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-   -   Young, New, and ambitious biker (http://www.bikeforums.net/touring/952194-young-new-ambitious-biker.html)

Deathnever 06-06-14 12:37 AM

Young, New, and ambitious biker
 
1 Attachment(s)
Well, I am currently biking
16 km 4 days a week and every other weekend i do two 30km bikes (one sat one sun)

I know I would be able to push myself to a much higher number, but that doesn't seem like it would be safe if i was too exhausted.

But I would like to be able to push myself to maybe travel 100KM by the end of the summer.
(september, when i have to return to school)

I was wondering, would i have any issues using my CCM Mountain bike for long distance biking?

The seat is normally down to the bottom
http://bikeforums.net/attachment.php...hmentid=385434

Is there something i can do to make my better perform better for it?

I still have a fear of the roads, cars passing by at such speeds is scary.

fietsbob 06-06-14 09:02 AM

the bike is not great, but a bike trailer for your stuff.. means when that bike fails you can just get another one ..

hook the trailer up and continue .. .

mdilthey 06-06-14 09:28 AM

You should go to your local bike shop and get your seat set to the right level, as well as your handlebars. If you have your seat too low, you can hurt your knees.

A professional can fit you real quick, and they'll probably do it for free if you ask nicely or bring them a cup of coffee.

Sullalto 06-06-14 11:17 AM

No reason why not, people do that on mountain bikes on trails. Pavement is easier. Lots of people tour with flat handlebars/upright posture, or do charity rides that way as well. I've done 80, 90 km rides on a comfort/cruiser style bike at a decent pace.

You definitely want to get your seat adjusted though. You'll use more muscle(both different muscles in combination, and sheer mass), making it a lot easier. Once you get adjusted of course.

in my completely noob, uneducated opinion, saddle and leg position matter more than bike. A high quality/well matched bike will make things easier, for sure. But without good fit and saddle, it doesn't matter what you ride, you'll hit a wall a lot sooner. But again, I'm a noob.

Be sure and have enough liquid and some food. Most bike/running/tri/outdoor shops will have fast digest gels and energy bar sort of things, meant to be consumed while active.

Or you could classic and eat bananas and pb&j's. Or convenience store snacks.

JamesRL 06-06-14 11:33 AM

Your knobby tires will make you work harder than you need to on the roads. A smoother treaded tire will be easier.

And of course the fit that everyone else mentions.

fairymuff 06-06-14 12:13 PM

The 'seat' is called a saddle, and it should be so high that your leg is nearly fully extended when the pedal is in the lower position (6 'o clock).

As far as the rest is concerned: take it as it comes, and see how far you get. If you don't already own any, get yourself some biking gloves (they needn't be expensive), and some padded shorts. I usually wear lycra cycling shorts with regular shorts over them, so I don't look like a **** off the bike :)


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