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  1. #1
    clg
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    Intolerable Foot Pain

    Monday - Wednesday I was doing a tour checking out my gear for an upcoming longer tour when my left foot began to burn, this was on the second day. The pain was so severe I had to stop and massage the sole of my foot before continuing. On the third day of riding I had the problem in both feet and eventually stopped and examined my shoes. It seem that the cleat or the mounting it was screwed into was pressing through the insole. I seem to recall a thread a couple of years ago where someone else was complaining of burning feet and I wonder if my problem was the same? Any suggestions, I have a very challenging tour starting at the end of the month and this on top of my normal aches and pains will make for a very miserable time. The shoes are Pearl iZUMi Men's X-Alp Seek V Cycling Shoes
    Amazon.com: Pearl iZUMi Men's X ALP Seek V Cycling Shoe, Black/Shadow Grey, 47 EU/12.5 D US: Mountain Biking Shoes: Shoes
    or could it be the pedals?
    I'm going to replace the insole and try a different pedal. Your thoughts?

  2. #2
    Have bike, will travel Barrettscv's Avatar
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    Get a really stiff pair of road cycling shoes. Consider the models with carbon fiber soles. Yes, these are very difficult to walk in, but it's better to have minimal pain while riding.
    When I ride my bike I feel free and happy and strong. I'm liberated from the usual nonsense of day to day life. Solid, dependable, silent, my bike is my horse, my fighter jet, my island, my friend. Together we will conquer that hill and thereafter the world.

  3. #3
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    im going through torture with the exact same problem got tablets from my doctor only last week to ease the pain, i might as well be taking sweets (candy) useless , but i do get great relief if i steep my feet in hot water with a good fistfull of epson salts works great.
    sorry i cant be of more help i know what your going through .

    the carbon soles is a waste of time honest i've been down that road even got specialist insoles which dont work
    Last edited by antokelly; 06-05-14 at 04:28 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member AusTexMurf's Avatar
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    Try removing the insole of your cycling shoes.
    Cover the area over the cleat plate with your favorite vinyl stickers, trimming them to fit as/if needed.
    Two layers or so will provide enough float for your feet to ignore the holes and/or cleat screws.

    I say this because I had a very worn pair of commuter shoes with a bit of flex. Developed a similar burning sensation in one foot.
    Applied stickers.
    Problem solved.

    Alternately,
    Try new/different insoles. Thicker, with more padding ?
    With or W/O sticker treatment.

    Best.
    Last edited by AusTexMurf; 06-05-14 at 05:04 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AusTexMurf View Post
    Try removing the insole of you cycling shoes.
    Cover the area over the cleat plate with your favorite vinyl stickers, trimming them to fit as/if needed.
    Two layers or so will provide enough float for your feet to ignore the holes and/or cleat screws.

    I say this because I had a very worn pair of commuter shoes with a bit of flex. Developed a similar burning sensation in one foot.
    Applied stickers.
    Problem solved.

    Alternately,
    Try new/different insoles.
    With or W/O sticker treatment.

    Best.
    can't get my hear around what you mean ,dont suppose you have a photo of your shoe

    sorry for being a thickie.

  6. #6
    clg
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    Thanks, I was thinking of trying exactly that, I took out the insole and saw that there is an indentation from the cleat/attachment on the underside. I may do both, buy some stiffer insoles and fill the recess as you describe or in a similar manner.

    Quote Originally Posted by AusTexMurf View Post
    Try removing the insole of your cycling shoes.
    Cover the area over the cleat plate with your favorite vinyl stickers, trimming them to fit as/if needed.
    Two layers or so will provide enough float for your feet to ignore the holes and/or cleat screws.
    Best.

  7. #7
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    my solution that has been successful is contra popular , is quill toe clip pedals . and then I can wear stiff but loose fitting shoes ,

    and supportive insoles , so my feet have good circulation of blood and no pinched nerves .

  8. #8
    Crazyguyonabike
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    I had some problems with this, it got better when I switched to sandals. I think they let my feet spread out and breathe more. Shimano make some good SPD sandals, but I am currently using a pair that isn't made any more (Lake) with platform pedals. No more hot foot.
    Last edited by NeilGunton; 06-05-14 at 10:30 PM.

  9. #9
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Move the cleat all the way back.
    Loosen the shoes.

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    +1 on getting shoes with stiffer soles and loosening the ties. Linked shoe does not look like it's going to be all that stiff. I had problems with foot pain before, and they were solved/minimized by loosening front straps. Last weekend I managed 14 hours continuously in the saddle in a pair of shoes that I bought just 10 days prior. I had all sorts of aches but feet weren't among the affected areas. The shoes were Specialized Pro Road (stiff carbon soles) in a wide size.

    I'm skeptical about moving the cleat all the way back. (Heard this advice, tried it, didn't really find it helpful.) It probably solves some sort of problem but not the problem that you're having, and the downside is that you have to rely on your quads more because moving the cleat makes you less able to generate power in the ankle/foot joint.

  11. #11
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    FWIW- I had a problem with burning pain in both feet. I took my cycling shoes with me to a foot doctor and he 1/ trimmed the callous on the bottom of my feet, 2/ put lambskin(?) pad on the bottom of my insoles. That was two years ago and my feet still feel good. Jay

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hamster View Post
    +1 on getting shoes with stiffer soles and loosening the ties. Linked shoe does not look like it's going to be all that stiff.
    +1. I looked at similar pair of PI shoes a few weeks ago. I was surprised at how easily I could flex the soles with my hands.

    OP: I havbe been touring and commuting with these for years:

    Shimano SH-MT33L Mountain Shoe | Shimano | Brand | www.PricePoint.com

    (Amazon has a few sizes left, too.)

    They are pretty darn stiff, and the soles are tough. Looking at them you would never guess that they are as old as they are and have seen their fare share of concrete walking.
    "I've wanted you to succeed, but watching you find excuse after excuse after excuse and then laugh it off as the loveable, quirky, chubby guy is getting old."--Ill.Clyde

  13. #13
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    I use flat pedals with pins and some stiff shoes. I like keen sandals, low hiking boots and sport mt biking shoes with no clips. Less shoes to carry touring, just get off and walk.

  14. #14
    Senior Member yeamac's Avatar
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    I take it these are brand new shoes and you just started using them? If cleat placement/protrusion isn't a problem, you might need a different shoe and/or size.

    One thing to take into consideration is that your feet generally swell during a ride. Some people, myself included, need to wear 1/2 to 1 shoe size larger when cycling longer distances. When I wore my shoe size in cycling shoes, I got extreme pain after 70 miles until I went with a larger sized shoe.

    I didn't care for a cleat when touring, so after years of trial and error went with a lightweight non-cycling shoe and a large platform pedal, the MKS Lambda, pictured below. With touring, meaning you'll be off the bike daily going into restaurants, stores, even hiking, I found this to be an excellent solution so as not to have to bother with changing shoes throughout the day. Cycling with a nice large pedal like the Lambda means you don't have to have a stiff-soled shoe. (I'm currently wearing Merrell Trail running shoes). I've had absolutely no foot pain with this combo, and it is far more comfortable than any cycling shoe ever was, and I've tried expensive road shoes to mountain shoes.

    That's another perspective. Good luck! It took me years to find foot nirvana.

    41Q-y6Ag4ML.jpg

  15. #15
    Senior Member wsgts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Machka View Post
    Move the cleat all the way back.
    Loosen the shoes.
    +1 and move your seat down an inch to create more bend in the knee.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wsgts View Post
    +1 and move your seat down an inch to create more bend in the knee.
    no no that can only lead to other problems,in my case i have pain in my fet most of the time long walks is a big problem as is climbing hills when cycling.

  17. #17
    clg
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    Quote Originally Posted by hamster View Post
    +1 on getting shoes with stiffer soles and loosening the ties. Linked shoe does not look like it's going to be all that stiff. I had problems with foot pain before, and they were solved/minimized by loosening front straps. Last weekend I managed 14 hours continuously in the saddle in a pair of shoes that I bought just 10 days prior.
    I like the idea and before buying yet another pair of shoes I'll try a pair that I haven't been wearing that are very much like the ones you suggest.
    Thanks

  18. #18
    Senior Member wsgts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antokelly View Post
    no no that can only lead to other problems,in my case i have pain in my fet most of the time long walks is a big problem as is climbing hills when cycling.
    Well if the seat is too high, it causes foot pain since the foot is reaching on the bottom, so it only corrected all my foot pain, even at 100+ miles. It's free, and easily moved back if it doesn't help. For me, moving the seat down and the cleat more to the middle cured my foot pain.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wsgts View Post
    Well if the seat is too high, it causes foot pain since the foot is reaching on the bottom, so it only corrected all my foot pain, even at 100+ miles. It's free, and easily moved back if it doesn't help. For me, moving the seat down and the cleat more to the middle cured my foot pain.
    ah if only it was that simple,in my case i'm set up perfectly on the bike,i hope i'm not been dismissif of your suggestion i don't mean to be just that i have foot pain on and off the bike.i've tried all the above suggestions over years none of them work,

  20. #20
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    Back to back centuries gave me hot foot on my right foot or just irritate it so bad is was bothersome. Like a blow torch blasting away. And I was riding carbon soles. The right foot is 1/2 size bigger than the left and invariably a snug right shoe, snug toe clip (old school) would set it off so I learned to keep my shoes/clips very loose when riding for more than an hour or so to let the feet expand and every longer rest stop..off come the shoes. Since your touring there's no point in grinding so I'd also suggest easy gears. Ultimately you'll find yourself going to swap meets and trying a lot of shoes on to get the perfect fit. I've not tried heat set insoles yet though I've played around with a lot of insoles and discovered that if you are going to do that..better order shoes 1/2 size bigger as adding a thicker insole means less foot space. I wear a Euro 48 & finding the right shoes at a decent $ isn't easy and my right foot really deserves a Euro 49.
    Last edited by Jseis; 06-08-14 at 08:18 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by wsgts View Post
    Well if the seat is too high, it causes foot pain since the foot is reaching on the bottom, so it only corrected all my foot pain, even at 100+ miles. It's free, and easily moved back if it doesn't help. For me, moving the seat down and the cleat more to the middle cured my foot pain.
    Too high of a saddle position and max knee height can be mutually exclusive issues. You can get a bit more bend in the knee with longer cranks, which will require you bring you seat post down as far as the difference in crank length, and maybe moving your saddle forwards or backwards. If you are looking to adjust your knee positioning I wouldn't look at saddle height too much...

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leebo View Post
    I use flat pedals with pins and some stiff shoes. I like keen sandals, low hiking boots and sport mt biking shoes with no clips. Less shoes to carry touring, just get off and walk.
    This also works for me a bmx pedal and Keen sandals on touring bike, cleats,on road bike.

  23. #23
    Senior Member Cyclebum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NeilGunton View Post
    I had some problems with this, it got better when I switched to sandals. I think they let my feet spread out and breathe more. Shimano make some good SPD sandals, but I am currently using a pair that isn't made any more (Lake) with platform pedals. No more hot foot.
    Something like Neil said worked for me. I switched to a ventilated, less restrictive shoe, with insole, on platforms. This, and being able to move my feet about on the pedals, cured most of my hotfoot issues. The problem is caused by nerve irritation from the pressure point.

    A mystery is why it becomes such a problem for some and not for others.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leebo View Post
    I use flat pedals with pins and some stiff shoes. I like keen sandals, low hiking boots and sport mt biking shoes with no clips. Less shoes to carry touring, just get off and walk.
    That is my solution as well. I have a pair of mountain bike pedals with the pins and they stick very well to my shoe. I can pull back and up with my foot on the upstroke and the foot won't slip. I usually don't do that of course, I'm just touring, not racing. The platform pedal disperses the pressure over a larger area so you are less apt to have pressure related issues. I did one tour wearing Crocs with no problems.

  25. #25
    Senior Member wsgts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antokelly View Post
    ah if only it was that simple,in my case i'm set up perfectly on the bike,i hope i'm not been dismissif of your suggestion i don't mean to be just that i have foot pain on and off the bike.i've tried all the above suggestions over years none of them work,
    I was not professionally fitted, so I'm sure they would have seen I had my saddle too high, but if you are self adjusting you can easy get to saddle too high. I actually had a lot more pain on my road bike than my touring bike for some reason.
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