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Track Cycling: Velodrome Racing and Training Area Looking to enter into the realm of track racing? Want to share your experiences and tactics for riding on a velodrome? The Track Cycling forums is for you! Come in and discuss training/racing, equipment, and current track cycling events.

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Old 03-10-17, 12:20 PM   #1
tararogue
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New to a track team this year, 8 weeks to train.

Hi all!

I'm from Minneapolis and started riding track last year at the outdoor velodrome we have here (which is amazing and so much fun). This will be the first year I'm racing so I've joined a team (and I'm investing in my first ever bike, which is daunting - I have a budget of about 1k, and I think I'll likely go with an All-City Thunderdome).

I'm trying to get my body ready. I'm in decent shape and have been riding my trainer consistently over the winter, but I'm ready to kick things up a notch over the past two months and kick my own ass. Spin class seems to be helpful for me in the areas I need to work on - sprints, relaxing my shoulders and keeping my form in check. But I need strength training.

Has anyone done the British Cycling 8 week programme listed on their site? Any feedback?

Any other feedback is also always appreciated. Thanks!
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Old 03-10-17, 03:59 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by tararogue View Post
Hi all!

I'm from Minneapolis and started riding track last year at the outdoor velodrome we have here (which is amazing and so much fun). This will be the first year I'm racing so I've joined a team (and I'm investing in my first ever bike, which is daunting - I have a budget of about 1k, and I think I'll likely go with an All-City Thunderdome).

I'm trying to get my body ready. I'm in decent shape and have been riding my trainer consistently over the winter, but I'm ready to kick things up a notch over the past two months and kick my own ass. Spin class seems to be helpful for me in the areas I need to work on - sprints, relaxing my shoulders and keeping my form in check. But I need strength training.

Has anyone done the British Cycling 8 week programme listed on their site? Any feedback?

Any other feedback is also always appreciated. Thanks!
How much time did you get on the track last year?

You probably shouldn't look to be in your best form on day-1 of your racing season. At DLV (when I raced) we called our normal weekly racing "training races" as they were meant to be training for bigger events later in the year (even though we kept score at the training races). The "bigger events" depend on what your goal is for the season, velodrome championships, state finals, regionals, nationals, world cup, world championships, or Olympics (yes, Olympians often race in local weekly races).

So, the dates of your "big events" are when you need to be in your top form. 8 weeks of focus training comes out to being only 2 or 3 training blocks which would be right at the beginning of an annual program.

If you don't have any goals in particular, maybe work on:

- Cleaning up your diet.
- Riding a few days/week to gain fitness and train your body.
- Gym 2-3 days a week on a basic complete body program (not just legs)
- Do the above for maybe 5 days/week with 2 days of rest somewhere.
- On the track, race as much as you can. Even races that you don't like. You are in it for experience, not trying to win everything. Learn from your teammates. Help your teammates. They should be able to teach you.

Also, have a look at this thread, if you haven't already: https://www.bikeforums.net/track-cyc...ack-racer.html

Lastly, asking for a specific training program via a message board is problematic for several reasons.
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Roadies can run tempo all year as that's what humans were designed for. If you want to be a cheetah, lay around and lick your paws more.
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Old 03-10-17, 07:00 PM   #3
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Hi all!

I'm from Minneapolis and started riding track last year at the outdoor velodrome we have here (which is amazing and so much fun). This will be the first year I'm racing so I've joined a team (and I'm investing in my first ever bike, which is daunting - I have a budget of about 1k, and I think I'll likely go with an All-City Thunderdome).

I'm trying to get my body ready. I'm in decent shape and have been riding my trainer consistently over the winter, but I'm ready to kick things up a notch over the past two months and kick my own ass. Spin class seems to be helpful for me in the areas I need to work on - sprints, relaxing my shoulders and keeping my form in check. But I need strength training.

Has anyone done the British Cycling 8 week programme listed on their site? Any feedback?

Any other feedback is also always appreciated. Thanks!
Welcome to the sport! The NSC track is filled with good people, a great community. It's a great place to learn and develop. I just left Minneapolis this past summer - racing at the NSC was my favorite part of living there for 6 years.

A few thoughts about your post: You may have 8 weeks until the start of the season, but you have another 12 weeks to train during the season. People tend to get stronger throughout the season as they get more races in their legs and develop. Think about the season as a long period during which to learn, improve, get faster, and learn lessons that you can apply next offseason.

You say you need strength training - how do you know? You might not. While a lot of track racers lift weights and train in the gym (it can be helpful to overcome weaknesses or limitations), it's not a necessary component of starting out.

You'll make the biggest gains by riding, racing, and working on hard efforts. Monday Night structured training at the NSC is a good opportunity to do hard, track-specific training.
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Old 03-11-17, 07:22 PM   #4
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How much time did you get on the track last year?

Lastly, asking for a specific training program via a message board is problematic for several reasons.
hey! I appreciate the helpful feedback! But this comment feels a little unnecessarily snide. This is a forum. I was looking for input and "feedback," not for an A to Z training regimen, just sharing ideas. Thanks!
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Old 03-11-17, 07:26 PM   #5
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Welcome to the sport! The NSC track is filled with good people, a great community. It's a great place to learn and develop. I just left Minneapolis this past summer - racing at the NSC was my favorite part of living there for 6 years.

A few thoughts about your post: You may have 8 weeks until the start of the season, but you have another 12 weeks to train during the season. People tend to get stronger throughout the season as they get more races in their legs and develop. Think about the season as a long period during which to learn, improve, get faster, and learn lessons that you can apply next offseason.

You say you need strength training - how do you know? You might not. While a lot of track racers lift weights and train in the gym (it can be helpful to overcome weaknesses or limitations), it's not a necessary component of starting out.

You'll make the biggest gains by riding, racing, and working on hard efforts. Monday Night structured training at the NSC is a good opportunity to do hard, track-specific training.
This is all immensely helpful. Thank you! Very good point about getting stronger as the season goes on. I've never done anything like this before and that provides some clarity.

My upper body could use some strengthening. My arms are spindly things that could just use a bit more strength. For now I'm strengthening up there around 1-2 days a week.

Sorry to hear you're leaving town! You're not going to Wisconsin, by any chance, are you?
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Old 03-11-17, 08:54 PM   #6
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Any other feedback is also always appreciated. Thanks!
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hey! I appreciate the helpful feedback! But this comment feels a little unnecessarily snide. This is a forum. I was looking for input and "feedback," not for an A to Z training regimen, just sharing ideas. Thanks!

Maybe it's not

My comment wasn't meant to be snide.

I've been on this forum for (jesus) over 11 years and just about every track season a new racer* asks for a training program.

*we were all newbies once. I did. I asked about training programs on Fixed Gear Fever when it was around.

Your post is asking about a training program to get you ready for the start of the season. You asked for reviews of the British Cycling program.

My last sentence falls squarely in your "any other feedback?" category. Maybe I was a little early with it. But, I'm sure you are wondering, "What should I do to train?" And asking a cycling forum how to be a better bike racer is like asking a soccer forum how to be a better soccer player. It's a big question with lots of answers and if you try to do what all of the people who answer say, you'll spin in circles (although track racing is all about spinning in circles...get it? Spinning cranks in a circular velodrome )
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Old 03-11-17, 09:01 PM   #7
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This is all immensely helpful. Thank you! Very good point about getting stronger as the season goes on. I've never done anything like this before and that provides some clarity.

My upper body could use some strengthening. My arms are spindly things that could just use a bit more strength. For now I'm strengthening up there around 1-2 days a week.

Sorry to hear you're leaving town! You're not going to Wisconsin, by any chance, are you?
Nope, I moved to Philadelphia and now race at the T-Town Velodrome an hour or so north of there. But I left my heart in the NSC infield.

Gotcha about the arms. Yup, some upper body and core strength can really help cycling. I know some people who swear by planks.

As for your original question - I don't know the 8-week BC program, but I recall browsing it and thinking it looked decent. If you're new to bike racing, the things that have the greatest effect are regularity and intensity. So, it almost doesn't matter what the training plan is - as long as it has you riding regularly and going hard sometimes, you'll see gains. In fact, you might see *great* gains. Beginners are those that make the greatest leaps. It's later, when you start to plateau, that training plans get really in-depth and complicated and hit-or-miss.
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Old 03-11-17, 10:26 PM   #8
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Maybe it's not

My comment wasn't meant to be snide.

I've been on this forum for (jesus) over 11 years and just about every track season a new racer* asks for a training program.

*we were all newbies once. I did. I asked about training programs on Fixed Gear Fever when it was around.

Your post is asking about a training program to get you ready for the start of the season. You asked for reviews of the British Cycling program.

My last sentence falls squarely in your "any other feedback?" category. Maybe I was a little early with it. But, I'm sure you are wondering, "What should I do to train?" And asking a cycling forum how to be a better bike racer is like asking a soccer forum how to be a better soccer player. It's a big question with lots of answers and if you try to do what all of the people who answer say, you'll spin in circles (although track racing is all about spinning in circles...get it? Spinning cranks in a circular velodrome )
Ha! I get it.

Right on, dude. I totally get what you're saying. I guess I was asking a forum as opposed to an "expert" because I wanted feedback from people with various experiences, interest levels and backgrounds. I am totally okay with lots of answers, so I guess I wasn't looking to do what everyone suggested, but rather looking to dig in more on my own with any information or suggestions that were shared with me.

I am still absolutely petrified to race - cycling has always been my only sporting passion, and team sports and I have always made me feel quite inadequate. So, I'm just looking to educate myself with different perspectives to explore.

Oh, but to answer your question - I've only been riding for about 1 season. And that was leisurely, on my own, following an introductory clinic. I'll be retaking that clinic in May with my new team. I just feel like I have so much to learn, it can be a little overwhelming.

Thank you for this thoughtful response!
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Old 03-12-17, 01:55 AM   #9
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Ha! I get it.

Right on, dude. I totally get what you're saying. I guess I was asking a forum as opposed to an "expert" because I wanted feedback from people with various experiences, interest levels and backgrounds. I am totally okay with lots of answers, so I guess I wasn't looking to do what everyone suggested, but rather looking to dig in more on my own with any information or suggestions that were shared with me.

I am still absolutely petrified to race - cycling has always been my only sporting passion, and team sports and I have always made me feel quite inadequate. So, I'm just looking to educate myself with different perspectives to explore.

Oh, but to answer your question - I've only been riding for about 1 season. And that was leisurely, on my own, following an introductory clinic. I'll be retaking that clinic in May with my new team. I just feel like I have so much to learn, it can be a little overwhelming.

Thank you for this thoughtful response!
At this point, fitness will likely not be your limiting factor. Experience will be.

Your races in the beginner ranks will be won and lost by 10, 20, or 30s. Not 1s or less like in the higher ranks.

Usually, the guy/girl with the most (relative) experience wins.

Chances are, you are gonna do the silly things like we all did:

- Go out too hard too early...and die trying.
- Chase everyone that tries to break away...and die trying.
- Do the final sprint too early...and die trying.
- Follow the wrong wheel...and die trying.
- (see a pattern here?)

But that's OK. We all did it.

Your goal isn't to win races (winning is a bonus). Your goal is to get time in the saddle on the track and to gain the comfort that you are aware that you are lacking. It will come. You get the willies now when your ride at 22mph with someone on either side of you. In a few weeks, you'll be rolling at +30mph, full-gas and be totally comfortable.

In order to prepare, you can do basic fitness training so you don't get so gassed so early. Basically, build aerobic and anaerobic capacity that gets your heart rate up really high. Basically, interval training with proper recovery in-between.

Maybe get a heart rate monitor.

In my first season of racing where I raced everything, I noticed that my HR was pegged in every race.

1 minute heart rate recovery is a good training metric.
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Old 03-12-17, 01:59 AM   #10
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Further, I think monitoring one's HR is especially beneficial for new racers. Many don't know what it feels like to "burn a match" and what the consequences are. Your HR will let you know when a match got burned.

Then you have to recover on the bike and prepare to burn another one.

Your HR will tell this story.

Power can, too. But, power meters just show more detail. They show precisely how you burned the match. Your HR is about 10s behind the match being burned.

You can see your HR with any form of training (gym, running, treadmill, trainer, bike, etc...)

A lot of the training I got from really good coaches was around HR, not power meters (even though I owned a power meter).
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Old 03-12-17, 06:44 PM   #11
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hey! I appreciate the helpful feedback! But this comment feels a little unnecessarily snide. This is a forum. I was looking for input and "feedback," not for an A to Z training regimen, just sharing ideas. Thanks!
Didn't think it was snide, just pointing out that there are many, many different variables. For instance, you started in the velodrome last year, but what previous bike experience do you have? Were/are you a Cat 3 or better roadie or expert level mountain biker? Do you do group rides currently? You said you had spindly arms, so starting a weight training program may not be the best for you right now. Remember, you can't do it all at once. By the way, you never mentioned what kind of racing you will be doing, endurance vs sprint has a totally different approach for seasoned racers. For beginners, quality bike time is one of the best things you can do....group rides at a higher tempo, solo rides with lots of jumps and flying 250's, 500's and kilos.

If you do points races, doing a group ride at 100+ rpm and being the asshat that always accelerates off the front (jumps) can be very useful. Not so useful for a sprinter. As said before, do lots of races with the mindset that you aren't going to win.....you're just going to watch, follow wheels, learn and finish with the group. Once you do that a few times and get comfortable, you can start thinking about your race strategy and ways to win.
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Old 03-12-17, 07:58 PM   #12
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Didn't think it was snide, just pointing out that there are many, many different variables. For instance, you started in the velodrome last year, but what previous bike experience do you have? Were/are you a Cat 3 or better roadie or expert level mountain biker? Do you do group rides currently? You said you had spindly arms, so starting a weight training program may not be the best for you right now. Remember, you can't do it all at once. By the way, you never mentioned what kind of racing you will be doing, endurance vs sprint has a totally different approach for seasoned racers. For beginners, quality bike time is one of the best things you can do....group rides at a higher tempo, solo rides with lots of jumps and flying 250's, 500's and kilos.

If you do points races, doing a group ride at 100+ rpm and being the asshat that always accelerates off the front (jumps) can be very useful. Not so useful for a sprinter. As said before, do lots of races with the mindset that you aren't going to win.....you're just going to watch, follow wheels, learn and finish with the group. Once you do that a few times and get comfortable, you can start thinking about your race strategy and ways to win.
Wellllll, variables vs. problematic...yeah.

I'm a road cyclist. I mostly ride solo, so all of this is new for me. I do recognize that at times I'm totally trying to boil the ocean and learn all the things, when realistically I don't know what I don't know. I'm a cat. 5. I'm a baby duck who has a lot of passion and drive, and I'm just mostly curious about everything right now. I also know any expectations will be tossed out as soon as I start riding again.

Our team plans on doing a bunch of group rides together to get used to one another's riding style and to get more acquainted with riding with others. I'm definitely not focused on winning right now - I want to learn how to ride well and ride safely.
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Old 03-12-17, 08:28 PM   #13
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........... I'm a cat. 5. .................
Take a track certification class; that will jump you to cat. 4. At my local Velodrome cert class is two days and taught by an experienced rider who gives out lots of tips to new track riders. So check out you local velodromes for cert classes. Most tracks wont let you train or race as a cat.5.
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Old 03-12-17, 08:30 PM   #14
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Take a track certification class; that will jump you to cat. 4. At my local Velodrome cert class is two days and taught by an experienced rider who gives out lots of tips to new track riders. So check out you local velodromes for cert classes.
I've already taken it and I'm taking it again with my new team in May. I guess I didn't realize that jumped you to cat. 4?
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Old 03-12-17, 09:18 PM   #15
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I'm a road cyclist. I mostly ride solo, so all of this is new for me.
Well, if you are a road cyclist, then track racing will likely be more sprinting than you may be accustomed to. Recall that a road "sprinter" (think: Mark Cavendish) is considered to be a track "enduro".

Maybe on your road rides, monitor your cadence. Many casual roadies grind around 80-90 RPM on their rides. On the track, your optimal gearing will put your cruising cadence at around 95-100 rpm and you will sprint (e.g. final lap of a race) at 120 or more rpm.
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Old 03-12-17, 09:58 PM   #16
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My 2c worth is if you're a road rider, get out on the road and race, with a preference to crit racing. Also if you ride a bit on road, you will get the most out of riding with a bunch, and adding to that, a bunch that pushes your ability and has shorter 1.5-2hr rides. The shorter road rides allow the intensity to be increased and as you get better, then the intensity should encourage quicker recovery. You can also source trainer drills to aid recovery. One I was given was: 4min easy, 2min TT (90-100rpm hold hard enough to hurt, not hard enough to cook you), 4min easy, 4x 15sec flat out with 30s recovery. Rinse and repeat as many times as you want/can.

Strength, if you've got the time and the inclination, go at it. But remember it's not a must do and you can do some very high quality strength work on the bike.

Finally, spin classes...... be wary of them as a lot of spin type classes won't actually help you on the bike. Always have it in your head what you would actually do on a bike and try not to step outside of that. Spin classes are designed to get people fit by riding a bike. They are, as a general rule, not aimed at people that actually ride bikes.

Oh yeah, and have fun!
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Old 03-12-17, 11:34 PM   #17
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I've already taken it and I'm taking it again with my new team in May. I guess I didn't realize that jumped you to cat. 4?
Check out USA Cycling rule 1E4(a) for details.
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Old 03-18-17, 07:40 AM   #18
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I am still absolutely petrified to race - cycling has always been my only sporting passion, and team sports and I have always made me feel quite inadequate. So, I'm just looking to educate myself with different perspectives to explore.
There is no need to worry! The track cycling is IMO the most supportive community when it comes to racing bikes. The fact that you get to spend one night a week all summer racing with the same people really drives that home. To put a cherry on top, when I visited NSC last June, it was clear that the culture of your track is on another level when it comes to positivity.
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Old 03-19-17, 09:03 PM   #19
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never forget leg speed.... Rollers are you friend, they will help you practice spinning at stupidly high cadences (i will often hit 135-140+ in a race and 220 on the rollers) while not bouncing around.
As a roadie 120 is considered stupid fast.

There are two schools of thought, push a monster gear and have a slow acceleration or push an easier gear and have the jump but limit your top end speed.

In the lower grades monster gears are not required and you'll just blow your knees out.



OH and there is no match for the tactics that only experience can give.
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