Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 04-12-14, 06:13 PM   #26
Rowan
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Bikes:
Posts: 14,934
Mentioned: 22 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 246 Post(s)
The answer comes with experience, not using a calculator or some website. The answer also changes depending on the rider's fitness.

If you can't answer the question now, you haven't done enough riding.
Rowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-14, 04:23 AM   #27
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Bikes:
Posts: 8,865
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
FWIW, the 100 pound load seems like a pretty good place to make changes that would enhance your trip. That is a very heavy load and not necessary unless you have some very special reason to be taking a lot of heavy stuff. Even with inexpensive camping gear and only moderately aggressive trimming of non essentials, 30 pounds of gear is pretty easy to achieve. Assuming a 30 pound bike that puts you at 60 pounds of bike and gear. The difference is like night and day in riding comfort in my experience.
staehpj1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-14, 10:05 PM   #28
Jim Kukula
Senior Member
 
Jim Kukula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: New York State
Bikes: Thorn Nomad Mk2, 1996 Trek 520, Workcycles Transport, Brompton
Posts: 585
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
I just did a spot check using 250 pounds & 15% grade, and 170 watts. You're climbing at 2.2 mph. With 19 gear inches that's a cadence of 40. That looks to me to be pretty difficult to sustain, very low speed very low cadence.
My bottom gear is more like 17 inches. I find myself crawling up hills at 2.2 mph quite regularly! So my cadence down there is probably more like 45! With my mildly corpulent BMI 25 body and my mighty steel 40 pound bike and then the lock etc. I am probably hauling more like 225 pounds up the hill. I imagine I am in that territory at a slightly small grade because 170 watts is too much for me to sustain... if the power meter on my rowing machine is to be believed!

But anyway that kind of low speed low cadence is pretty much how I get around on my bike! The price I pay for living in the Catskills Mountains!
Jim Kukula is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-14-14, 11:49 PM   #29
Carbonfiberboy 
just another gosling
 
Carbonfiberboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Everett, WA
Bikes: CoMo Speedster 2003, Trek 5200, CAAD 9, Fred 2004
Posts: 11,343
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 138 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
<snip>
Ps, I just did a spot check using 250 pounds & 15% grade, and 170 watts. You're climbing at 2.2 mph. With 19 gear inches that's a cadence of 40. That looks to me to be pretty difficult to sustain, very low speed very low cadence.
As I said somewhere above, your calculation might surprise you. So #1 , less weight. #2 , train for it. Take your bike out to a long steady hill, put it in a big gear until even with a strong effort your cadence is around 50. Do 10 minute hill repeats like that. I usually do a set of 3, once or twice a week. You can also do these on a trainer or rollers if you have enough resistance. They really work. Learn to pedal circles at low rpms without moving your upper body. Do it all with your legs. Move your feet 'round and 'round. Never walk. Instead, stop to rest for one minute at a time. That's faster and better for you.
Carbonfiberboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-14, 09:46 AM   #30
rifraf
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Perth Australia
Bikes: Surly Ogre, Carry Freedom Y-frame, Extrawheel Trailer
Posts: 742
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
My low gear is approx 17 gear inches.
Once my cadence falls below 70 rpm, I'm looking to dismount and push.
I've just got back from a months jaunt around the south coast of Western Australia.
Its pretty hilly by Aussie standards so there was lots of portage and thankfully associated weight loss.
My jeans are thanking me for it.
I just wish my Rohloff warranty allowed me an inch lower in gearing but alas I'm at the limit utilising a 34T front ring and 16T sprocket on my Surly Ogres 700c wheels clad in 2 inch Mondials.
rifraf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-14, 04:29 AM   #31
Walter S
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Atlanta, GA. USA
Bikes: Surly Long Haul Disc Trucker
Posts: 2,907
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 169 Post(s)
I switched out the inner 26T chainring for a 24T. Yesterday I went on the ride to Vogel State Park that I was worried about. I tried to put my bicycle on a diet but still left with the loaded bike right at 100 lbs.

I was was highly pleased! The lower gearing was a definite help. I went to that lowest gear rarely but I was glad it was there when I wanted it. And having a lower gear to go to when my energy is hitting a low in the afternoon is definitely a good thing. Late in the ride some of the "easy" hills were asking for that lowest gear.

Last edited by Walter S; 04-19-14 at 04:33 AM.
Walter S is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:27 PM.