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Track Cycling: Velodrome Racing and Training Area Looking to enter into the realm of track racing? Want to share your experiences and tactics for riding on a velodrome? The Track Cycling forums is for you! Come in and discuss training/racing, equipment, and current track cycling events.

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Old 02-17-10, 09:33 PM   #1
bryyando
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Cannondale Capo or Iro Angus

Yes I come from the fixed gear forum. Anyways

I currently ride the Angus and I don't really have any problems with it, however I'm looking at somewhat racing track as well. The bike that I would end up keeping would have to be able to be moderately decent at the track, and can handle group rides.

Opinions?

Builds:
Angus: Sugino 75, Thomson Seatpost, Nitto Jag. 80mm, Nitto b123, Roll saddle, Sylvans with Toshis. Velocity Deep V

Capo: (Planned build) Cannondale SI Carbon Fork, Giant Carbon Aero Seatpost, Truvativ Omniums, and whatever ends up on it.
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Old 02-18-10, 05:11 PM   #2
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the angus would be fine on the track, especially if you're just starting out. unless you're just trying to justify buying a new bike. i'd take whatever money you'd be spending on a new bike and get a stem w/out a negative rise (tangent: now i don't know how tall you are or how your bike fits you, but i really can't see how people can race with a jag stem. i tried a jag/deep drop set up for 2 races when i first started and it wasn't fun especially with the deep drop 123s), a decent set of clipless pedals, and shoes. go ahead and race with deep Vs, no need to worry about a nice track wheelset yet either.

Last edited by omgmarclol; 02-18-10 at 05:19 PM.
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Old 02-18-10, 08:36 PM   #3
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People aren't as harsh over here. We are open to new racers, too. Glad to see you giving the sport a try!
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Old 02-19-10, 01:30 AM   #4
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I think the negative rise stems are a function of how track bikes used to be sized, and still ARE sized for pro keirin in Japan. That is, a "handfull of seatpost", which means a relatively high top tube compared to the way bikes have been built and sized since, oh, the mid '90's or thereabouts. Also, a lot of Japanese have comparatively long torsos to leg length, so that puts them lower relative to the top tube, too. Anyhow, it may make sense depending upon how your bike fits. I've got a Jag with the shallower drop for my Panasonic, but I'm on the limit, so honestly a straight stem would do just as well. But it looks cool!
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Old 02-19-10, 01:57 AM   #5
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I think the negative rise stems are a function of how track bikes used to be sized, and still ARE sized for pro keirin in Japan. That is, a "handfull of seatpost", which means a relatively high top tube compared to the way bikes have been built and sized since, oh, the mid '90's or thereabouts. Also, a lot of Japanese have comparatively long torsos to leg length, so that puts them lower relative to the top tube, too. Anyhow, it may make sense depending upon how your bike fits. I've got a Jag with the shallower drop for my Panasonic, but I'm on the limit, so honestly a straight stem would do just as well. But it looks cool!
I agree.
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Old 02-19-10, 08:48 AM   #6
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no i understand why and how a negative rise stem would fit certain frames, like i said, i don't know how the bike fits him/her. the way bikes are sized these days and how most bikes are fit, a negative rise stem with deep drops almost puts your body position too low for comfort, in my experience. i think i'm also jaded by severe saddle to bar drops where a negative rise stem, with deep drops ultimately puts your hand positioning on the drops below wheel height and ultimately useless except for show. now either, the rider of these bike have comparatively neanderthal arm length is debatable, but not likely...but more that the bike isn't sized correctly.
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