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  1. #1
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    Light rack on road bike with carbon seat stays?

    Hi,

    I hope this is the right thread to ask this... I am planning a mini-tour of a few days on my road bike and wanted to carry a mid-sized dry bag with stuff (sleeping bag, tent, extra clothing), not exceeding 5 kgs (~11 lbs). It will go attached on top of a rack with bungees.

    Now, my frame is aluminium with carbon seat stays, aluminiun chain stays, carbon seat post and no rack mounts; something like this one: http://www.lamourebikes.com/Jaaz%20bike%20bv4.jpg

    So, the options to carry the light load are:

    1. Mount a light rear rack to the QR skewer and to a seat post collar with rack bosses, the rack being this one: Bontrager: BackRack Lightweight (Model #08214)

    And the seat post clamp collar: Rack-Lock | Parts & Accessories | Salsa Cycles

    The rack manufacturer advises against using that rack in bikes with carbon dropouts. But mine are aluminium (only the seat stay is carbon). Will it be fine? Will be the collar OK with a carbon seat post too?

    2. Mount a beam rack like the following: Topeak® Cycling Accessories ? Products - MTX BeamRack (E-Type)

    This way, though, I should get an alu seat post. And I am afraid the load would wobble around when climbing.

    Would option 1 work in my case? What about option 2? I'm aware there's the option of saddlebags, but I would like to know what do you think about these setups before spending some $$$ on a saddlebag.

    Thanks a lot in advance for your comments.

  2. #2
    djb
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    I
    Axiom makes this model, which mounted securely to my wife's bike.
    Streamliner Road DLX « Streamliner Series « Racks « Products « Axiom Performance Gear

    Using the skewer and brake bolt.
    It is inexpensive, though the top section is very narrow. More suited for lightweight panniers. Don't know if the new lightweight arkels would go on it.
    http://gearblog.bikefriday.com/arkel-dry-lite-bags/
    Last edited by djb; 04-01-14 at 06:07 AM.

  3. #3
    djb
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    Considering how little you want to carry, looking at the photo of that frame, it may be a possibility to p clamp a regular wider topped inexpensive ALU rack onto the areas of your frame that are aluminium, just above and below the carbon stuff. Using layers of old tube sections eliminates scratching and is more secure, but I don't know if tightening a p clamp close to a alu-carbon junction would be risky.

  4. #4
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by djb View Post
    I
    Axiom makes this model, which mounted securely to my wife's bike.
    Streamliner Road DLX « Streamliner Series « Racks « Products « Axiom Performance Gear
    I really like the Axiom Streamliner models and have happily toured with one. I actually prefer the narrowness. It may be less than ideal for strapping stuff on top, but I think you can make it work. If the narrowness is a problem for you, you might look at the rest of the Axiom line to see if another one might suit your needs better, maybe one from the Journey series.

  5. #5
    Senior Member alan s's Avatar
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    First thing that comes to mind is Carradice.

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    I'm a big fan of my Tubus Fly, which looks a lot like the Streamliner but without that ugly extra brace, so lighter. It's rated to 40 lbs, which is more than I can envision carrying. Also, once you put panniers on either side, they become your platform and you can comfortably cinch down a big fat stuff sack, tent, sleeping bag, or whatever in the resulting V-shaped depression. Worked great on my Dutch tour last year.

  7. #7
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alan s View Post
    First thing that comes to mind is Carradice.
    Or Relevate Design
    Stuart Black
    Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
    Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
    Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
    Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
    An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

  8. #8
    djb
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark03 View Post
    I'm a big fan of my Tubus Fly, which looks a lot like the Streamliner but without that ugly extra brace, so lighter. It's rated to 40 lbs, which is more than I can envision carrying. Also, once you put panniers on either side, they become your platform and you can comfortably cinch down a big fat stuff sack, tent, sleeping bag, or whatever in the resulting V-shaped depression. Worked great on my Dutch tour last year.
    Good point about the v shaped area being good to place stuff. The tubus and revelate designs stuff are great options, but now you get into cost considerations.
    I bought the axiom for I believe 35 can. Those arkel waterproof panniers are new and listed at 90, so for about 150 you'd have a waterproof, fairly lightweight setup, still with the top area to attach longer items. Put on a small handlebar bag for valuables, snacks, camera and you'd have a nice system for ultralight packing.

    Seems a tubus fly is at least 100 u.s. minimum, probably closer to 120.
    The revelate stuff is pricey too.
    Last edited by djb; 04-01-14 at 01:09 PM.

  9. #9
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    As there is that carbon seat stay problem .. forget a rear rack, open door No 3

    extrawheel with the panniers on the trailer Bicycle Trailer - Extrawheel.com

    2nd front wheel .. tow is via QR skewer. so no frame contact or much stress.

    the wheel could be the one with the dynohub so as to have a recharge for your cell phone,
    as you ride.

    Extrawheel Voyager Bike Trailer | Bike Trailer

    + you eliminate the kicking the panniers as you pedal , often an Issue
    with typical short chainstay frames ..
    Last edited by fietsbob; 04-01-14 at 02:21 PM.

  10. #10
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    i think the rack in the first link, the Bontrager, comes with two attachment methods, the bottom attachment is the same in both, but the top attachment is via two arms that look to be designed to attach to a seatstay brazeon, which you can't have, and the other to the brake bolt, not seatclamp. could be wrong.

    anyway, i vote for any rack that attaches to skewers and brake bolt, it's proven to be a very secure method on my ancient Blackburn. i would have more faith in the streamliner brake attachment than the Bontrager, only because the Bontrager attachment has a single swivel secured by a small bolt for brake attachment, that even though convenient looks to me like it would come loose enough to swivel under use. possibly be a chronic problem...

  11. #11
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    I would fit a barbag for small/heavy stuff and improvise a saddlebag for the rear.
    Rollup all your stuff in a small tarp and lash to the saddle rails. You can spread the load to the top tube as well.
    See Ultralight bicycle touring

  12. #12
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    Hello,

    Thanks for all the insight. After trying what MichaelW suggested, I think I will go with the Trek Lightweight rack, I found it in a shop around. Tried to put the full load (4-5 kg) on top of a 13 cm (5 inch) wide rack I have in my other bike and rode for a while. No wobbling, just a bit when pushing out of the saddle. The Bontrager rack is 10 cm (~ 4 inch), so I guess it'll be fine. I'm not planning to put panniers.

    This is the cheapest and flexible option, compared to a full Carradice setup or a trailer, considering the light load I intend to carry. Revelate bags are difficult to get in Europe.

    My first concern was related to seat post clamps with rack mounts to be used with carbon seat posts, and carbon dropouts, but it seems that as long as the frame and the dropouts are aluminum, it's OK for the Bontrager rack.

    On a side note, this would be my plan B, with stuff dry bag bunged on top: Arkel Randonneur Rack - Seat Post Rack - Carbon Seat Post Friendly

    More expensive but very clever design (and carbon friendly).

    Thanks again!

  13. #13
    djb
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    the light rack option plus drybags does seem to be the cheapest yet effective system for you. If the rack width is an issue, I'm sure you could improvise a lightweight wider piece of plastic or something to zip tie to the top of the rack, this might make the drybag less inclined to move side to side.
    Also, using bungees or straps to hold on the drybag, be extra careful of them being very secure. A loose bungee or strap in a rear wheel could really mess up your day. I mention this because when we have panniers on either side of a rack, and stuff bungeed to the top of the rack, if any of the securing stuff comes loose, the panniers are there to help stop it going down towards the wheels from the sides. Just keep it in mind and use common sense.

    I guess you could also use a regular seat post saddle bag for keeping your tool kit stuff in, and along with a small handlebar bag for valuables/camera, and your dry bag setup, you're all set.
    Have fun.

    mettez les photos ici si tu veux un jour, sera bien de voir ton system en action. salut.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by djb View Post
    Also, using bungees or straps to hold on the drybag, be extra careful of them being very secure. A loose bungee or strap in a rear wheel could really mess up your day. I mention this because when we have panniers on either side of a rack, and stuff bungeed to the top of the rack, if any of the securing stuff comes loose, the panniers are there to help stop it going down towards the wheels from the sides. Just keep it in mind and use common sense.
    Yeah, after reading some stories about accidents related to bungees, straps seem to be the way to go. Thanks for the piece of advice!

    However, I found some bungees that come with these hooks: Robot Check
    Once attached, they should stay in place.

    I will upload some pics when setting off for a mini-tour (if I find some time..)

  15. #15
    djb
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    I've actually only ever used bungees, without any problems. Whatever works I guess but I do prefer bungees. Again, have fun getting your system set up and any enjoy your eventual tripsp. Any ideas of where you might go?

  16. #16
    Senior Member Doug64's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpetit View Post
    Yeah, after reading some stories about accidents related to bungees, straps seem to be the way to go. Thanks for the piece of advice!

    However, I found some bungees that come with these hooks: Robot Check
    Once attached, they should stay in place.

    I will upload some pics when setting off for a mini-tour (if I find some time..)
    I use a similar clip, but cut off the little "keeper". Use good quality shock cord, and there should not be any problems.

    Last edited by Doug64; 04-08-14 at 10:35 AM.

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