinnaker View Post
    No matter what I do I always carry a space blanket. I figure it is small an light enough and if I break down and can't get to my lodging for the evening I have a backup plan.

    A bivy is a great idea but it has problems. First if you roll into town to try and get a room, and there is none, you might have a significant way to go to find a campsite, unless you want to stealth camp. Then you are still going to need to find a place to hang it.
    Not sure what problems you see with a bivy as opposed to a space blanket. A bivy is basically just a light, waterproof/resistant material in the shape of a bag, so you use it like a space blanket but it gives more protection from rain and also keeps out insects better. Either way you're likely to get rather chilled at night unless you also carry a sleeping bag/blanket or only tour in really warm climates.

  15. #15
    Bridge Burner RollCNY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Central NY
    My Bikes
    Felt Rejected
    Posts
    7,134
    Mentioned
    128 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You guys have definitely convinced me to contingency plan. I know that I will lack cell coverage in the dacks and Catskills, so I won't know availabiity until arriving. I have double checked campground opening dates, and they won't open until a week after I return. So it will probaby be a Toba rack and my current tent for safety sake.

    I am also seeing that I should grab some more dry sacks. I'm trying to prepare early.
    Quote Originally Posted by Man in Black
    Life is pain, Highness. Anyone who says differently is selling something.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Northern VT
    My Bikes
    recumbent & upright
    Posts
    1,608
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    IMHO - a bivey is fine, but I include a short pad and a light wool blanket in the pack. The pad takes the most space - go for the rack & shed the backpack.
    ride long & prosper

  17. #17
    Every day a winding road spinnaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    2005 Cannondale SR500, 2008 Trek 7.3 FX, Jamis Aurora
    Posts
    4,364
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
    Not sure what problems you see with a bivy as opposed to a space blanket. A bivy is basically just a light, waterproof/resistant material in the shape of a bag, so you use it like a space blanket but it gives more protection from rain and also keeps out insects better. Either way you're likely to get rather chilled at night unless you also carry a sleeping bag/blanket or only tour in really warm climates.
    My mistake maybe. I thought that you had to hang them.
    "The world is a dangerous place to live, not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it."

    Albert Einstein

  18. #18
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,087
    Mentioned
    44 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    maybe Spinnaker was thinking of these: http://hennessyhammock.com/
    it can be a bivvy on the ground, but staked out you wont have it raining


    potentially directly on your face, when you poke your head out .. with the awning over you..

    bike frame can suspend one end, if only 1 pole. (think suspension bridge)

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Above ground, Walnut Creek, Ca
    My Bikes
    7 single speed road
    Posts
    4,352
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by spinnaker View Post
    My mistake maybe. I thought that you had to hang them.
    you're probably thinking of horse thieves...

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Madison, WI
    My Bikes
    2004 LHT, 2009 Thorn Sherpa, 2013 Thorn Nomad, 1961 Ideor, 1972 Raleigh Gran Prix, 1994 Bridgestone MB-6, 2006 Airnimal Joey, Perfekt 3 Speed of unknown age.
    Posts
    1,319
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If your bike has a good seattube and seatpost (not carbon), you could use a rack that clamps onto the seatpost. My tent without footprint weighs 3 pounds, my 25 degree down bag is a bit over 2 pounds and a light shorty thermarest pad is maybe a pound. Add a pound for a clamp on rack, a couple stuff sacks and plastic bags (stuff sack liners for rainy days) and some nylon straps and you have a 7 pound camping setup.

    Some Caradice type saddle bags could hold all this stuff without a rack. A friend of a friend of a friend did the GAP and C&O trail with her father, she used that type of rack for all her gear but her father carried the bulk of the weight, I do not know what her rack and gear weighed.

    I try not to put too much weight in an handlebar bag, but that is one more place you could distribute some of the weight. Unfortunately, handlebar bags and their brackets often are quite heavy empty, so do not have a lot more weight capacity. But I always use one for the convenience.

    IMG_4906.jpg

    You might want to avoid ambiguous acronyms, it took me a couple minutes to figure out you were credit card (CC) touring, not doing a cross country (CC) tour.

  21. #21
    Bridge Burner RollCNY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Central NY
    My Bikes
    Felt Rejected
    Posts
    7,134
    Mentioned
    128 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Sorry for vaguery. Credit Card.
    Quote Originally Posted by Man in Black
    Life is pain, Highness. Anyone who says differently is selling something.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    My Bikes
    Cervelo RS, Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Pro, Schwinn Typhoon, Nashbar touring, custom steel MTB
    Posts
    5,171
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    When I did my credit card tour from San Francisco to Los Angeles, I took enough spares and tools to be able to repair the bike should anything go wrong. I built the bike from the frame up, so I was pretty certain I could fix any common problem well enough to be able to limp to the next town. I brought an inexpensive headlight, blinking tail light, and reflective vest just in case I wasn't going to make the next stop until after sunset. Worst case I would have stripped the expensive components off the frame (~5min), abandoned it, and started hitchhiking.

  23. #23
    Bridge Burner RollCNY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Central NY
    My Bikes
    Felt Rejected
    Posts
    7,134
    Mentioned
    128 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by sstorkel View Post
    When I did my credit card tour from San Francisco to Los Angeles, I took enough spares and tools to be able to repair the bike should anything go wrong. I built the bike from the frame up, so I was pretty certain I could fix any common problem well enough to be able to limp to the next town. I brought an inexpensive headlight, blinking tail light, and reflective vest just in case I wasn't going to make the next stop until after sunset. Worst case I would have stripped the expensive components off the frame (~5min), abandoned it, and started hitchhiking.
    Honestly, you just summed up my initial plan. Spare spokes, tire, tubes, patch kit, pump, spoke wrench, chain tool, spare chain, Allen wrenches, two head lights, three blinkeys, spare batteries, reflective vest, rain gear, thermals, cold weather hat, gloves, and socks, pocket rocket stove, pot, and fuel, street and sun glasses, phone (non smart), tablet, and camera. And on the road food.

    The backpack I referred to is essentially a large camelback, and will have little weight in it other than water. I have done a two day 250 mile trip with it stuffed to the gills, carrying everything, and where I won't repeat that loading, I am not concerned about it being uncomfortable lightly loaded.

    The thing that I am taking from most of you is that it makes sense to just add the rack and bring the gear I already own, even if I successfully find lodging every night. It is better to have it and not need it than the converse.
    Quote Originally Posted by Man in Black
    Life is pain, Highness. Anyone who says differently is selling something.

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    458
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A good choice for an emergency pad is one like this: http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___98096#

    Rolls up to the size of a soda can, and is 7 oz. You can also buy fleece blankets along the way for a few bucks at discount stores, if it's not too cold. This won't be an option out in the countryside, though--although newspapers will do in a pinch.

    Many suggest calling the pastor of a rural church for permission to camp there in an emergency. Often they will invite you inside. Also, if a public campground is closed, you can often carefully set up out of sight and stay overnight anyway, maybe even in some type of shelter. It's not like you're in a ten ton RV.

  25. #25
    Older I get, Better I was velonomad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Schenectady NY & Wilmington NC
    My Bikes
    a bunch of them, most made by me, a couple made by others
    Posts
    1,630
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Don't over plan, you will only frustrate yourself when things don't go exactly to plan(they seldom do). With few exceptions there isn't more than 15 miles between any two towns in NY state. If you can ride 50 miles a day you will easily be in striking distance of at least two motels. As for public campgrounds, In New York State the unwritten rule has long been that individual hikers and cyclists will been accommodated whether the campground is full or not.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •