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Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

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Old 04-11-14, 03:26 AM   #1
aomnobrili
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Jamis Coda Sport for touring

Hello there,

I'm currently looking for a bike which would not only be really good for city commuting, but which I could also take with me to Europe for a 1-2 month long tour. I've tried riding several types of bicycles in bike shops including flat-bar road bikes and "proper" touring bikes. After doing several test rides at a few bike rides, my favourite was easily the Jamis Coda Sport. It is the most comfortable bike I have ever ridden! Obviously, the price is tempting too.

I'm wondering how this bike would go touring. I have heard and read that the bike may not be best for extended heavy touring. Broken spokes would definitely spoil a trip! I will have a two rear panniers and a backpack strapped onto a rear rack, as well as a small handlebar bag. I weigh 75 kg. But I was wondering if perhaps by replacing the back wheel to a sturdier, better quality one, I might be able to use this bike. I'd also do some other mods, e.g. bar ends or butterfly bars.

In summary: I really want this bike, but I'm wondering what modifications I'd need so I could transport quite a lot of weight (possibly up to 115 kg including bike, me & luggage).

Here's the bike by the way: JAMIS BICYCLES

Cheers!
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Old 04-11-14, 07:03 AM   #2
VT_Speed_TR
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My wife and daughter each have purchased Jamis Coda Sports for their use. A really nice bike at a great price. The gearing would be good for touring, lots of mounting points, etc. Overall a good bike. For the price (we found by daughters as a leftover for $350) it would be easy to upgrade the wheels to some better wheels for touring. Or just ask your LBS what they thing of the spokes/wheels. My daughter has toured on some short tours with me, but was not carrying the weight you are talking about. Overall, I see no reason not to use the Jamis, perhaps getting a new rear wheel only for the extra weight. At these price points ($500) you are not going to get great wheels. But both my daughter & wife love their bikes and have had zero issues with them. I did put wider tires on my wifes and installed a Cane Creek Thrudbuster seatpost on hers since she likes a smoother ride. Overall, a great bike for the price.
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Old 04-11-14, 07:43 AM   #3
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aomnobrili, Welcome to the forum.

Because you like the fit and I don't see anything in the specs. or geometry to suggest a poor choice, go buy it. Ride it for awhile "as is" to determine what changes/improvements are really needed.

Chain stay length is a little short so there maybe some heel strike if you use large rear panniers, but the fork is equipped with a mid mount attachment for a rack and panniers. Have the wheel set re-tensioned and re-trued. Bikes at this price point generally have a machine made wheel set and do lack a fine tuning.

Brad
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Old 04-11-14, 07:55 AM   #4
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My 80s touring experience was on a department store frankenbike - looked like they wandered around various parts bins and threw something interesting together. It had a good frame and geometry for touring, and all the right attachment mounts for racks. But it had 27 x 1 inch wheels. I was about the same weight as you. I did get a pinch flat after bunny hopping some railroad tracks (not a good idea with a loaded bike), but I didn't have a single problem with the spokes. I swapped tires for something wider and more flat resistent, and better tubes, and I was fine for that tour and every one afterwards.

I wouldn't be quick to change the wheels, I would ensure that when you get the bike and when you go on tour, that the spokes are properly tensioned. I have never owned a tension meter, always plucked the spokes to see if there was a spoke that was out, it is easier than you think. If the wheels are well set up, you should be fine. I notice the tires are a good size for touring and puncture resistent.

I suggest you try some day trips or weekends loaded up the way you will be on the longer tour. Think of it as a shakedown cruise.

Last edited by JamesRL; 04-11-14 at 07:56 AM. Reason: addition
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Old 04-11-14, 09:04 AM   #5
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That Coda Sport is nice. However, if I were you, I'd get the Jamis Aurora and then I'd just add interrupter brakes to it for convenience!

Last edited by WestPablo; 04-11-14 at 09:09 AM.
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Old 04-11-14, 01:47 PM   #6
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$.02 go to front low riders, small panniers in front, nice cheap platform rack in back and pile stuff on it. This takes care of a couple things, front wheel is inherently stronger than rear so it can take a load. The rear chainstays are shortish for panniers but you won't have to change the rear wheel or deal with the weird handling of heavy rear loads. Handling is slower with front low riders but much more stable than having 75% of your total weight on the rear wheel.
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Old 04-11-14, 04:46 PM   #7
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lots of brands all want you to buy theirs instead of the other guys , its a competitive market out there.

it seems like something to work with ,,

buying all the stuff thats not there at point of sale , usually gets a 10% discount and the shop will put it on for you.

trekking bars are a low cost swap for hybrid bikes ..

Ergon grip/bar-end combinations are nice too, ..
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Old 04-11-14, 08:18 PM   #8
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Go for it, realizing that Fit is First. Ride as much as possible before the tour to find out what you want to tweak about it. Bar height, saddle position(not height)and type, pedals, mechanical components. Do some out and backs with the bike loaded to touring weight. Then have the rear wheel checked for proper spoke tension.

FWIW, most tourists never have problems with spokes breaking. Since you'll be touring in first world countries, finding a bike shop should not be a big deal if there are serious problems.
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Old 04-13-14, 02:09 AM   #9
aomnobrili
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Thanks for all of your comments and suggestions! I don't use forums much (only when I'm really stuck) and I'm surprised at how helpful you've all been. I'm very excited to get it! I'll definitely do some test riding before the big trip and make sure all the spokes are properly tuned.

As for the chain stay length, it's longer than the bike I'm currently riding, which I've been able to put panniers on without any heel strike. You just need to mount the panniers as far back as they go and there's no problem!
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Old 04-13-14, 03:37 PM   #10
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I test rode a Jamis coda.. Really liked it. When the opportunity arrives , I am going to snag one up!!!
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