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  1. #1
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    reccomendations on a good website for track wheels

    i have a bianchi pista i bought new this january and after riding it fixed from the time i bought it until about mid september, the threads for the lock ring were totally stipped out. this was my first fixed bike so i had no idea what that slipping was until it was to late. i just assumed it was normal until i started pedaling and going nowhere while among traffic on the street. i had a freewheel put on the other side of the flip flop and put a front brake on the bike but i begining to feel more and more unsafe and longing more and more for my track bike to be a track bike again. i really would like to get a nice phil wood or suzue promax hub but i cant find anywhere that has prebuilt wheels with higher quality hubs. the 100 or so wheels/wheelsets with formula hubs on ebay just wont cut it and a custom built wheel is a last resort for my budget. i dont want to spend more than 200. can anyone help me find somewhere?

    thanks,
    wes

  2. #2
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    You don't want to spend more then $200 but you want hubs that retail for well more than that built into a complete wheels????

    get the formula/cxp22s since it isn't a track bike. If it was the formula/reflexes would be a better choice. Formulas will cut it in every way except the bling.

    Also you're post probably belongs in ss/fg not track cycling

    also post

  3. #3
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    i am really only looking for a rear wheel for the time being and the hubs themselves are typically around 150. i dont need a fancy rim, just a decently built wheel. weight is not an issue. the reason i posted it in this forum is because i am going to begin riding my bike on the velodrome whenever it gets built here and i want something that will be compatible for both. the budget of 200 dollars is flexible to about 300 for just a rear wheel. i just really dont want to buy a wheel set because i really just need to get the bike back and running.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by wescollins13 View Post
    i am really only looking for a rear wheel for the time being and the hubs themselves are typically around 150. i dont need a fancy rim, just a decently built wheel. weight is not an issue. the reason i posted it in this forum is because i am going to begin riding my bike on the velodrome whenever it gets built here and i want something that will be compatible for both. the budget of 200 dollars is flexible to about 300 for just a rear wheel. i just really dont want to buy a wheel set because i really just need to get the bike back and running.
    A Phil Wood silver low flange single-sided track hub, the cheapest way to get into a Phil, still runs $150 plus at discounted retail. The spokes are another $18-22. There's no point in putting a junk rim on good hubs, and a inexpensive decent rim like a Mavic Open Pro Silver is still $65. Wheelbuilders vary a lot in what they charge, but figure $35 plus. If you want a wheel for track use as well, your only consideration at this point would really be to get a decent rim and decent lacing pattern that stand up to the conditions on the track. A basic 32 or 36 hole 3-cross wheel will do that fine. A double-sided fixed/fixed hub is recommended because you can simply flip the wheel to get an alternative cog (you tend to warm up in a lower gear and then switch to something higher for the meat of your workout).

    As to actual sources for such a wheel, most good shops can build one for you. You can order it from John Dacey at www.businesscycles.com. Eric at www.ergottwheels.com also builds extremely good wheels at a good price. Depending on where you are, Dean at www.bike-central.com can build a superb wheel, as can builders in track-oriented shops in San Francisco, New York, Chicago, etc.

    Do bear in mind that you don't necessarily want the same rim, tire, cog size, etc. on your road wheel and your track wheel. Just to get out and try the track is one thing, but you'll likely end up swapping so much stuff around (especially depending on the track) that you'll just want a different wheel, so buying a road wheel inexpensively with Formula hubs and any inexpensive rim may be the better route. On a steep short track such as ADT in Los Angeles, you really don't want to be riding some kinds of tires because you can slip and bring down other riders. You can take out a pair of Formula-based wheels for your first two or three rides and see what the locals are riding. Some tracks are very much into Phil's, others are into prebuilts, others into Dura Ace hubs. You'll see everything out there and should talk to locals on the track you want to ride before you get too much invested.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 11.4 View Post
    A double-sided fixed/fixed hub is recommended because you can simply flip the wheel to get an alternative cog (you tend to warm up in a lower gear and then switch to something higher for the meat of your workout).

    At the ops level a flip-flop formula is going to be better than a single sided phil. And even the single phil is going to be hard to do within his budget. If he absolutely doesn't want to buy a new front(though as you mention it could be useful depending on his track) he can always get just a rear built with a formula for substantially less then the phil that will be just as good for his purposes.

    Any wheel that you can use on the road you can use on the track. In fact the restrictions on the track are less than the road because you don't need a lockring. Ideally a track wheel would be tubular but that limits it's day to day usability.

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