Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    cxmagazine dot com pitboss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    WI
    My Bikes
    Titus road, Fort CX
    Posts
    8,270
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Zipp 909 cog compatibility

    Hey all -
    I checked the Zipp site (http://www.zipp.com/products/wheels/909/909_tubular/) and surfed around a bit, but wanted to know anyone that runs a 909 or has knowledge on the wheel: what track cogs are compatible? I ask this as there have been mentions of certain cogs not "working" with certain hubs in the SS/FG forum.
    The lockrings are "cut to exacting ISO standards" but nothing is said anywhere on their site as to what cogs are good. Or is this even a valid question?

    THANKS!
    ZippDiscRookie

    ps> I spun on a suntour with some effort (nothing damaging as it was done by hand), and it seems to be at home. But please, do tell your experience/knowledge on this.
    Deathlap - cyclocross, training, beer,...escape hatch

  2. #2
    Not-so-Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Norfolk, England
    My Bikes
    Orbea Enol roadie, Fly Micromachine BMX, Fort Track fixed
    Posts
    805
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    As far as I know, all cogs use the same thread (whatever it is), it's the lockrings you have to worry about. Campag (and a few others, including Phil Wood) use the Italian standard I think, but most others (Shimano, Surly, Paul, White etc) use the ISO thread. So if Zipp say they use the ISO thread, then you need an ISO lockring, and whatever cog takes your fancy.

    NB I may be wrong on this; Campag et al may use the ISO standard and Shimano et al the Japanese JIS standard, as is the case with square-tapered BBs. Can someone clarify?

  3. #3
    Senior Member mrwhite's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    away from home
    My Bikes
    11 track, one dualie and 3 ladies bikes.
    Posts
    660
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Miche has their own thread too - apparently you should only use miche on miche. If you use another type it can potentially damage threads if you want to return to using miche. Just what Im hearing.

    Good luck - thats some serious speed weaponry you're sittin on.

    In other words - Im no help
    *tc

  4. #4
    Back to being a Clyde.... ZappCatt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Santa Clara
    My Bikes
    Giant OCR1(specialized carbon seatpost,Terry Fly sadle, Syntace C2): Leader TT frame, Easton EC70fork, Aerolite bars, nashbar bullhorn, Titan Wheels: Fuji Track Pro(2003)
    Posts
    1,546
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    There are 3 standards for threads...As you can see they are very similar. I know(because I have done it) that you can go from Italian(Miche) to English(DuraAce) with no trouble. Once you decide which standard you want to follow, you should probably stay with it..since there will be some deformation of the threads if you jump back and forth.

    English 1.37" x 24tpi (current standard),
    French 34.7mm x 1mm,
    Italian 35mm x 24tpi

    For lockrings there are the 2 major standards
    ISO/English standard size 1.29" x 24 TPI fits most U.S., English, and Asian fixed gear hubs.

    Campy/Itailian are used on Phil Wood hubs, and most Italian-made(Miche) or French-made hubs.
    Last edited by ZappCatt; 04-27-06 at 10:33 AM.

  5. #5
    cxmagazine dot com pitboss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    WI
    My Bikes
    Titus road, Fort CX
    Posts
    8,270
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    awesome - thanks for all the input, even from our Australian friend!

    appreciated!
    Deathlap - cyclocross, training, beer,...escape hatch

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    636
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by ZappCatt
    There are 3 standards for threads...As you can see they are very similar. I know(because I have done it) that you can go from Italian(Miche) to English(DuraAce) with no trouble. Once you decide which standard you want to follow, you should probably stay with it..since there will be some deformation of the threads if you jump back and forth.

    English 1.37" x 24tpi (current standard),
    French 34.7mm x 1mm,
    Italian 35mm x 24tpi

    For lockrings there are the 2 major standards
    ISO/English standard size 1.29" x 24 TPI fits most U.S., English, and Asian fixed gear hubs.

    Campy/Itailian are used on Phil Wood hubs, and most Italian-made(Miche) or French-made hubs.

    There seems to be a bit of question in this thread about lockring vs. cog threadings. On the track, unless you go back before the 1960's, there are basically two COG threadings: ISO and BSC. The threads measure out virtually identical, but they are still slightly different and (and this is where it gets important) the ISO threads are not cut as deep as BSC. As a result, you can get an ISO threaded cog onto a BSC threaded hub, but you polish off the tops of the threads and also shave the sides just a bit. Ultimately you increase the risk of stripping your hub threads.

    Hub damage can also occur from some of the hard coating used on certain cogs, Suntour Superbe Pro's in particular. You need to use a wire brush or a scribe to clean out the threadings on those hubs. There's a bunch of powdery junk that comes out that otherwise grinds down your hub threads. EAI cogs don't have this problem, nor do Phil Woods.

    The other threading issue is at the lockring. There are three versions: BSC (used by Shimano, Suzue, Suntour, and most of the rest of the world), Campy (used by Campy and the Campy clones such as Gipiemme, Zeus, etc.), and Mavic (used, predictably, only by Mavic). They are not interchangeable. A BSC lockring will fit with difficulty on Mavic threads, but again it will damage the threads.

    In picking cogs one other dimension to worry about is the depth of the cog and the depth of the hub cog threading. Some combinations give sufficient room for a lockring to thread on properly, in others the cog sticks out and only allows a thread or two worth of grip for the lockring, and in a few the cog needs a spacer between it and the lockring or the lockring will bottom out before it hits the cog.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •