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  1. #1
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    i wanna talk about the points race

    what does everybody do for a point a lap or any other variation of a points race? this question may be vague but i'm hoping that many different racers will give specific examples of race situations (like a 10 lap point-a-lap might have a different strategy as opposed to maybe a longer race with points every 5 laps or so). this board has been boring lately and since most velodromes are racing now i wanted to get a new discussion going.

    my first race ever on the velodrome (san diego) was a 7 lap point a lap race in the c category.. there were a few early moves right off of the ***. i followed one guy thinking he was going to make the break and hopefully we could both get off the front, but instead he didn't commit to this break, which allowed another rider to come down the track with lots of momentum and get off the front for 3 or 4 laps. the rest of the race i felt worked with a group of 3 or 4 riders on a chase, but we were unable to bridge.

    next time i want to stay on the higher part of the track and pay attention to the riders and wait for a solid break and hoepfully latch on to that, or catch the pack off guard. anybody have any input? and past stories?
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  2. #2
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    Typically the points races at Kissena are 9 laps with three sprints. Kissena is a 400m velodrome, so the total distance is 3.6km.

    My strategy is typically to break away immediately after the first sprint and try to stay away for the next two. Either that or break away at some point during the race. I'm a terrible sprinter so this strategy has worked for me on a few occasions.

    I think it worked most because I'm a terrible sprinter and so I generally don't do to well in most track races. Therefore most of the other races don't see me as much of a threat and when I break away, they let me get away. However I'm pretty good at endurance events so if I get away I can usually stay away for a few laps.

    This has pretty much stopped working for me as people have caught on to my tactics.

  3. #3
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    Well, point-a-lap tactics tend to be quite different from points race tactics. The longer the points race (Nine laps? Good grief.) the more true that becomes.

    As you've seen, point-a-lap races are often won by whomever gets three or four points. Often you will find a sprinter who takes off from the ***. This works occasionally, if the field spends too long looking at each other. Mostly, though, the field will take off pretty quickly and bring the sprinter back after a couple of laps. It's usually a good idea, then, to take a spot about 5-6 riders back early on and let the pack do the work for the first half of the race. Once the tempo is set and the breathing has gotten a bit ragged, it's either time to contest a few sprints or start a break, depending upon your skills and fitness. In trying to win sprints, it is a very good idea to really go for it, as a common mistake is to half-ass it in concern for the fact that the next sprint is only 20 seconds away. The mistake is that it takes nearly as much effort to finish second or third in a sprint as it does to win it -- and second doesn't count for **** in a point-a-lap. Make your move and stick with it unless it's clear that you're beaten. As a bonus, a 100% sprint in the middle of a point-a-lap often ends up bringing you and one or two competitors off the front. Getting organized and maintaining that gap can make all the difference -- especially if the race is part of an omnium. Guaranteeing a top three finish for yourself is very intelligent, when riding a lottery like a point-a-lap. It's one of those races that isn't likely to win the omnium for you, but can very easily lose it.
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  4. #4
    what. kyle!'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smitty22 View Post

    my first race ever on the velodrome (san diego)


    next time i want to stay on the higher part of the track and pay attention to the riders and wait for a solid break and hoepfully latch on to that, or catch the pack off guard. anybody have any input? and past stories?
    was this last week or some other time? i'm doing my first night of racing tomorrow night.


    if there's a points race i'll do a break with you. i'll be on the rush hour with a red jersey.

  5. #5
    Lurker for Life yonderboy's Avatar
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    In a point-a-lap, I think there's two opportune times to attack. The beginning, obviously, and the end. Jump hard and see how long you can stay away. Point-a-lap tends to need more attention paid to who is currently leading and being able to counter attack them. If you and another rider are off the front, try to cooperate. Otherwise, he'll ride your wheel until the final few laps and take you in the end.

    Points races can be done according to your strength. I've seen sprinters sit in until the last 200 and blow everyone's doors off, and I've seen Cat2 road riders take a flyer and end up lapping the field. You can take a gamble and try to keep off the front as long as possible to rack up the points, but the downside to that is if you pop and go off the back, you'll lose most, if not all, of your points. Keep an eye on your positioning coming into the sprint lap, so you're not boxed down low, and hammer it after the sprint.

  6. #6
    what. kyle!'s Avatar
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    ok wow. just finished my first night of racing. i clearly need to work on my endurance.

    what would anyone suggest for the in between time? when you're not racing. should i sit and catch my breath or do some snail pace warm ups on the warm up circle?

    i could be in better shape, but that'll come in time.


    anyways racing is mucho fun.

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