Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Touring Have a dream to ride a bike across your state, across the country, or around the world? Self-contained or fully supported? Trade ideas, adventures, and more in our bicycle touring forum.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-16-14, 02:19 PM   #1
schlopartist
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Bikes:
Posts: 22
Rage Powersports - bike cargo trailer

Hi all,

Has anyone experience with these? Single Wheel Pull-Behind Bicycle Cargo Trailer with Cargo Bag by Rage Powersports

Pros?

Cons?


Thanks in advance!



Amazon.com : Single Wheel Pull-Behind Bicycle Cargo Trailer with Cargo Bag : Cargo Carrier Bike Trailers : Sports & Outdoors
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 41RkNihIllL.jpg (17.6 KB, 15 views)
schlopartist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-14, 03:02 PM   #2
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 7
Posts: 18,086
Had a BoB, sold it, not good as a cargo trailerIMO. was Going to try to build a Better Wheel , Thus I still have a 28 hole WTB Greaseguard Hub to sell

I prefer 2 wheel trailers, have a Burly, Co op made, Flat Bed, and a CarryFreedom City.

Last edited by fietsbob; 01-13-15 at 02:30 PM.
fietsbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-15, 03:41 PM   #3
Penny Farting
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Vancouver
Bikes: Precision PR6030; Kona Hahanna; Looking for a Pashley Fold-It SRAM 7
Posts: 5
Similar to the Aosom trailer. As with the Revolution trailer. Rage lacks the Aosom suspension system but steel frame is powder coated to prevent corrosin and comes with a better dry bag.
Penny Farting is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-15, 05:13 PM   #4
nun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Bikes: Rivendell Quickbeam, Rivendell Rambouillet, Rivendell Atlantis, Circle A town bike, De Rosa Neo Primato, Cervelo RS
Posts: 3,260
No experience, but why would you choose to increase your weight by 22 lbs by using a trailer?
nun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-15, 09:41 PM   #5
saddlesores
Senior Member
 
saddlesores's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Hainan, China
Bikes:
Posts: 1,501
Quote:
Originally Posted by nun View Post
No experience, but why would you choose to increase your weight by 22 lbs by using a trailer?
simple.....so you can carry even more stuff! like another 70 pounds if you follow the
manufacturer's label, even more if you like to live dangerously. maybe you need to carry
5 gallons of water or scuba gear or a grand piano?

i've used a bob....20,000 miles or so.....and liked it....i see a few good points about this one...

**it's a quarter the price. $80 instead of $300+.

**it folds flat, which means it could/should maybe fit in your cardboard bike box.
(but does that reduce strength, increase flex???)

**it's a helluva lot cheaper!

**the yoke thingie splits apart for flat folding, but also to use at handles when moving
the trailer.

**and finally, it's heaps less expensive.
saddlesores is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-15, 09:52 PM   #6
nun
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Bikes: Rivendell Quickbeam, Rivendell Rambouillet, Rivendell Atlantis, Circle A town bike, De Rosa Neo Primato, Cervelo RS
Posts: 3,260
Quote:
Originally Posted by saddlesores View Post
simple.....so you can carry even more stuff! like another 70 pounds if you follow the
manufacturer's label, even more if you like to live dangerously. maybe you need to carry
5 gallons of water or scuba gear or a grand piano?
Yeah, not what I'd do to enjoy touring....I think I'm out of this thread
nun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-15, 09:58 PM   #7
saddlesores
Senior Member
 
saddlesores's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Hainan, China
Bikes:
Posts: 1,501
why leave? you might learn something.

some people need to carry massive quantities of stuff. maybe locally you wanna carry a beer
keg to the beach. long-distance you might need a week's worth of food or 3-4 days worth of
water.

crzy folks on "feeshays" and carbon fiber rockets might find it better to pull a trailer than to
try and mount racks.
saddlesores is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-15, 11:22 PM   #8
RomansFiveEight 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Missouri
Bikes: 2014 Fuji Absolute 2.1; Wife: 2015 Specialized Sirrus
Posts: 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by nun View Post
Yeah, not what I'd do to enjoy touring....I think I'm out of this thread
Is it wrong for someone else to enjoy it differently?

I don't do bicycle touring (yet). But I do motorcycle touring. I've had comments about luggage on my bike. Comments, usually, from guys on sportbikes riding around town not far from their homes. While I'm 3,500 miles from home, and not intending to wear the same clothes every day for a couple of weeks! (I also bring along tools, my laptop, camera, etc.)

I can imagine a bicycle tourer might have the same goals. To have enough 'stuff' to get them through a long ride. Especially if it's a tour that ends up taking several days or weeks with overnight stops!
RomansFiveEight is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-15, 06:24 AM   #9
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Bikes:
Posts: 8,837
Quote:
Originally Posted by RomansFiveEight View Post
To have enough 'stuff' to get them through a long ride. Especially if it's a tour that ends up taking several days or weeks with overnight stops!
You will find that folks here have a pretty wide range of what they want to carry, but "Several days or weeks with overnight stops!" does not make much difference in how much I find I need to carry. I have gone coast to coast camping and cooking with a little more than half of the weight quoted in this thread for the empty trailer (is it really 22 pounds? I thought the BoB was 13 pounds or so).

I can see where a trailer might work well for some folks in some situations. A few of those are:
  1. Someone who wants to take a race bike and insists on carrying a medium heavy to heavy load.
  2. Someone who is going into an area with no food or water restock available for longer periods.
  3. Someone riding off road (MTB) and wants to be able to quickly detach the trailer to go off single tracking on technical trails unladen.
  4. Someone doing some kind of very unusual tour that required some special and unusual gear, like the guy who carried his gear to climb Everest, or the one who carried a WW kayak and paddling gear and went from WW river to WW river.
  5. Someone who takes a large dog on tour.
  6. Someone who wants to haul heavy stuff around home rather than use a car.

Just my opinion, but for me none of the first five apply very well for most touring, regardless of tour length, and are kind of special cases that I'd usually be inclined to avoid.

The 6th one doesn't really have much to do with touring.
staehpj1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-15, 09:21 AM   #10
gregjones 
Senior Member
 
gregjones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: West Georgia
Bikes: K2 Mod 5.0 Roadie, Fuji Commuter
Posts: 2,782
I didn't know if I would use a trailer or not and wasn't gonna pull a $350 trigger on a YAK to find out. I bought an Aosom for $69.99 (with shipping) off eBarf. The wheel bearings were sealed, sucked. $4.40 got a pair delivered to my mailbox.

I use it several times a week. I can't find anything at all to complain about it since I replaced the bearings, especially since I spent the savings on a Shower's Pass Commuter jacket. Better that being soaked and cold pulling a BOB.

Trailer without bag weighs thirteen pounds. Only ABOUT a two liter bottle of water more than several different popular sets of front and rear racks and 4 panniers----I've added it up several times with several different brands.
__________________
Current Bike Stages--Click PR Logo
PedalRoom
gregjones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-15, 09:36 AM   #11
gregjones 
Senior Member
 
gregjones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: West Georgia
Bikes: K2 Mod 5.0 Roadie, Fuji Commuter
Posts: 2,782
Quote:
Originally Posted by staehpj1 View Post
I have gone coast to coast camping and cooking with a little more than half of the weight quoted in this thread for the empty trailer (is it really 22 pounds? I thought the BoB was 13 pounds or so).
It says, on Amazon, that 22lbs is SHIPPING weight.

Number 1 & 6 on your list apply to me.
__________________
Current Bike Stages--Click PR Logo
PedalRoom

Last edited by gregjones; 01-13-15 at 09:40 AM. Reason: added a space
gregjones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-15, 09:46 AM   #12
cvskates 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: On my bike...
Bikes:
Posts: 384
7. Someone touring with a partner that has a medical condition and so carries all their gear for them.
cvskates is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-15, 10:07 AM   #13
staehpj1 
Senior Member
 
staehpj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Tallahassee, FL
Bikes:
Posts: 8,837
Quote:
Originally Posted by gregjones View Post
It says, on Amazon, that 22lbs is SHIPPING weight.
That makes more sense.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gregjones View Post
I didn't know if I would use a trailer or not and wasn't gonna pull a $350 trigger on a YAK to find out. I bought an Aosom for $69.99 (with shipping) off eBarf. The wheel bearings were sealed, sucked. $4.40 got a pair delivered to my mailbox.
Good to hear a bit more on that. While I don't see myself even considering one on my normal tours, given my minimalist preferences, I could imagine myself springing for one for use around home, for transportation to and from archery hunting locations, and just maybe for some special purpose tour.


Quote:
Originally Posted by gregjones View Post
Trailer without bag weighs thirteen pounds. Only ABOUT a two liter bottle of water more than several different popular sets of front and rear racks and 4 panniers----I've added it up several times with several different brands.
Truth be told If someone opts for the larger heavier Arkel panniers and Surly Nice Racks, I think the racks and bags can actually be noticeably heavier than the BoB, Rage, or Aosom trailers. On the other hand if you shop for racks and bags with light weight in mind you can go a good bit lighter than the trailer.

I wonder how the attachment hardware is for the Rage and the Aosom. I remember the Yakima Big Tow that I briefly owned having issues with that. Do they take the same skewer as the BoB?

BTW, being able to be stowed away flat would be a big plus for a trailer IMO. The BoB takes up a lot of storage space at home and is a hassle to ship or check as baggage. The ability to knock it down flat to take up less space is a very attractive feature.
staehpj1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-15, 12:17 PM   #14
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Bikes: Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
Posts: 17,694
Quote:
Originally Posted by saddlesores View Post
**it folds flat, which means it could/should maybe fit in your cardboard bike box.
(but does that reduce strength, increase flex???)
Until I saw this I would have said it's a BOB knockoff. But I now I don't think it rises to that level. The bolt on rails are going to make the trailer handle like a overcooked noodle. I have a trailer...a Yakima which is itself a bit of a BOB knockoff but of much better quality...and I'm not a huge fan. The tail wags the dog too much for my tastes. This trailer would wag the dog like an over enthusiastic Labrador.
__________________
Stuart Black
New! Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
New! Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.

Last edited by cyccommute; 01-24-15 at 09:22 AM.
cyccommute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-15, 02:26 PM   #15
Trikin'
Senior Member
 
Trikin''s Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Vacouver Island B.C. Canada
Bikes: Catrike Trail/Catrike Expedition
Posts: 276
I've been using a BOB trailer when I tour since 2010. I'm riding a tadpole trike so I want to keep the center of gravity lower. I've loaded for touring just with panniers and the tent sleeping bag on the rear rack and have felt this configuration somewhat top heavy. Distributing the load onto the trailer as well as using panniers evens out the weight. I hardy even know the trailer is there when riding on the flats. I've never had a jackknife or a feeling of being pushed into a curve while going downhill. I've installed a hub motor into the trailer wheel with the Lit-Ion battery mounted to the trailer deck, it assists me on the hills. I like the BOB for its light weight and superb load capability.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 8091261017_970ea18e46.jpg (81.6 KB, 20 views)
File Type: jpg Tour_.jpg (101.0 KB, 21 views)
File Type: jpg S6300704.jpg (90.5 KB, 18 views)
File Type: jpg result.jpg (40.0 KB, 26 views)

Last edited by Trikin'; 01-13-15 at 02:33 PM.
Trikin' is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-15, 07:18 AM   #16
Penny Farting
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: Vancouver
Bikes: Precision PR6030; Kona Hahanna; Looking for a Pashley Fold-It SRAM 7
Posts: 5
The shape of touring in the future, perhaps.
Penny Farting is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-15, 04:32 AM   #17
Rowan
Has opinion, will express
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Bikes:
Posts: 14,566
I think these are made by TW Bents in Taiwan and marketed under various brand names around the world.

I have one. I have used it for everyday use and touring... for touring behind my Ti road bike. It's durable, tows well if loaded properly, and despite the lightweight of the rear end of the Ti bike, I had no issues. The skewer is long enough to be used on bikes with wide and narrow rear dropout widths (although not Santana tandem width).

The bag is a bit lightweight, but it also has served its purposes for me. The fold-flat aspect is very handy when it comes to travel and storage.

Until something actually goes wrong with it, I see no real need to upgrade tyres or hub.
Rowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-15, 04:33 AM   #18
Rowan
Has opinion, will express
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Bikes:
Posts: 14,566
Quote:
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Until I saw this I would have said it's a BOB knockoff. But I now I don't think it rises to that level. The bolt on rails are going to make the trailer handle like a overcooked noodle. I have a trailer...a Yakima which is itself a bit of a BOB knockoff but of much better quality...and I'm not a huge fan. The tail wags the dog too much for my tastes. This trailer would wag the dog like an over enthusiastic Labrador.
It's a solid platform that has transported garden dirt and other materials for me. In other words, on this particular subject, you don't know what you are talking about.
Rowan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-15, 10:03 AM   #19
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Bikes: Some silver ones, a black one, a red one, an orange one and a couple of titanium ones
Posts: 17,694
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rowan View Post
It's a solid platform that has transported garden dirt and other materials for me. In other words, on this particular subject, you don't know what you are talking about.
It would be much more prone to twisting then a B.O.B. The B.O.B. has the same solid kind of platform but has welded frame members and more of them. The difference would be come immediately apparent in a side-by-side comparison.
__________________
Stuart Black
New! Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
New! Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-15, 11:19 AM   #20
boomhauer
Senior Member
 
boomhauer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 289
[QUOTE=staehpj1;17465620]You will find that folks here have a pretty wide range of what they want to carry, but "Several days or weeks with overnight stops!" does not make much difference in how much I find I need to carry. I have gone coast to coast camping and cooking with a little more than half of the weight quoted in this thread for the empty trailer (is it really 22 pounds? I thought the BoB was 13 pounds or so).

I can see where a trailer might work well for some folks in some situations. A few of those are:
  1. Someone who wants to take a race bike and insists on carrying a medium heavy to heavy load.
  2. Someone who is going into an area with no food or water restock available for longer periods.
  3. Someone riding off road (MTB) and wants to be able to quickly detach the trailer to go off single tracking on technical trails unladen.
  4. Someone doing some kind of very unusual tour that required some special and unusual gear, like the guy who carried his gear to climb Everest, or the one who carried a WW kayak and paddling gear and went from WW river to WW river.
  5. Someone who takes a large dog on tour.
  6. Someone who wants to haul heavy stuff around home rather than use a car.

7) Can't stand being away from their golf clubs while on tour.
boomhauer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:00 PM.