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  1. #1
    Senior Member sers's Avatar
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    gearing for different events

    relatively speaking, how does gearing change across events?

    do pursuit and match sprint require higher gearing than, say, keirin or points?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by sers
    relatively speaking, how does gearing change across events?

    do pursuit and match sprint require higher gearing than, say, keirin or points?
    It all depends on the track and the rider. Among good riders, someone doing match sprint isn't likely to be riding pursuit (at least, not seriously). Heck, just riding one type of event, you can be swapping gears three or four times in an evening of racing as a breeze changes, temperatures change, your legs get tired (or faster), etc. Basically, when track racing, you change gears about as often as you shift on the road. I'll be switching among a 46, 47, 48, 49 and occasionally a 50 chainring, and a 14, 15, or 16 rear cog. I'll warm up for 15 minutes, change gear, ride a fast pace line, change gear, do a few flying 200 meters, change gear (possibly between attempts as well), do a couple starts, change gear, do a couple longer events, change gear, and then warm down. If I insert myself into something that others on the track are doing, I might change gears a couple extra times. And that assumes I pick the right gears each time -- if not I might ride 4-5 minutes and then need to change again. Your 5 mm allen key is your best friend at the track.

  3. #3
    Upstanding member. Mike T.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11.4
    Your 5 mm allen key is your best friend at the track.
    How do you deal with those damn nuts with the silly slots? The whole thing seems to want to turn both in tightening and loosening. I have one of those silly wrenches for the nuts but they are frustrating in themselves.

    On some website a while ago I saw some sort of chainring bolt & nut '***' that looked like it held the nut at the back while a 5mm tool at the front worked on the bolt. Now I can't remember where I saw it.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T.
    How do you deal with those damn nuts with the silly slots? The whole thing seems to want to turn both in tightening and loosening. I have one of those silly wrenches for the nuts but they are frustrating in themselves.

    On some website a while ago I saw some sort of chainring bolt & nut '***' that looked like it held the nut at the back while a 5mm tool at the front worked on the bolt. Now I can't remember where I saw it.
    theres a specific tool to hold the back.

    If you can find them though you can buy bmx chainring bolts that are 5mm on one side and 4mm on the other or 6mm something like that.

  5. #5
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    A common name for that particular tool (or at least the one I hear thrown about) is the finger tool.

  6. #6
    Senior Member CafeRacer's Avatar
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    Mike, theyre called "bush nuts" I have a tool you can have. They come with all the high end cranks we install at work. OR you could buy some genuine Shimano Dura-Ace track chainring bolts. The inside part is nurled and the firsttime you tighten them in they press themselves in and never spin. Sooooooooo easy!

  7. #7
    Upstanding member. Mike T.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CafeRacer
    Mike, theyre called "bush nuts" I have a tool you can have. They come with all the high end cranks we install at work. OR you could buy some genuine Shimano Dura-Ace track chainring bolts. The inside part is nurled and the firsttime you tighten them in they press themselves in and never spin. Sooooooooo easy!

    I've got the Campagnolo chainring nut tool -


    - but it's about as much use as a chocolate cog. The "finger" type that Audiophile mentions would be better - the type with the center finger that locates in the nut hole like this -

    I'd thought of making one like this -

    But maybe this is better -


    What's the freeby tool you're giving away Jamie?

  8. #8
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    The Var tool that looks like a G-clamp is the best. I've never failed to undo a chainring bolt with it.

  9. #9
    Upstanding member. Mike T.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LWaB
    The Var tool that looks like a G-clamp is the best. I've never failed to undo a chainring bolt with it.
    That's the one I saw! Thanks LW. I knew I'd seen a G-clamp chainring bolt tool. Here it is at $75 from Sheldon Brown's site -



    He has the "bird-finger" tool too -



    This is much better than my Campagnolo version with no bird finger. The damn thing slips constantly.

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