Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Disgruntled Grad Student seejohnbike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    CAAD 10, Cross Pro, Cross Comp, TK2
    Posts
    446
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    proper saddle setback

    So, I was just wondering. Aside from doing what feels appropriate, I don't think i've ever heard (and tried a quick search for the topic and didn't yield the best results) what an ideal saddle setback is for a track bike.

    on a roadbike, the traditional KOPS method seems to work (at the least, it gives a good starting reference), however, given the more aggressive angles on a track bike, that method goes out the window.

    Is there a mnemonic to get track setback right, or is it pretty much by feel?
    If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn't be called research.

  2. #2
    Senior Member bitingduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,929
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Depends on how you ride and the particular bike, but for the most part probably start pretty close to your road position and tweak from there. there are plenty of threads pointing out that many (most?) endurance racers use a pretty roadlike setup. People act like track riders don't spend a lot of time on the bike, but there are plenty of people who spend many hours at a time on the track.
    Track - the other off-road
    http://www.lavelodrome.org

  3. #3
    Disgruntled Grad Student seejohnbike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    CAAD 10, Cross Pro, Cross Comp, TK2
    Posts
    446
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i mean, I get that your road position is close to your track position, but in terms of geometry alone, each degree increase in seat tube angle equates to approximately 1cm less saddle setback. Track geo is more aggressive, in that the steeper angles rotate your entire body forward. If you were to put your saddle back in the typical road position, you will effectively increase your reach, but also have to double yourself over a bit more to fit the track drops. If you were to shorten your stem, and perhaps raise the bars, then you're effectively riding road bike geo, on the track...

    also, I forget where I read it, but IIRC, the typical road saddle setback isn't as conducive to spinning the higher cadences associated with track racing. Hence the steeper angles/less setback.

    So, for example, if your track bike has a 1 degree steeper seat tube than your road bike, will your measurements be similar, with approximately 1 cm less saddle setback (and knee approximately 1 cm infront of pedal spindle), or what?
    If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn't be called research.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    My Bikes
    Marin Stelvio, Pogliaghi road, Panasonic track, Dolan DF3
    Posts
    593
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You'll have to experiment and see what works for you. A lot of people say that forward is better, and indeed it is EASIER to spin faster this way, but you might lose some power. My saddles are slammed back all the way on my track bikes. Your milage may vary, but check out the positions of the top pros and I think you won't see too many with way forward positions. Of course here I'm talking about a sprinter-type position, so this will also depend on what kind of racing you want to do.

  5. #5
    Senior Member bitingduck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,929
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by seejohnbike View Post
    Track geo is more aggressive, in that the steeper angles rotate your entire body forward. If you were to put your saddle back in the typical road position, you will effectively increase your reach,
    but also have to double yourself over a bit more to fit the track drops. If you were to shorten your stem, and perhaps raise the bars, then you're effectively riding road bike geo, on the track...
    You're overthinking it. You can just about ignore the tubes and angles and just put your points of contact with the bike the same relative to each other as on the road and everything else will take care of itself. then tweak as needed.

    And why adjust your saddle to get to the handlebars? adjust the bars and stem to put them where your hands want to be.

    also, I forget where I read it, but IIRC, the typical road saddle setback isn't as conducive to spinning the higher cadences associated with track racing. Hence the steeper angles/less setback.
    never really noticed. back when I spent a lot of time on the rollers when I lived in a place with winter I could do high rpm on the road bike with no trouble.

    So, for example, if your track bike has a 1 degree steeper seat tube than your road bike, will your measurements be similar, with approximately 1 cm less saddle setback (and knee approximately 1 cm infront of pedal spindle), or what?
    I suspect most people ride pretty close to KOPS. I don't inspect people very often, but that seems to be the general starting point.
    Track - the other off-road
    http://www.lavelodrome.org

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •