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-   -   cannondale capo (http://www.bikeforums.net/track-cycling-velodrome-racing-training-area/372586-cannondale-capo.html)

tjayk 12-21-07 02:40 PM

cannondale capo
 
the new red capo looks really awesome and i want one, as i fell in love with a red cannondale road bike i was able to ride for a while when i was younger. the only thing i don't like about it is the name - and the cheap components it comes with.

my question - is this frame suitable for the velodrome? i don't plan to only ride it on the track, but i am only a couple hours from the track in kenosha, wisconsin - so i definitely plan to ride there when i can. i know it is based on a track frame, but it seems they've made the geo more street friendly.

if i don't get a capo, i will probably pick up one of the kilo pro frames to ride in the street and velodrome with some adjustments.

any comments appreciated - sorry if these entry level frames are too far below your radar.

il capo 12-22-07 04:41 PM

ride it and if you are happy with it buy it...I love mine, and not just for the name. I ride it everyday as my commuter 35 + miles a day with minor mods. I also have taken on the track and plan racing with it in 08.

andre nickatina 12-22-07 05:17 PM

A local mechanic told me the fork is more suited for the road and can get unstable at high speeds on the track. Probably best to ask Cannondale or someone using the frame for track...

Duke of Kent 12-22-07 06:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by andre nickatina (Post 5855949)
A local mechanic told me the fork is more suited for the road and can get unstable at high speeds on the track. Probably best to ask Cannondale or someone using the frame for track...

How would a fork that would see higher speeds on the road be less stable on the track? That doesn't make any sense.

They have the same HT angle as well as fork rake...

il capo 12-23-07 12:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Duke of Kent (Post 5856354)
How would a fork that would see higher speeds on the road be less stable on the track? That doesn't make any sense.

They have the same HT angle as well as fork rake...

Thank you ....I was thinking the same thing.....I cant tell the difference between sprinting on the track or road going 35 +

andre nickatina 12-23-07 02:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Duke of Kent (Post 5856354)
How would a fork that would see higher speeds on the road be less stable on the track? That doesn't make any sense.

They have the same HT angle as well as fork rake...

I really have no ****ing clue... I respect the mechanic that told me this and that's why I posted it.

dutret 12-23-07 08:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by andre nickatina (Post 5857924)
I really have no ****ing clue... I respect the mechanic that told me this and that's why I posted it.

It's the exact same geometry(and frame/fork I think) as the old caad7 track bike. I think you misunderstood or your respect is misplaced. Perhaps he said that cannondales track offerings have always been too stable for the track or perhaps he is just another clueless bike shop employee who should keep his mouth shut?

Dubbayoo 12-23-07 11:42 AM

Most production track bikes from major mfr's are a compromise between a true track bike and a street fixed gear. C-dale's first track bikes in the early 90's had ridiculously steep head tubes (74-75 degrees) because that was in vogue for track sprinting during the Marty Nothstein era. They were too twitchy with too much toeclip overlap for street use.

Now mfr's have gotten wise. Their track bikes now have road geometry up front with 72-73 degree head tubes. They figured they sell a lot more bikes to the street crowd that way, especially with front brake holes.

Even pure track bikes now have at most 73-74 degree head tubes now. Mfr's are trying to get both a pursuit and a sprint bike out of one carbon mold since the molds are so expensive. Trail takes a higher priority than it used to for the track. I would think a fork designed for the road would be TOO stable for the track, i.e. too hard to maneuver quickly.

andre nickatina 12-23-07 02:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dutret (Post 5858370)
or your respect is misplaced. Perhaps he said that cannondales track offerings have always been too stable for the track or perhaps he is just another clueless bike shop employee who should keep his mouth shut?

Couldn't be anymore off target. One of the most respected mechanics/shop owners with a shop that caters moreso to the Alpenrose velodrome/track racing scene than any other LBS in Portland.

Although it's likely I misunderstood.

dutret 12-23-07 03:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by andre nickatina (Post 5859692)
Couldn't be anymore off target. One of the most respected mechanics/shop owners with a shop that caters moreso to the Alpenrose velodrome/track racing scene than any other LBS in Portland.

Although it's likely I misunderstood.

which shop?

andre nickatina 12-23-07 03:28 PM

Bike Central

dutret 12-23-07 03:43 PM

hmmmm alpenrose is a really hard track to ride but I would think you would want more rake to keep from drifting up in the corners. Maybe I'm wrong. Either way the fork is the same as the caad7s and whether or not it's good for alpenrose it's probably good for kenosha/northbrook.

noahgansett 01-03-08 04:52 PM

the Capo is actually a CAAD5 frame, same as the Major Taylor Track that they made until a few years ago. The components (especially the wheels) leave a lot to be desired, but the frameset is great comfy enough for commuting and stiff enough to climb like a goat.

capolover 05-10-08 09:41 AM

capo's are caad5 frames.

bradenCBC 05-11-08 07:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dubbayoo (Post 5858993)
Most production track bikes from major mfr's are a compromise between a true track bike and a street fixed gear. C-dale's first track bikes in the early 90's had ridiculously steep head tubes (74-75 degrees) because that was in vogue for track sprinting during the Marty Nothstein era. They were too twitchy with too much toeclip overlap for street use.

Now mfr's have gotten wise. Their track bikes now have road geometry up front with 72-73 degree head tubes. They figured they sell a lot more bikes to the street crowd that way, especially with front brake holes.

Even pure track bikes now have at most 73-74 degree head tubes now. Mfr's are trying to get both a pursuit and a sprint bike out of one carbon mold since the molds are so expensive. Trail takes a higher priority than it used to for the track. I would think a fork designed for the road would be TOO stable for the track, i.e. too hard to maneuver quickly.


Seems to me that with the cannondale having a trail of 5.7 (in most sizes) and 73 head angle with 45mm fork keeping the front end down in the banking would be the biggest concern. For a while I was getting a little overly into trail and I asked Dave Tiemeyer about various trails as well as over all head angle and his position is that a trail over 6 combined created with a short rake and steep angle is better than a trail over 6 created by a long rake and relaxed angle.

The Cannondale seems to do neither of these things. I have never ridden on the track though so I just don't know

Braden

gomez 05-11-08 09:46 AM

The lack of sweet spec is reflected in the price, I got mine for $875 CDN. You can upgrade the wheels and bars and still come out under $1500, which seems to be the benchmark to most entry level track bikes. So far I'm happy with mine.


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