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  1. #1
    Senior Member Jarrett2's Avatar
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    Temporary bags for touring with carbon fiber bikes?

    I'd like to get into touring a bit in 2015. By touring, I mean ride 40-80 miles a day with overnight stops at hotels over the course of a long weekend or even a week possibly. No tents at this point. Just overnight stuff and clothes.

    If possible, I'd like to use my regular road bike, a carbon fiber Specialized Roubaix. I'm wondering if that is advisable and if so, are there some temporary racks/bags/panniers I could put on and take off of my Roubaix for these trips? Not something that needs to be installed long term, but rather something I could install and remove as needed.

    Are there such things?

    And is touring with a (25mm tire) CF road bike advisable?

  2. #2
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Think Bike trailer , no bike mods But changing the rear QR skewer.

    or the Bikepacking strap onto the frame bags, But A Trailer will be useful for carrying a Lot of stuff

    with any bike you have.. in the future.

    Touring is the Thing you do , not a specific bit of Kit.

  3. #3
    Senior Member bikemig's Avatar
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    No reason why you can't tour on your current bike and you may prefer it for light touring over a touring bike. Everything else being equal, I'd prefer a bit fatter tire (a 28 mm) and perhaps a triple but YMMV on this.

    Insofar as bags are concerned, you can find racks to work on a bike without eyelets but you're better off getting frame bags to save on weight for the kind of touring you are taking about.

    You can go new wave and high end from revelate designs, https://www.google.com/webhp?sourcei...late%20designs

    Old school is good too. Carradice makes classic saddlebags with some pretty neat attachment systems you may like.

    Or you can go cheap and practical by getting a large waterproof stuff sack or dry bag and mount it to the saddle and seatpost; there are DIY videos on youtube of people doing exactly that.


    Also the usual suspects when it comes to panniers may have bits and pieces you find useful. I like the small h-bar bag from Jandd as it has a map case and I can pop it off when locking the bike taking my valuables with me.

    Mountain Handle Pack IV

    I'm not sure you want a h-bar bag though if you have a carbon handlebar.
    Last edited by bikemig; 12-24-14 at 10:49 AM.

  4. #4
    nun
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
    I'd like to get into touring a bit in 2015. By touring, I mean ride 40-80 miles a day with overnight stops at hotels over the course of a long weekend or even a week possibly. No tents at this point. Just overnight stuff and clothes.

    If possible, I'd like to use my regular road bike, a carbon fiber Specialized Roubaix. I'm wondering if that is advisable and if so, are there some temporary racks/bags/panniers I could put on and take off of my Roubaix for these trips? Not something that needs to be installed long term, but rather something I could install and remove as needed.

    Are there such things?

    And is touring with a (25mm tire) CF road bike advisable?
    Definitely! You'll have a blast. I was considering a Specialized Roubaix for touring before I settled on the Cervelo RS.

    You actually don't need any racks to do what you propose. Take a look at "bikepacking" saddlebags or small Carradice saddlebags like the Barley.
    Here is a thread you will find interesting

    minimalist touring.. what would you carry?

    and some pictures of my bike with a minimal set of stuff for a long weekend credit carding.
    You might want to add a handlebar bag like an Ortlieb for a bit of extra room for an extra set of clothes. Here's a gear list

    Wallet with cards and money
    iPhone, earphones, backup battery and charger
    Multitool
    Spare tube and patch kit
    Pump
    Rain jacket
    Patagonia long sleeve shirt
    Running tights
    Socks
    Underwear
    Balaclava/beanie/buff
    Gloves
    Shower cap
    Small cable lock
    First aid kit
    Bic lighter
    Front and rear lights
    Emergency mylar blanket
    Toilet kit
    Pen and notebook
    Nylon backpack (in case I need to carry extra stuff)

    On bike or worn (not shown)
    2x 1L water bottles
    Sunglasses
    One set of clothes






    Last edited by nun; 12-24-14 at 10:48 AM.

  5. #5
    djb
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    there are a few companies that make rear racks that are regularly used on cf bikes, mount onto the brake caliper up top and use a skewer on the rear rear below, like this one, which can be bought for $40 can.

    Streamliner Racks - Racks - Products - Axiom Performance Gear

    you can use whatever panniers you want, but these ones are very light and may be enough for clothes and such that you need.

    Arkel - Dry-Lites - Ultralite Saddle bags - ONLY 454gr!!

    add a handlebar bag or something and you are perfectly set up for what you want to do.

    if you find you dont like doing this sort of thing, sell the stuff used afterwards, but even new we are talking $130 for rack and bags.

    I own these bags and they are completely waterproof, have a few niggles but that comes with the light design (go on with velcro, but in my experience stay on bike perfectly well)

    keeping the load weight within reason, there is no reason not to have a fun light tour with your bike from motel to motel.

  6. #6
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
    I'd like to get into touring a bit in 2015. By touring, I mean ride 40-80 miles a day with overnight stops at hotels over the course of a long weekend or even a week possibly. No tents at this point. Just overnight stuff and clothes.

    If possible, I'd like to use my regular road bike, a carbon fiber Specialized Roubaix. I'm wondering if that is advisable and if so, are there some temporary racks/bags/panniers I could put on and take off of my Roubaix for these trips? Not something that needs to be installed long term, but rather something I could install and remove as needed.

    Are there such things?

    And is touring with a (25mm tire) CF road bike advisable?
    Unless you plan to schlep a lot of unnecessary stuff I see no reason that bike shouldn't work fine. I'd do a camping and cooking tour with that bike. I went coast to coast in feb-mar 2012 on a road bike carrying 14 pounds of camping and cooking gear. I camped and cooked much of the time, was fine with sub freezing overnight lows, and fit it all in a couple stuff sacks that I strapped on a rear. I have since trimmed the load even further. So going a few days staying in hotels should be pretty easily doable with less gear.

    What will you be carrying? That will probably depend on what kind of off bike activities you expect to do (if any) and generally how minimal of an approach you are comfortable with. It will also depend on whether cold weather is possible. For me overnight stuff and clothes would easily fit in a handlebar bag or a modest sized seat bag. Heck I could get by with putting that stuff in a jersey pocket.

    My advice is to first pick your gear and clothing. I advise being ruthless in trimming the list. Once you know what you will be carrying, then and only then figure out how to best carry it. Possible options are:
    1. Very small panniers on a rack that attaches to the rear skewer and the brake bolt or a special seat post clamp.
    2. A similar rack with a dry bag(s) strapped on.
    3. Rackless bikepacking bags like those sold by Relevate
    4. A seat bag like the Carradice ones
    5. Possibly a very small light backpack
    6. If packing heavier a rack and front panniers (on the back) should work OK


    I wouldn't even consider taking enough to use regular full size panniers or a trailer for the kind of trip you describe unless you insist on packing really very heavy. Of the baggage I listed you can mix and match. For example with 12 pounds of camping and cooking gear and clothes I have split it equally between a bar roll, a seat bag, and a little backpack. That would be enough stuff for me to do a multi month trip camping and cooking. So you ought to be able to manage a hotel trip with that much or less if you are willing to pack carefully.

    Remember that with a room, washing out your bike clothes in the sink every day is possible and you should be able to get them mostly dry or damp at worst. A hint is to wrap them in a towel and wring out the water.

  7. #7
    Senior Member irwin7638's Avatar
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    I have used lightweight road bikes to tour over the past 40 years, I wouldn't recommend it, even with a steel bike and 25mm tires. It can be done, I've done it, but it's a more enjoyable experience with a heavier bike and larger tires. You will have fewer problems and be more comfortable. If you do use the road bike, I'd suggest a trailer. Keep the extra weight off the bike, it really wasn't designed for that.

    Marc
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  8. #8
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    There are rack top bags that have side pockets that fold down to be tiny panniers. If I wanted to do a credit card tour like you are with just one or two changes of clothes, rain gear, minimal other stuff, I would get one of those bags.

    And I would get one of those racks that clamp onto the seatpost. (If you have a carbon seatpost, replace that with a metal one for this trip.) If you used the pannier side pockets, the rack would also need the side pieces that prevent the panniers from swinging into the tire. I have used such a rack on my foldup bike. From that I can tell you that you have to have your weight in each pannier balanced, otherwise the rack might want to rotate on the seatpost so one side (the heavy side) rubs on the tire.

    If you might want to have the handlebars a bit higher, consider a different stem. Most long distance tourists have top of handlebars pretty close to top of saddle for height.

    If I was doing this type of trip, I would also have a handlebar bag. But most ultra light weight riders do not. Just mentioning it for consideration, but I do not know if you can attach a handlebar bag on that bike or not.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Jarrett2's Avatar
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    I do also have a Specialized (aluminum) Secteur with TRP disc brakes and 32 tires on it. I just really dislike its harsh ride after experiencing the CF Roubaix. I've considered trying to put a Specialized CG-R seatpost on it and make it my touring bike. Just don't want to find out 40 miles into a tour that its so harsh that it detracts from the ride.

  10. #10
    djb
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    Quote Originally Posted by irwin7638 View Post
    I have used lightweight road bikes to tour over the past 40 years, I wouldn't recommend it, even with a steel bike and 25mm tires. It can be done, I've done it, but it's a more enjoyable experience with a heavier bike and larger tires. You will have fewer problems and be more comfortable. If you do use the road bike, I'd suggest a trailer. Keep the extra weight off the bike, it really wasn't designed for that.

    Marc
    its fascinating how you can get such different opinions on a topic such as this. As most of us ride diff types of bikes, we all know that riding a lighter bike up hills is more enjoyable, well, easier anyway, and as for comfort, this really does depend on the bike and person. My dropbar bike, Tricross, is probably not that different in layout than the Roubaix, and is great riding all day, day after day. Sure, riding 25s or 28s (I ride 28s all the time) will be less cushy than 32s or 37s, but then the bike will be so much lighter it will have a very different feel to it.
    As for trailers, imagine how much weight a trailer weighs, and if this fellow uses common sense in packing, its easy to not have more than 15-20lbs total extra weight on the bike--so I guess it depends on his own weight, but 15lbs of clothes wont make a real difference to spoke issues, but it sure will be fun to ride a bike that weights 35lbs lets say, including his 15lbs of clothes and whatnot.

  11. #11
    Senior Member irwin7638's Avatar
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    The concern I have is mechanical more than comfort. I have had fewer wheel and tire issues to interrupt my vacation when I use a stout wheel and tire. I would suggest keeping the weight off the bike for that reason alone. The relaxed geometry, weight and larger tires of a touring bike absorb huge amounts of road vibration which would otherwise increase fatigue over the trip. Believe what you want, that has been my experience.

    Marc
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  12. #12
    nun
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    The OP is suggesting a credit card motel tour and you can do that with 10lbs of gear, probably less. Using a trailer would be very inconvenient and total over kill.

    It should be simple enough for you to get some gear together and you could even just put it in something like a Sea to Summit compression sack and strap it to the back of your saddle and seat post and do a test ride. Every time I go out for a days ride I take about 5lbs of stuff in a Barley saddlebag so going to 10lbs will be easy for you. I've ridden my Cervelo RS on 25mm tires on long tours and over some fairly rough off road stuff. It's not too good over soft stuff, but it's great for climbing. Two things you might want to watch are your wheels and gearing. I upgraded my bike's wheels to 32 spokes and changed my cassette to a 12/36 from a 12/28 to better match touring requirements, but if you are just doing a credit card tour a stock Roubaix will probably be perfect.

  13. #13
    nun
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    Quote Originally Posted by irwin7638 View Post
    The concern I have is mechanical more than comfort. I have had fewer wheel and tire issues to interrupt my vacation when I use a stout wheel and tire. I would suggest keeping the weight off the bike for that reason alone. The relaxed geometry, weight and larger tires of a touring bike absorb huge amounts of road vibration which would otherwise increase fatigue over the trip. Believe what you want, that has been my experience.

    Marc
    The Roubaix has a pretty relaxed geometry, it's not nearly as aggressive as a real road bike and an extra 10lbs over the rear wheel shouldn't be an issue.

  14. #14
    Senior Member bikemig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by irwin7638 View Post
    The concern I have is mechanical more than comfort. I have had fewer wheel and tire issues to interrupt my vacation when I use a stout wheel and tire. I would suggest keeping the weight off the bike for that reason alone. The relaxed geometry, weight and larger tires of a touring bike absorb huge amounts of road vibration which would otherwise increase fatigue over the trip. Believe what you want, that has been my experience.

    Marc
    + 1. We're talking about spending lots of time on the road at all different kinds of speeds and over various road conditions. You can do it just fine on a racing bike but more optimal road geometry and a fatter tire are big pluses.

  15. #15
    nun
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    Quote Originally Posted by irwin7638 View Post
    I have used lightweight road bikes to tour over the past 40 years, I wouldn't recommend it, even with a steel bike and 25mm tires. It can be done, I've done it, but it's a more enjoyable experience with a heavier bike and larger tires. You will have fewer problems and be more comfortable. If you do use the road bike, I'd suggest a trailer. Keep the extra weight off the bike, it really wasn't designed for that.

    Marc
    I agree that wider tires can be nice on a tour, particularly over soft ground and in the rain, but I find riding a modern CF frame far more comfortable than the steel frames I own. This might just be a personal thing, but I find it far less tiring to ride my Cervelo RS than my Rambouillet. I enjoy them both, but given a choice it would be the Cervelo.

    A CF cyclocross bike can fit wide tires and would be great for touring if the geometry was a bit more relaxed, but CF endurance type bikes now have relaxed geometries, clearance for 28mm tires and pretty low gearing (some have 12/32 cassettes) and they are great for light weight touring.
    Last edited by nun; 12-24-14 at 05:53 PM.

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    I agree with 'nun'. For a credit-card tour you should be able to fit everything into a saddlebag and/or handlebar bag and keep the weight down to about 10 extra pounds. That's insignificant in terms to extra stress on the bike - after all we don't go out and buy sturdier bikes just because we put on an extra 10 pounds over the holidays. A trailer would probably weigh 10 lbs. or more empty and makes sense if you're going to load it with 40+ lbs., but I wouldn't consider it for a lighter load.

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    nun just to complement you on a super rig truly fantastic.

  18. #18
    Senior Member c_m_shooter's Avatar
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    Handlebar bag and a medium seat bag should be all you need. There are some reasonably priced options at Velo Orange.
    May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.
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  19. #19
    Senior Member gregjones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by djb View Post
    there are a few companies that make rear racks that are regularly used on cf bikes, mount onto the brake caliper up top and use a skewer on the rear rear below, like this one, which can be bought for $40 can.

    Streamliner Racks - Racks - Products - Axiom Performance Gear
    I have a Streamliner rack. It's light and easy to remove. Axiom makes bags from small to large that are a 10 second remove/install with their system.

    The forward rack brace does attach at the caliper mount. I wasn't really keen about messing with the carbon part taking the rack off and on, let alone messing a bit with the caliper to get the brakes right again. I used a seatpost clamp with ears and made a different bracket that hangs from there. Two 5mm bolts and the skewer is all that required to get the rack off and on. I'm thinking about making slots out of the holes that the skewer goes through. Then it would just be a matter of loosening and readjusting the QR. Even easier.

    My trailer is 13lb and pulls great. But, the Streamliner with a medium bag should be less than five pounds and easier to live with for motel to motel hopping.
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  20. #20
    Senior Member Jarrett2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nun View Post
    The Roubaix has a pretty relaxed geometry, it's not nearly as aggressive as a real road bike...
    Zing!

  21. #21
    nun
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarrett2 View Post
    Zing!
    No Zing was meant.....a road bike like the Tarmac has a far more aggressive geometry than an endurance bike like the Roubaix. They are both great bikes, but all day on a Tarmac would stress me out.
    Last edited by nun; 12-24-14 at 09:25 PM.

  22. #22
    djb
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    I still stand by the reasoning that for credit card touring, along with a pump, a spare tube or two, a multitool and not much more (maybe some chain oil) the amount of clothes is going to be pretty basic, depending on the weather. Easily fitting into small light panniers if you go that route or whatever, and it is entirely reasonable to figure that all the various doohickies could be in the 15lb range tops. As mentioned, the range of rider weights in real life means that another 15lbs is not going to be a real problem for the rear wheel (my opinion anyway)

    I am fairly certain that a Roubaix rides fairly similarly to my Tricross, in terms of steering quickness etc, so if on reasonable roads, even 25s can be alright for comfort--but yes of course, on some really bad roads, my 28s can seem a bit harsh (and as nun says, on soft stuff and in the wet, 25 or 28s arent ideal). I have a friend who has a slow steering Trek 520 and when we switch bikes, I cant get over how it steers like a bus, and he cant get over how twitchy my bike is--so yes, personal preferences to how you want a bike to feel when riding are always going to be that--preferences and what you are comfortable with is not the same with everyone. I personally like a fast steering bike, but a Roubaix certainly isnt as twitchy as other frames.

  23. #23
    nun
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    Quote Originally Posted by djb View Post

    I am fairly certain that a Roubaix rides fairly similarly to my Tricross, in terms of steering quickness etc, so if on reasonable roads, even 25s can be alright for comfort--but yes of course, on some really bad roads, my 28s can seem a bit harsh (and as nun says, on soft stuff and in the wet, 25 or 28s arent ideal)
    I ride 25mm tire most of the time and when I get on 28mm now they seem enormous. I'd probably go with 28s if my Cervelo had more room for them, but much bigger than that and I'm sure I can feel the inertia of the heavier tire and I seldom go on ground that needs a really wide tire and the rolling resistance benefits above 28mm are diminishing. The last puncture I had on my 25mm ultra Gatorskins was 2 years ago.
    Last edited by nun; 12-24-14 at 10:41 PM.

  24. #24
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nun View Post
    I ride 25mm tire most of the time and when I get on 28mm now they seem enormous. I'd probably go with 28s if my Cervelo had more room for them, but much bigger than that and I'm sure I can feel the inertia of the heavier tire and I seldom go on ground that needs a really wide tire and the rolling resistance benefits above 28mm are diminishing. The last puncture I had on my 25mm ultra Gatorskins was 2 years ago.
    28 mm is as wide as I go these days even on my heavy touring bike. I don't like to be right at the limit of what the frame takes, so think 25 mm is about right for me for the very light type of touring that I do. It is nice to have a bit or wobble room in case a wheel gets knocked out of whack.

    I started the ST in 2012 with 23 mm gatorskin tires and when they wore out switched to 25 mm gatorskins. On the rough Texas chipseal the buzz was reduced a good bit with the 25 mm tires, but the 23 mm were not that big of a hardship.

    On the geometry and frame material choices... I find my aluminum and carbon fiber road bike supremely comfortable. I have ridden centuries on it and on my heavy touring bike and found the road bike to be more comfortable. I try to duplicate the aggressive position/posture of the road bike on the heavy touring bike. I'd definitely ride something like the OP's Roubaix on even long camping and cooking tours as long as I am packing very light.

    Given that the OP already has the Roubaix and wants to do short credit card tours, it seems like it would be a very weird choice to buy a heavy touring bike. The Roubaix actually sounds about as perfect for the task as I can think of.

  25. #25
    Senior Member staehpj1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregjones View Post
    I have a Streamliner rack. It's light and easy to remove. Axiom makes bags from small to large that are a 10 second remove/install with their system.
    I too own an Axiom Streamliner rack and really like it. If he is packing enough stuff to want/need a rack it may make sense. If it is a good fit for his needs I recommend it as well. The OP could do much worse, but it and panniers could be overkill depending on how much stuff he plans to carry.

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