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Thread: "Dear Carleton"

  1. #1026
    Elitist carleton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaytron View Post
    Dear Carleton,

    How does one determine if he/she is ready to start racing? How does one START racing? (Velo)
    Man, racing track at the local level is like playing basketball, volleyball, soccer, swimming, etc...a the local level. Just show up with the willingness to try and have fun.

    All of the racing is based on skill, so beginners race beginners, slower guys race slower guys, etc... That way, it's always fun and you are always competitive.

    Don't be shy. It's A LOT of fun. I know a guy who started racing in his mid 40s...and in his second season he's kicking butt. In an email conversation just yesterday he wrote, "I wish I had found this sport 30 years ago." He loves it.

    The cool thing about track racing, just like track and field, there is something for everyone. If you have lots of endurance, there are endurance races. If you are low on endurance but have sprint speed, there are sprint races. If you are all-around, there are middle distance races, etc...

    It's really fun and great exercise for people of all ages. I've been in races where the youngest rider was in his early 20s and the oldest was over 60. Look at TT. Just because he's ugly doesn't mean he's slow (just kidding TT)


    EDIT:
    I forgot to address how to start.

    Which track will be your local track? Some have very good websites, facebook, twitter, etc... some do not. If it's very organized, inquire about the next Track Certification Class also called Beginner Classes. This class is a very rudimentary (read: beginner) course on track rules and etiquette so that you'll know what to expect and what is expected of you. EVERYBODY must (or at least should) take these classes. I know guys who are semi-pro road racers that had to take the Certification classes. It's not to make you faster, it's simply to explain how things work. Think of it as Track Orientation Sessions.
    Last edited by carleton; 09-12-11 at 09:43 AM.

  2. #1027
    Brown Bear, Sqrl Hunter Jaytron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carleton View Post
    Man, racing track at the local level is like playing basketball, volleyball, soccer, swimming, etc...a the local level. Just show up with the willingness to try and have fun.

    All of the racing is based on skill, so beginners race beginners, slower guys race slower guys, etc... That way, it's always fun and you are always competitive.

    Don't be shy. It's A LOT of fun. I know a guy who started racing in his mid 40s...and in his second season he's kicking butt. In an email conversation just yesterday he wrote, "I wish I had found this sport 30 years ago." He loves it.

    The cool thing about track racing, just like track and field, there is something for everyone. If you have lots of endurance, there are endurance races. If you are low on endurance but have sprint speed, there are sprint races. If you are all-around, there are middle distance races, etc...

    It's really fun and great exercise for people of all ages. I've been in races where the youngest rider was in his early 20s and the oldest was over 60. Look at TT. Just because he's ugly doesn't mean he's slow (just kidding TT)


    EDIT:
    I forgot to address how to start.

    Which track will be your local track? Some have very good websites, facebook, twitter, etc... some do not. If it's very organized, inquire about the next Track Certification Class also called Beginner Classes. This class is a very rudimentary (read: beginner) course on track rules and etiquette so that you'll know what to expect and what is expected of you. EVERYBODY must (or at least should) take these classes. I know guys who are semi-pro road racers that had to take the Certification classes. It's not to make you faster, it's simply to explain how things work. Think of it as Track Orientation Sessions.
    Thanks for the awesome info as usual Carleton. It's nice knowing that I'll at least be grouped with beginners. I went to the track to check it out last week and got real scared by the sheer speed and power of the people that were there that day.

    Here's my local track: http://www.ridethetrack.com/

    Racing really looks like a ton of fun. I have a few friends that are probably going to start road racing soon, but I don't think I have the endurance for that.
    Last edited by Jaytron; 09-12-11 at 10:03 AM.

  3. #1028
    Elitist carleton's Avatar
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    Remember, track racing is not a year-round sport. The season is ending soon. You should ask to see if there are any certification classes soon. If not, pick up one early next season.

  4. #1029
    pro in someone's theory prooftheory's Avatar
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    Is this true for indoor tracks as well? Forest City seems to have races through the winter.

  5. #1030
    No Money and No Sense sillygolem's Avatar
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    Dear

    Could you go into a little more detail about body fat and racing? Do you do a bulking/cutting cycle in the off-season?
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrodzilla View Post
    I ride fixed because I'm mad at my parents. **** you Mom!

  6. #1031
    THE STUFFED Leukybear's Avatar
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    I heard he goes into hibernation as well.

    /on topic EDIT

    Dear Carleton,

    What's your opinion on buying a previously custom built bicycle with custom geometry?
    Last edited by Leukybear; 09-12-11 at 01:44 PM.

  7. #1032
    Junior Member HankScorpio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carleton View Post
    You probably burn 2-3x the calories that a normal person does in a day...which means you need to eat more, plain and simple. Being skinny means that your body is burning fat for fuel because it does not have enough fuel available in your belly.

    Eat throughout the day, not just breakfast lunch and dinner.

    YOUR BODY IS A MACHINE.

    Choose foods high in complex carbohydrates for energy that you burn through the day. Protein (even whey protein powder) to repair muscles as you recover. If you can tolerate milk, drink it. Lots of good stuff in it.

    Starting Strength is a great book for beginning athletes who want to get stronger. I followed this plan when I started lifting seriously and still follow a lot of it now. I went from squatting less than 135lbs to 350lbs 3 sets of 5 reps all in about 3 months.

    http://www.amazon.com/Starting-Stren.../dp/0976805421

    But, if you are going to lift and courier then you will need to eat even more. But, you probably won't have enough rest and recovery time to be effective in lifting or riding and one or both will suffer.
    Awesome Carleton, thank you very much for the response and the link to that book. My friend has mentioned whey to me before and I think I'll look into getting some.

  8. #1033
    Elitist carleton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by prooftheory View Post
    Is this true for indoor tracks as well? Forest City seems to have races through the winter.
    I think many indoor tracks have winter racing leagues and are certainly open for training.

    Quote Originally Posted by sillygolem View Post
    Dear

    Could you go into a little more detail about body fat and racing? Do you do a bulking/cutting cycle in the off-season?
    Body fat and racing for cyclists in general or me specifically? I don't bulk and cut like bodybuilders. When bodybuilders look their best, they are actually their weakest. The key is to do whatever hardcore weightloss at the beginning of the off-season when the training load isn't as demanding, because when the training load is demanding (when the racing season is approaching), I'll have to eat a lot and dieting is really hard. Then there is racing for 6 months, where I'll have to eat a lot, too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Leukybear View Post
    I heard he goes into hibernation as well.

    /on topic EDIT

    Dear Carleton,

    What's your opinion on buying a previously custom built bicycle with custom geometry?
    That just means that it's custom for someone else. For all intents and purposes, if it's not custom for you, it's no different than any off-the-shelf bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by HankScorpio View Post
    Awesome Carleton, thank you very much for the response and the link to that book. My friend has mentioned whey to me before and I think I'll look into getting some.
    Good luck. Generally speaking you want to focus on eating fast-burning carbs during the day and slow-burning protein at night. Eating 2 chicken breasts for breakfast won't give you the same energy as 2 muffins.

    Also, Gatorade is cheap, ubiquitous, and it works. The standard stuff, not G2 or the other variants. Gatorade has Sucrose, Glucose, & Fructose which your body burns instantly as fuel. Just like fruit.

    But, for those not buring as many calories as HankScorpio, ingesting so much sugar from Gatorade will simply make you fat. I know of people who drink Gatorade instead of soft drinks because they think it's better for them. It's only better if you burn the sugar that you are ingesting. If you are sedentary it will simply turn to fat. Sugar is still sugar.
    Last edited by carleton; 09-12-11 at 08:59 PM.

  9. #1034
    yoked homebrewk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carleton View Post
    Also, Gatorade is cheap, ubiquitous, and it works. The standard stuff, not G2 or the other variants. Gatorade has Sucrose, Glucose, & Fructose which your body burns instantly as fuel. Just like fruit.
    Interesting. I've always stuck to G2 because Gatorade gives me a stomach ache. Does that happen to you too? (I've also heard people sometimes water down their Gatorade to cope with that)

  10. #1035
    i'll probably break it 91MF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by homebrewk View Post
    Interesting. I've always stuck to G2 because Gatorade gives me a stomach ache. Does that happen to you too? (I've also heard people sometimes water down their Gatorade to cope with that)

    i 50/50 my gatorade.
    bike. throw. #MFDCR

  11. #1036
    Elitist carleton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by homebrewk View Post
    Interesting. I've always stuck to G2 because Gatorade gives me a stomach ache. Does that happen to you too? (I've also heard people sometimes water down their Gatorade to cope with that)
    It's funny you say that. I switched to G2 in 2010 for training and racing for that very reason. I also would get cotton mouth. Basically, it's sugar overload. G2 is low in sugar. But, I did some research and found out that Sucrose, Glucose, & Fructose are very helpful especially in sprint training and racing for glycogen synthesis. So, I started to tough it out and deal with regular Gatorade. Watering it down helps a lot...which makes it even cheaper

  12. #1037
    Quirky Grifter LesterOfPuppets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 91MF View Post
    i 50/50 my gatorade.
    +1. I also cut all my fruit juices except grape and apple with water. At least in half.
    1980ish Free Spirit Sunbird fixed * 1996 Mongoose IBOC Zero-G * 1997 KHS Comp * 1990-ish Scapin * Lemond Buenos Aires Triple

  13. #1038
    Elitist carleton's Avatar
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    America is addicted to sugar.

    Most consumers keep demanding (with their money) sweeter and sweeter beverages.

    I grew up in the South where it's normal to serve sweet tea in homes and restaurants. I know sweet tea. Before the last 5 years or so, you couldn't get sweet tea west of Louisiana. Then McDonalds got ahold of it. McDonalds sweet tea is intolerably sweet. Chick fil A did it before McDonalds. But, I don't think it was as sweet.

    Sweeter, sweeter, sweeter.

    The same goes for sodas.
    Last edited by carleton; 09-12-11 at 11:16 PM.

  14. #1039
    THE STUFFED Leukybear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carleton View Post
    Then McDonalds got ahold of it. McDonalds sweet tea is intolerably sweet. Chick fil A did it before McDonalds. But, I don't think it was as sweet.
    You can water that down too if you go to a mcdonalds and beverages are self serve; water is usually dispensed via the soda fountain for lemonade or powerade nozzel.

    Don't forget salt giving us high blood pressure and strokes when we rage!

  15. #1040
    Fresh Garbage hairnet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carleton View Post
    America is addicted to sugar.
    The year I decided to stop drinking soda/sweet drinks I lost 20 lbs. It was marvelous


    Quote Originally Posted by Leukybear View Post
    Don't forget salt giving us high blood pressure and strokes when we rage!
    Don't forget how it ruins people's palettes. I don't add salt to anything and try not to eat things with a lot of salt (habit due to father's high blood pressure) now I just can't eat out at a lot of places because of how much salt people add to their food. Some people can't stand my and my family's cooking because they claim it has no taste - because there is no added salt.
    Last edited by hairnet; 09-13-11 at 12:40 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrodzilla View Post
    I'd rather ride a greasy bowling ball than one of those things.
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  16. #1041
    yoked homebrewk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by carleton View Post
    It's funny you say that. I switched to G2 in 2010 for training and racing for that very reason. I also would get cotton mouth. Basically, it's sugar overload. G2 is low in sugar. But, I did some research and found out that Sucrose, Glucose, & Fructose are very helpful especially in sprint training and racing for glycogen synthesis. So, I started to tough it out and deal with regular Gatorade. Watering it down helps a lot...which makes it even cheaper
    I may try that. Usually when we ride in the spring (20+ miles per day) I just bring 2 bottles with cold water but I'll look into 50/50 Gatorade.

  17. #1042
    No Money and No Sense sillygolem's Avatar
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    Your body uses oxygenated hydrocarbon chains in one form or another, which at some point is converted into ATP for use by cells. How fast it gets converted into ATP depends on its structure.

    Glucose (aka dextrose) is carried in your bloodstream for quick access as fuel. Uptake is used to test for diabetes: The orange soda used in these tests is Lucozade, which is popular as an energy drink in the UK.

    Alcohols and fructose undergo a process that produces uric acid, which can cause arterial damage and leads to gout. If you eat fruit, you get relatively low amounts of fructose, and the fiber keeps all of it from being absorbed. On the other hand, soda is loaded with it and it all gets absorbed, which makes eating high fructose syrup a problem. However, making it usable for cells is relatively fast.

    Plain sugar is sucrose, a molecule made up of a glucose and a fructose. These are broken apart before being converted, so it takes a little longer than HFCS to use.

    Lactose is galactose (another simple sugar) hooked to a glucose. Starches are complex combinations of simple sugars, proteins are hydrocarbon chains with a little nitrogen and sometimes sulfur thrown in, and fats are a glycerin molecule with 1-3 attached hydrocarbon chains. All these take longer to break down, so they provide long-term energy.

    Glycogen is the animal equivalent of starch. It's stored in the liver and muscles, and designed for quick breakdown to fuel your body. When you run out, you bonk.

    Complex carbohydrates and lean protein are recommended for diets because their slow release keeps your blood sugar from bouncing around. However, when you're exercising, you want to get glucose ready ASAP to keep from using up your glycogen and bonking.

    Sports drinks and energy gels use some sort of sugar combination to keep your body fueled in the short term: Normally this will be dextrose (now,) fructose and sucrose (soon,) and slightly more complex sugars like maltodextrin (over time.) Gatoraide's new G formulas add things like protein for longer term energy and recovery, but most endurance racers opt for things like dried fruit.

    There are also some strategies that can increase glycogen stores. Generally, this becomes a major training issue for exercise over 90 min, i.e. centuries. Essentially, you cut back on carbs a bit for three days, then eat more than usual the three days before the event.

    - Not Carleton
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrodzilla View Post
    I ride fixed because I'm mad at my parents. **** you Mom!

  18. #1043
    Rhythm is rhythm max5480's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info, Sillygolem.

    Quote Originally Posted by hairnet View Post
    The year I decided to stop drinking soda/sweet drinks I lost 20 lbs. It was marvelous.
    So Harinet, do you drink any electrolyte enhanced water on longer rides or do you just eat dried fruit and energy bars?

    I'm just curious because I'm doing a century this weekend. I don't drink sugar water ever; usually just take dried fruit, Larabars, fruit leather, and other energy bars on longer rides.
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  19. #1044
    Elitist carleton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sillygolem View Post
    Your body uses oxygenated hydrocarbon chains in one form or another, which at some point is converted into ATP for use by cells. How fast it gets converted into ATP depends on its structure.

    Glucose (aka dextrose) is carried in your bloodstream for quick access as fuel. Uptake is used to test for diabetes: The orange soda used in these tests is Lucozade, which is popular as an energy drink in the UK.

    Alcohols and fructose undergo a process that produces uric acid, which can cause arterial damage and leads to gout. If you eat fruit, you get relatively low amounts of fructose, and the fiber keeps all of it from being absorbed. On the other hand, soda is loaded with it and it all gets absorbed, which makes eating high fructose syrup a problem. However, making it usable for cells is relatively fast.

    Plain sugar is sucrose, a molecule made up of a glucose and a fructose. These are broken apart before being converted, so it takes a little longer than HFCS to use.

    Lactose is galactose (another simple sugar) hooked to a glucose. Starches are complex combinations of simple sugars, proteins are hydrocarbon chains with a little nitrogen and sometimes sulfur thrown in, and fats are a glycerin molecule with 1-3 attached hydrocarbon chains. All these take longer to break down, so they provide long-term energy.

    Glycogen is the animal equivalent of starch. It's stored in the liver and muscles, and designed for quick breakdown to fuel your body. When you run out, you bonk.

    Complex carbohydrates and lean protein are recommended for diets because their slow release keeps your blood sugar from bouncing around. However, when you're exercising, you want to get glucose ready ASAP to keep from using up your glycogen and bonking.

    Sports drinks and energy gels use some sort of sugar combination to keep your body fueled in the short term: Normally this will be dextrose (now,) fructose and sucrose (soon,) and slightly more complex sugars like maltodextrin (over time.) Gatoraide's new G formulas add things like protein for longer term energy and recovery, but most endurance racers opt for things like dried fruit.

    There are also some strategies that can increase glycogen stores. Generally, this becomes a major training issue for exercise over 90 min, i.e. centuries. Essentially, you cut back on carbs a bit for three days, then eat more than usual the three days before the event.

    - Not Carleton
    What he said.


    Thanks!

  20. #1045
    Fresh Garbage hairnet's Avatar
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    Well, a few weeks ago I did two back to back centuries and ate a few oranges, apples, baked potatoes, and cliff bars. I drank to make sure I did not become thirst and ate small amounts frequently to not get hungry. I also went with Hammer's Perpetuem -- or you can make your own sugar carb. drink.

    I have relied on drinks and other sport products on other long rides. That sucks because after a while you begin to feel sick because you haven't actually eaten any solids. I packed PB&J sandwiches with me all the time when I was going 50+ mile rides several times a week.

    I am no expert by faaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.
    All that no soda stuff goes out the window on long rides if I feel like I need a boost.
    Last edited by hairnet; 09-13-11 at 05:36 PM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrodzilla View Post
    I'd rather ride a greasy bowling ball than one of those things.
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  21. #1046
    yoked homebrewk's Avatar
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    Dear Carleton,

    Do you think white brifter hoods on the CAAD 10 would look good? I think that the front end of the bike has too much black and I want to balance it out. (in b4 datsracist.gif) Thanks!

    Pic:


  22. #1047
    Fresh Garbage hairnet's Avatar
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    Do you want to clean your hoods after every ride?
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrodzilla View Post
    I'd rather ride a greasy bowling ball than one of those things.
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  23. #1048
    yoked homebrewk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hairnet View Post
    Do you want to clean your hoods after every ride?
    No, but I don't think it will be an issue. It's no different than having white bar tape (unless you have LizardSkins, of course)

  24. #1049
    Fresh Garbage hairnet's Avatar
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    I had some yellow hoods on my first bike. five minutes of riding and they would be black
    Quote Originally Posted by Scrodzilla View Post
    I'd rather ride a greasy bowling ball than one of those things.
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  25. #1050
    THE STUFFED Leukybear's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by homebrewk View Post
    No, but I don't think it will be an issue. It's no different than having white bar tape (unless you have LizardSkins, of course)
    Lizardskins are not made out the same thing as hoods are (rubber usually); magic is required to make lizard skins

    Anyhow white rubber tend to go either permanently (due to the porous nature of rubber) grey or yellow rather quickly. BUT you can get some borrowed time by cleaning white hoods thoroughly after every ride; prevention is key here.

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