Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-12-14, 09:30 AM   #26
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Bikes:
Posts: 8,837
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cyclebum View Post
Re the pump. With those skinny tires, you might want to go with the mini Road Morph. The in line gage on the larger version is not good for much. I just do the pinch test. Road Morphs are extremely reliable pumps.
Lezynes are prett nice too.
staehpj1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-14, 10:02 AM   #27
venturi95
Woof!
 
venturi95's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NorCal
Bikes: Breezer Venturi, Lemond Ti, Santa Cruz Blur, Soma Saga, Miyata Colorado
Posts: 281
Most will agree: taking only one pair of shorts is the worst advice posted here. A second pair of shorts on any tour is no burden.
venturi95 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-14, 11:22 AM   #28
rm -rf
don't try this at home.
 
rm -rf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: N. KY
Bikes:
Posts: 3,558
I don't think I could like that Revelate bag. It looks too wide right under the saddle. I don't even like most small seat bags for tools and spare tubes, they are too wide, and rub my legs.

I have an older Topeak rack with two 5mm bolts to lock it onto the seatpost, and even the width around the seatpost is slightly annoying.

~~~~~
The Topeak Mini-morph is fine for 23c or 25c tires. It doesn't need a gauge, since it's very difficult to pump it over about 90 psi. I think I counted over 200 pump strokes the last time I used it to fix a flat. I've never tried to use one for topping off the pressure on a long trip. That might be a bit tedious.
rm -rf is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-14, 12:12 PM   #29
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Bikes:
Posts: 8,837
Quote:
Originally Posted by venturi95 View Post
Most will agree: taking only one pair of shorts is the worst advice posted here. A second pair of shorts on any tour is no burden.
Not sure about most, but I have done long tours including a camping and cooking coast to coast one with one pair of bike shorts and did not find it to be a hardship. Nothing wrong with taking more if you want but it is certainly possible to get by with one, especially since the OP is asking about a credit card tour where presumably he will have a room every night.
staehpj1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-14, 12:29 PM   #30
RollCNY
Speechless
 
RollCNY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Central NY
Bikes: Felt Brougham, Lotus Prestige, Cinelli Xperience,
Posts: 8,714
If you aren't locked in with the Viscacha, the Revelate Tangle frame bag is great, especially for odd shaped things. Spare tire, pump, rain jacket rolled around the pump, and easy access on bike to get to map cue sheet or food. I am a big fan.

Also, I went without a rack, and bought SeaLion dry bags. One for the handlebars, one for under the seat. Worked very well. Also, sneakers are bulky, but flip flops can be strapped right to the outside of the dry bag and held in place.

RollCNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-14, 12:48 PM   #31
NealH 
Senior Member
 
NealH's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Triangle, NC
Bikes: S-Works Tarmac
Posts: 1,442
Quote:
Originally Posted by RollCNY View Post
If you aren't locked in with the Viscacha, the Revelate Tangle frame bag is great, especially for odd shaped things. Spare tire, pump, rain jacket rolled around the pump, and easy access on bike to get to map cue sheet or food. I am a big fan.

Also, I went without a rack, and bought SeaLion dry bags. One for the handlebars, one for under the seat. Worked very well. Also, sneakers are bulky, but flip flops can be strapped right to the outside of the dry bag and held in place.
Do you find the frame bag interferes with your legs while pedaling? Do you have to take care in packing the frame bag to mitigate the chance of interference? I like the Revelate bags - but have not tried the frame bag due to worry that there may be interference.
NealH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-14, 12:59 PM   #32
Booger1
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Gaseous Cloud around Uranus
Bikes:
Posts: 3,676
300 mile credit card tour?.....Unless your going to Death Valley or some such......Be able to fix a flat....
Booger1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-14, 01:08 PM   #33
RollCNY
Speechless
 
RollCNY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Central NY
Bikes: Felt Brougham, Lotus Prestige, Cinelli Xperience,
Posts: 8,714
Quote:
Originally Posted by NealH View Post
Do you find the frame bag interferes with your legs while pedaling? Do you have to take care in packing the frame bag to mitigate the chance of interference? I like the Revelate bags - but have not tried the frame bag due to worry that there may be interference.
When standing, it might rub if you move the bike significantly side to side. In seated riding, it is unnoticeable, and I ride with my knees fairly tight to the top tube.

On the return leg of the trip pictured, I actually packed everything in the under seat dry bag into the Tangle, plus the rain jacket I was wearing at the time of that photo. It bulged out like squirrel cheeks, but was still totally unobtrusive. I am a gigantic fan of that frame bag.
RollCNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 07:00 AM   #34
Lone
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2014
Bikes: Pinarello Veneto
Posts: 187
Quote:
Originally Posted by RollCNY View Post
When standing, it might rub if you move the bike significantly side to side. In seated riding, it is unnoticeable, and I ride with my knees fairly tight to the top tube.

On the return leg of the trip pictured, I actually packed everything in the under seat dry bag into the Tangle, plus the rain jacket I was wearing at the time of that photo. It bulged out like squirrel cheeks, but was still totally unobtrusive. I am a gigantic fan of that frame bag.
yes, frame bags rub. get a standard camping dry bag, and lash it under your seat, or put in on top of a seat post rack.
Lone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 07:38 AM   #35
Machka 
Long Distance Cyclist
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: I ride where the thylacine roamed!
Bikes: Lots
Posts: 45,525
This was a credit card tour a few years ago ...
https://www.flickr.com/photos/machka...7627943421118/




Machka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 10:19 AM   #36
MichaelW
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: England
Bikes:
Posts: 12,920
With smaller loads, bags can become a significant part of the weight.
Metal racks, meant for big loads can carry small loads, but weigh the same.
the saddlebag/barbag combo is an efficient CC-style luggage solution.
MichaelW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 10:51 AM   #37
Miles2go
Zen Master
 
Miles2go's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: On the water in Western Washington
Bikes: More than a few.
Posts: 859
Carrying gear on any sport/race bike is a compromise of some sort.

I credit card tour on a 15 pound carbon race bike (Record SuperSix HM) and having tried many methods of carrying the load on sport bikes (since the late 80s), I'm most happy with the gear carried as low and secure as possible on a rack (skewers & brake bridge attachment points) and panniers/bag arrangement or in a biker style backpack like Osprey makes.

Cheers.
__________________
Ron - Washington
The Loaded Touring Bike - Photo Gallery
Since 2005 - Worldwide - No Ads - Just Inspiration

Last edited by Miles2go; 08-13-14 at 11:38 AM.
Miles2go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 12:09 PM   #38
nun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Bikes: Rivendell Quickbeam, Rivendell Rambouillet, Rivendell Atlantis, Circle A town bike, De Rosa Neo Primato, Cervelo RS
Posts: 3,258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
This was a credit card tour a few years ago ...
https://www.flickr.com/photos/machka...7627943421118/




I like the combination of a Carradice saddlebag with a handlebar bag for touring. It's been popular for day trips and inn to inn touring in the UK since the early 20th Century. In someways it's similar to the bikepacking approach. If the saddle to rear wheel clearance is large enough you don't need a Bagman support and the saddlebag can be tucked up under the saddle bringing it close to the bike and rider's center of mass. For credit card trips I use a small Carradice Barley bag and maybe a front Ortlieb bar bag. For a recent overnight trip to visit friends I just used the Barley as all I needed was a change of clothes. If I want to be more independent I'll use the far larger Carradice Camper saddlebag and pack my tent, sleeping bag, pad and cooking equipment. I sometimes combine cycling with a train trip and if you only have a couple of bags fuss is kept to a minimum.



British Transport Films: Cyclists Special - YouTube

Last edited by nun; 08-13-14 at 12:16 PM.
nun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 12:30 PM   #39
Miles2go
Zen Master
 
Miles2go's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: On the water in Western Washington
Bikes: More than a few.
Posts: 859
Nice looking ride NUN.

The majority of tourers seem to enjoy bags at the bar (handlebar bags) as well as the ultralights embracing high mounted rear bags, but part of my love for riding includes climbing and moving the bike underneath me. To each their own but I don't like what high positioned weight does to a sport bike.

Great that we have many options these days.

Cheers.
__________________
Ron - Washington
The Loaded Touring Bike - Photo Gallery
Since 2005 - Worldwide - No Ads - Just Inspiration
Miles2go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 12:47 PM   #40
tarwheel 
Senior Member
 
tarwheel's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Raleigh, NC
Bikes: Waterford RST-22, Bob Jackson World Tour, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Soma Saga, De Bernardi SL, Specialized Sequoia
Posts: 8,323
No way I would tour with just one pair of shorts and one jersey. You would need to wash out my gear every night, but it might not be dry by morning if the weather is humid or your clothes get particularly wet from rain. If you don't wash your clothes after every use, not only will they stink but you run a much higher risk of developing saddle sores. It would be much better to cut back in other areas, such as wearing cycling shoes that are also comfortable for walking in.
tarwheel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 12:53 PM   #41
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 7
Posts: 18,086
Room Service wash your kit every night ?.. it would take a big credit line to pay $200 a night + for that level of Hotel.
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 01:10 PM   #42
Miles2go
Zen Master
 
Miles2go's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: On the water in Western Washington
Bikes: More than a few.
Posts: 859
Quote:
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Room Service wash your kit every night ?.. it would take a big credit line to pay $200 a night + for that level of Hotel.
OK, I'll share my "secret" in this regard. THESE

For those of you link-shy, Andiamo cycling liners. Two of these weigh less than one pair of high quality cycling shorts and they dry out much faster. They're very well made too. I've had the same 3 pair many years and they still look and function like new.

IMPORTANT: Then, wash the day's biking liner in the hotel sink along with the rest of the day's clothes, wring it all out, place it flat on a towel, roll the towel up and walk on the rolled up towel. Flip the towel by 1/4 turn and walk on it again. Unroll, drape the now damp clothes for the night. Very rarely seen this not result in completely dry clothes by morning.

Cheers
__________________
Ron - Washington
The Loaded Touring Bike - Photo Gallery
Since 2005 - Worldwide - No Ads - Just Inspiration
Miles2go is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 05:40 PM   #43
Nick94804
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: A quiet place devoid of nazis telling me how I may express myself
Bikes: An ultra heavily moderated custom Merlin.
Posts: 137
All of those towels are your friend! I wore my bibs into the shower. The road grime that washed out of them, especially on wet, high traffic days was unbelievable. No way would I wear them two days in a row without washing them. I wasn't worried about bacteria, I just like starting the day in clean clothes.
Nick94804 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 05:48 PM   #44
niknak
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: San Jose, CA
Bikes:
Posts: 582
I agree with some of the others that one pair of bike shorts and one jersey is fine, especially if you're credit card touring. Washing clothes in the sink is a piece of cake. You even get free soap bars for scrubbing. I only brought one pair of padded underwear on a recent 3-week trip on the Idaho Hot Springs loop. After the day's ride, I'd pop over to the river and scrub the shorts on some rocks. No soap. Friction is all it takes to get the shorts clean enough for the next day. No saddle sores. No stink.

You also don't need three pairs of underwear and socks. One set of off-the-bike undies is plenty. Remember, you'll have access to a shower every day. I'd just bring two pairs of socks, so you have a fresh pair post-ride and one pair to clean.

Using a Revelate Viscacha sounds like a perfect bag for a credit card tour. It'll fit everything you need, and if it doesn't fit, you're bringing too much Since you're wearing a bike jersey, you'll also have a bit of storage on yourself too.
niknak is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 06:24 PM   #45
nun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Bikes: Rivendell Quickbeam, Rivendell Rambouillet, Rivendell Atlantis, Circle A town bike, De Rosa Neo Primato, Cervelo RS
Posts: 3,258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miles2go View Post
OK, I'll share my "secret" in this regard. THESE

For those of you link-shy, Andiamo cycling liners. Two of these weigh less than one pair of high quality cycling shorts and they dry out much faster. They're very well made too. I've had the same 3 pair many years and they still look and function like new.

IMPORTANT: Then, wash the day's biking liner in the hotel sink along with the rest of the day's clothes, wring it all out, place it flat on a towel, roll the towel up and walk on the rolled up towel. Flip the towel by 1/4 turn and walk on it again. Unroll, drape the now damp clothes for the night. Very rarely seen this not result in completely dry clothes by morning.

Cheers
For below the waist wear I take one pair of baggy cycling shorts (no pad), two pairs of Rapha merino padded underwear, a pair of lightweight convertible trousers and some polyester/spandex running tights.

Merino Boxers With Pad | Rapha

If I am camping or staying in a hotel I just take my underwear, socks and jersey into the shower with me and stomp on them, wring out well and hang them up to dry. If they aren't dry by morning I hang them on my saddlebag and they dry quickly as I ride. In a hotel the towel trick works well, I wring the clothes out and then put them inside a towel and wring that out too, twisting really hard. If for some reason I can't wear my baggy shorts I can ride in just the underwear because they look just like cycling shorts.....or I can ride in the shorts from my convertible trousers or the leggings
nun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 06:48 PM   #46
Machka 
Long Distance Cyclist
 
Machka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: I ride where the thylacine roamed!
Bikes: Lots
Posts: 45,525
You don't need any cycling kit on a tour at all. You could do the whole tour in capris or convertable pants and wicking T's or lightweight button-up shirts if you wanted.

So for a short credit card tour, one pair of cycling-specific shorts would be fine. And I'd leave the jersey at home.
Machka is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 07:12 PM   #47
nun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Bikes: Rivendell Quickbeam, Rivendell Rambouillet, Rivendell Atlantis, Circle A town bike, De Rosa Neo Primato, Cervelo RS
Posts: 3,258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
So for a short credit card tour, one pair of cycling-specific shorts would be fine. And I'd leave the jersey at home.
I agree. For short or long trips, I take two long sleeve, zippered non-cycling jerseys as they are very practical and versatile. One to ride in and one to change into at the end of the day.

Patagonia Men's CapileneŽ 2 Lightweight Baselayer Zip-Neck
nun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-14, 07:23 PM   #48
Nick94804
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: A quiet place devoid of nazis telling me how I may express myself
Bikes: An ultra heavily moderated custom Merlin.
Posts: 137
I'm a jersey geek. I like the pockets for my ID/Ins. Card/cash; and my cell phone...just in case I go down and in the process get separated from my bike.
Nick94804 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-14, 12:48 AM   #49
wheelinthai
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Bikes:
Posts: 317
I wash my cycling jersey and shorts every day. If you see the road grime washed off, you'll not tolerate unwashed cycling clothes. I usually have the guest house maid do the washing for me. Other wise, I'll look for area where college students live and there will be at least one shop that does laundry for students. I try to end my ride by noon, but not later than 2pm. This way, I have my clothes (not just cycling clothes) back by 6pm. If necessary, I'll do the washing in the wash basin myself, and they will be dry and ready next morning. I don't tour during the rainy season, and definitely not riding when it's raining. BTW this is in Thailand, where you can have your laundry done quickly, and cheap.
wheelinthai is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-14-14, 04:19 AM   #50
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Bikes:
Posts: 8,837
Quote:
Originally Posted by Machka View Post
You don't need any cycling kit on a tour at all. You could do the whole tour in capris or convertable pants and wicking T's or lightweight button-up shirts if you wanted.

So for a short credit card tour, one pair of cycling-specific shorts would be fine. And I'd leave the jersey at home.
I think this is especially true when you consider the relatively low daily mileage the OP proposed for their trip.
staehpj1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:53 PM.