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  1. #1
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    stem up or down. What's more "pro?"

    I can run two stem and bar configurations yielding the same position. Stem is a 100 +-10' with deda pistas

    1. stem flipped so it is more horizontal with just under 3cm of spacer stack

    or

    2. stem flipped up to more vertical rise with stem slammed all the way to the headset.

    My question is what is going to give me the best performance and be more "pro?"

  2. #2
    Veteran Racer TejanoTrackie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lighmant View Post
    I can run two stem and bar configurations yielding the same position. Stem is a 100 +-10' with deda pistas

    1. stem flipped so it is more horizontal with just under 3cm of spacer stack

    or

    2. stem flipped up to more vertical rise with stem slammed all the way to the headset.

    My question is what is going to give me the best performance and be more "pro?"
    The only pertinent issue is that with the stem turned up it will be clamped on the steerer tube closer to the support of the upper headset bearings and will be a little bit stronger and stiffer (less flexing of the steerer tube). This has nothing to do with "looking pro", and is simply a function of the sizing and design of your frame as well as the size/angle of your stem. My stem just happens to be turned up for that reason only.

  3. #3
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    If you're worried about resale, less cutting of steerer is better.

    Otherwise I'd slam the stem and cut away.

    cdr

  4. #4
    abandoning fly:yes/land:no's Avatar
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    one other consideration when cutting the steerer: if you are using the bike for pursuits or any event that might use aerobars, make sure the steerer tube is long enough to allow the correct position.

  5. #5
    Veteran Racer TejanoTrackie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
    If you're worried about resale, less cutting of steerer is better.

    Otherwise I'd slam the stem and cut away.

    cdr
    Actually, he doesn't have to cut off all of the steerer. He can stack some spacers on top of the stem, in case he changes the stem in some way. I've left 2cm of steerer above the stem using 4 5mm spacers.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TejanoTrackie View Post
    Actually, he doesn't have to cut off all of the steerer. He can stack some spacers on top of the stem, in case he changes the stem in some way. I've left 2cm of steerer above the stem using 4 5mm spacers.
    I figured the spacers on top are not as "pro" as trimming the steerer tube. The "pro" bit is one of the parts of the original question. But, yes, that's true. On my tandem I've left the spacers on top since it's unlikely that I'll be buying a new tandem fork if we ever sell our tandem. However on my own bikes I've cut and slashed.

    cdr

  7. #7
    Veteran Racer TejanoTrackie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carpediemracing View Post
    I figured the spacers on top are not as "pro" as trimming the steerer tube. The "pro" bit is one of the parts of the original question. But, yes, that's true. On my tandem I've left the spacers on top since it's unlikely that I'll be buying a new tandem fork if we ever sell our tandem. However on my own bikes I've cut and slashed.

    cdr
    So does my road fixie look "pro", since it has no spacers on top (one small one required for the headset cap)?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
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    I'm asking because on my road bike I have 1cm of stack and a flipped down stem. This is the accepted norm of the road side and you rarely see any of the big guns with stems flipped up. On the track however I see many many people with stems flipped up. I'm just asking if there was a difference in thinking between the two disciplines. If I can get the same position either way, why not?

  9. #9
    Veteran Racer TejanoTrackie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lighmant View Post
    I'm asking because on my road bike I have 1cm of stack and a flipped down stem. This is the accepted norm of the road side and you rarely see any of the big guns with stems flipped up. On the track however I see many many people with stems flipped up. I'm just asking if there was a difference in thinking between the two disciplines. If I can get the same position either way, why not?
    Yes, I too run the stem on my road bike turned down and on my track bike turned up. There are three reasons for this 1) My track frame is a smaller size than my road frame 2) My track frame has a higher (less drop) bottom bracket than my road bike 3) My track bars have more drop than my road bars. All of this affects the relative vertical position of my butt on the saddle and my hands on the bars. Therefore, my choice of stem configuration (up or down) is simply a factor of the desired position of my body on the bike. Since I don't want a lot of spacers under the stem for the reasons I stated previously, I chose to turn the stem up. Even with the stem turned up on my track bike, my position is more bent over than on my road bike.

  10. #10
    abandoning fly:yes/land:no's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TejanoTrackie View Post
    So does my road fixie look "pro", since it has no spacers on top (one small one required for the headset cap)?
    no, but for a lot more reasons than the stem/spacer positioning.

  11. #11
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    Tejano the saddle should be higher than the handlebars.

  12. #12
    Veteran Racer TejanoTrackie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vitus_979 View Post
    Tejano the saddle should be higher than the handlebars.
    Why? It's a street fixie not a track racer. Besides, I just hate looking "pro".

  13. #13
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    Best performance is stem as close as possible to the head set.
    "Most pro" is best performance.
    Pros wont give up any performance to "LOOK" more pro, that would be FRED

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