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Old 01-28-16, 12:09 PM   #1
Trackliche
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Track Cycling Book Reviews

Okay boys and girls. Collectively, we've probably read every book there is to read about track cycling. Let's hear your thoughts on them.
I'll start:

The Price of Gold; Marty Nothstein: Four of five stars. The writing was pretty good, but simple in the way of most sports books. Definitely a very motivating read; Nothstein was a singleminded SOB. Goes a bit into his own and his friends' training, but mostly in broad strokes. Cool read.

The Anna Meares Story, Anna Meares: Ugh- awful. One of five stars. The writing is just abhorrent, and the anecdotes on which she focuses almost detract from the main story. Speaking of, the story (if you can look past the garbage writing) is good, but I'd rather read Carleton's version of it in a post on this forum. This book ain't worth the trouble.

The Autobiography, Chris Hoy: Four of five stars. Pretty good read. Definitely a lot of history about Team GB and their rise to glory with Chris et al. Well written, easy to follow and quick to read. Not much about training, but shows his commitment to the sport and whatnot very well.

Between The Lines, Victoria Pendleton: Still in the middle of this one. I started it before the Meares book, then put it down because I thought Pendleton's initial chapter was too touchy feely and emotionally depressing. After the travesty of Meares' book, I picked this one back up and really like it. After the first chapter things get very interesting. The writing style is impressive; down to earth, extremely relatable, and has explained some of the simple concepts of cycle racing (I.e. Drafting) more succinctly and completely than I've ever seen. Really like this book so far.
EDIT: I've finished this one. It was 4/5 stars. Lots of insight into VP's mind- pretty wild. She got a little *****y-focused on Anna Meares at times, but that should be expected. I was really blown by the obstacles she felt she had within British Cycling. One must keep in mind that she has some mental issues, but her take is her take- that's why we're reading her book!

Add, comment, modify!

TC

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Old 01-28-16, 01:29 PM   #2
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Maybe I should write a book?!

Heroes, Villains & Velodromes: Chris Hoy & Britain's Track Cycling Revolution
by Richard Moore

From Amazon:
Quote:
Heroes, Villains and Velodromes reveals how an elite athlete, Chris Hoy, lives, breathes and pushes the boundaries of his sport. How does he do it? And why? What drives him to put his body through the physical and mental hurdles to become the best in the world? This is also the story of an extraordinary year in the life of an extraordinary sportsman, one which started with his best-ever world championships in Mallorca—where, for the first time in his career, he became a double world champion—continued with his attempt on the world kilometer record in La Paz, Bolivia, went on to Japan where he spent three months riding the crazy keirin circuit, before returning to training at the world-class Manchester velodrome in the buildup to the 2008 Beijing Olympics.By shadowing Hoy through a season with the British track cycling team, author Richard Moore has gained an unembellished insight into the mind of a world champion. He has also attained unprecedented levels of access to the key members of the all-conquering British team (which smashed all records and dominated the 2007 world championships) and support staff, including top coaches, world-renowned psychiatrists, doctors (where the subject of drug abuse is an ever-present shadow), and the pivotal characters behind the scenes. Combining his forensic knowledge of the cycling world with his acclaimed skills as a tenacious investigative journalist, Moore captures the mood of the British team and explores an area of professional sport that has rarely been seen before.
This was a pretty good read to me. The writing is about 1/2 about the rise of the British Cycling program and 1/2 about Hoy.




The Chimp Paradox: The Mind Management Program to Help You Achieve Success, Confidence, and Happiness by Dr. Steve Peters

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Do you sabotage your own happiness and success? Are you struggling to make sense of yourself? Do your emotions sometimes dictate your life?

Dr. Steve Peters explains that we all have a being within our minds that can wreak havoc on every aspect of our lives—be it business or personal. He calls this being "the chimp," and it can work either for you or against you. The challenge comes when we try to tame the chimp, and persuade it to do our bidding.
Why is this relevant? Dr. Peters was the British Cycling staff sports psychologist. Jamie Staff tweeted about this book years ago when he was head coach of the USA cycling team.

I learned a lot by reading this book. It basically helps you manage your mental state and keep it where you want it to be for sports, work, personal, etc...
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Old 01-29-16, 06:45 AM   #3
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The chimp paradox has changed my life on & off the track. It describes how to manage your irrational thoughts (chimp) and break them down into more manageable segments by thinking like a human.

Off the field, I was quite shy and would over think a lot. I ended up having a small amount of medication for depression/stress/anxiety. This book (along with therapy for more underlying issues) has helped me to rationalise everything, be more calm and confident in social situations. This made me realise that you can be in the best shape physically, but if you're not there mentally, you won't be able to compete.

Dr Peters has also helped British Cycling, Pendleton, Ronnie O'Sullivan (snooker player) and Liverpool FC as a psychologist.


Joe Friels training Bible will no doubt be discussed in this thread, which is a great book about periodisation, training plans testing etc.

I'd also recommend Track Cycling: Training and Racing: Amazon.co.uk: Michael Mahesh: 9781494464899: Books as a supplement to the training bible, as Friel's book concentrates more on criterium/road race
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Old 01-29-16, 07:26 AM   #4
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Hmm, maybe I should go read that one. I've got it kicking around on a shelf/in a box somewhere.
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Old 02-15-16, 03:44 PM   #5
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Sounds like i need to read the Chimp Paradox.
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Old 02-15-16, 03:52 PM   #6
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The Price of Gold
www.
amazon.
com/
The-Price-Gold-Triumph-Olympic
/dp/1609613376


Link wasn't working. So I had to orient the address like this.

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Old 02-15-16, 06:31 PM   #7
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I just ordered the Chimp Paradox on Kindle --- I am self employed and spend a ton of time doing paperwork out of my home office ---- i am amazingly un-productive on my office days -

If i got more done with my available time, i'd have more time for training or other pursuits



But on topic --- I read Obree's book and it was a worthwhile read as well
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Old 02-15-16, 11:37 PM   #8
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"Reg Harris - The Rise and Fall of Britain's greatest cyclist"
By Robert Dineen
Ebury Press.
Contains some interesting info on Pro racing.

"The Hour"
By Michael Hutchinson
Yellow Jersey Press
An entertaining book.
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Old 02-15-16, 11:47 PM   #9
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I mentioned this in another thread.

But The Rider by Time Krabbe is really good.

It basically takes you through a first-person account of an all-day road race and the mind games that are involved. Basically, Man vs Machine, Man vs God (the environment), Man vs Himself, and Man vs Man all in one.

It was recommended to me when I was dealing with the lows training for a full year and having had very disappointing results. I was upset, frustrated, and a mix of "F THIS!". This book helped me understand that all cyclists/athletes who do something long enough have the same ups and downs.
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Old 02-16-16, 07:49 AM   #10
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I just ordered the Chimp Paradox on Kindle --- I am self employed and spend a ton of time doing paperwork out of my home office ---- i am amazingly un-productive on my office days -

If i got more done with my available time, i'd have more time for training or other pursuits

For that you'll need the 4 hour work week. The 4-Hour Work Week: Escape the 9-5, Live Anywhere and Join the New Rich: Amazon.co.uk: Timothy Ferriss: 9780091929114: Books
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Old 02-16-16, 08:13 AM   #11
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I mentioned this in another thread.

But The Rider by Time Krabbe is really good.

It basically takes you through a first-person account of an all-day road race and the mind games that are involved. Basically, Man vs Machine, Man vs God (the environment), Man vs Himself, and Man vs Man all in one.

It was recommended to me when I was dealing with the lows training for a full year and having had very disappointing results. I was upset, frustrated, and a mix of "F THIS!". This book helped me understand that all cyclists/athletes who do something long enough have the same ups and downs.
"The Rider" is fantastic!

I'd like to recommend both of Joe Parkin's books, "A Dog in a Hat," and "Come & Gone." Even though they've nothing to do with track cycling, except that he mentions the word "Keirin" once, in "Come & Gone." :-p

Joe's experiences in the Belgian peloton are interesting, and vastly different than his experiences in America. I found the two very intriguing.
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Old 02-24-16, 02:28 PM   #12
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Good recommends on this one.
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Old 02-25-16, 06:22 AM   #13
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No Brakes!

I really like "No Brakes". Great history and photos.
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Old 02-25-16, 07:39 AM   #14
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I read "Gold" by Chris Cleave a couple years ago. It was a pretty fun read. Just a meaningless modern novel, by and large, but oh-so-cool to see it set against the backdrop of women's track sprinting. Definitely recommend.

TC
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Old 05-04-16, 03:04 AM   #15
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Can anyone recommend books that address training for the track athlete? I'm quite comfortable with the gym side of it (BSc in Exercise Science), but I'm not too sure on how to build training routines in the track itself. More specifically programs for those competing in the sprint categories.

The literature on track cycling is pretty limited and there seems to be little that directly looks at track training programs.

Any help will be welcome! Cheers
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Old 05-04-16, 05:21 AM   #16
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Up! Up! Up! ? Up! Up! Up! An introduction to track sprint cycling
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Originally Posted by Frederico View Post
Can anyone recommend books that address training for the track athlete? I'm quite comfortable with the gym side of it (BSc in Exercise Science), but I'm not too sure on how to build training routines in the track itself. More specifically programs for those competing in the sprint categories.

The literature on track cycling is pretty limited and there seems to be little that directly looks at track training programs.

Any help will be welcome! Cheers
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Old 05-04-16, 05:32 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Frederico View Post
Can anyone recommend books that address training for the track athlete? I'm quite comfortable with the gym side of it (BSc in Exercise Science), but I'm not too sure on how to build training routines in the track itself. More specifically programs for those competing in the sprint categories.

The literature on track cycling is pretty limited and there seems to be little that directly looks at track training programs.

Any help will be welcome! Cheers
Everyone seems to recommend Up!Up!Up!, easily found online and a wealth of information. One of the most detailed training manuals I've seen, but fairly out of date now, was Agonistic Cycling, the manual of the italian Federation in the mid-1980s. It is plainly done and broken down to events (road and track), training types, age groups and the yearly cycle. It included lap split charts for various sized tracks and strategy sheets for such events as team pursuit. I've attached a few shots of pages to give you an idea. It was the standard at a time when training information was very hard to come by... and a lot of the info holds up, IMHO.



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Old 05-05-16, 06:11 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Frederico View Post
Can anyone recommend books that address training for the track athlete? I'm quite comfortable with the gym side of it (BSc in Exercise Science), but I'm not too sure on how to build training routines in the track itself. More specifically programs for those competing in the sprint categories.

The literature on track cycling is pretty limited and there seems to be little that directly looks at track training programs.

Any help will be welcome! Cheers
There is a lot of training principle crossover from sprint running. How you do it depends and what you body responds to depends as well. You will see some reference to Charlie Francis in UpUpUp these days and his books may be a good addition to your reading. UpUpUp is possibly the best track sprint cycling resource there is period.
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Old 05-05-16, 07:28 PM   #19
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Speaking of Up! Up! Up!, wasn't it supposed to be a printed book and the blog simply the running notes for the book? Or something like that?
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Old 05-05-16, 07:57 PM   #20
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Speaking of Up! Up! Up!, wasn't it supposed to be a printed book and the blog simply the running notes for the book? Or something like that?
Indeed, that seemed to be the original intention, although having been playing cycling for a while now, and the evolution of ideas in training, especially for track sprinting, I think the current format is the best idea. A book is a stagnation in time, where there seem to be a lot of new developments in the world of track sprinting over the past few years.
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Old 05-08-16, 01:55 AM   #21
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Thanks for the recommendations
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Old 05-08-16, 04:41 PM   #22
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I was trying to read upupup again, but I cannot open the page.
Is is just me that experiencing this problem?
I tried with chrome and safari
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Old 05-08-16, 06:16 PM   #23
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Works for me
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Old 05-08-16, 11:40 PM   #24
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Works for me
I think their was a problem with internet connection because of weather
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