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Thread: And Book Status

  1. #1
    Resident Alien Racer Ex's Avatar
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    And Book Status

    I know most track folks are troglodytes and can barely manage picture books, but some of the best cycling writing recently has been track-centric.

    Heroes, Villains and Velodromes:

    Great read about UK Cycling and Hoy

    Race Against Time:

    Boardman v. Obree premise but a lot more.

    Chris Hoy: Autobiography

    Reading now, I'll let you know

    Flying Scotsman:

    Obree. Still the most innovative cycling thinker in the last 30 years.

    Parse through these and there's nuggets of gold and at least a lot of entertainment value if you're engaged in the process.

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    Elitist carleton's Avatar
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    This is a good read: Heroes, Villains & Velodromes: Chris Hoy & Britain's Track Cycling Revolution: Richard Moore: 9780007265312: Amazon.com: Books



    It's written by a journalist. It's 1/2 about Hoy and 1/2 about the rise of British Cycling to what it is today. Good read.

    Heroes, Villains and Velodromes reveals how an elite athlete, Chris Hoy, lives, breathes and pushes the boundaries of his sport. How does he do it? And why? What drives him to put his body through the physical and mental hurdles to become the best in the world? This is also the story of an extraordinary year in the life of an extraordinary sportsman, one which started with his best-ever world championships in Mallorca—where, for the first time in his career, he became a double world champion—continued with his attempt on the world kilometer record in La Paz, Bolivia, went on to Japan where he spent three months riding the crazy keirin circuit, before returning to training at the world-class Manchester velodrome in the buildup to the 2008 Beijing Olympics.By shadowing Hoy through a season with the British track cycling team, author Richard Moore has gained an unembellished insight into the mind of a world champion. He has also attained unprecedented levels of access to the key members of the all-conquering British team (which smashed all records and dominated the 2007 world championships) and support staff, including top coaches, world-renowned psychiatrists, doctors (where the subject of drug abuse is an ever-present shadow), and the pivotal characters behind the scenes. Combining his forensic knowledge of the cycling world with his acclaimed skills as a tenacious investigative journalist, Moore captures the mood of the British team and explores an area of professional sport that has rarely been seen before.
    Last edited by carleton; 02-09-15 at 09:50 PM.

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    Elitist carleton's Avatar
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    The Rider



    http://www.amazon.com/The-Rider-Tim-.../dp/1582342903


    It takes you along for the thoughts of a guy during a long road race. It's really, really good.

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    Resident Alien Racer Ex's Avatar
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    I enjoyed Krabbe. I have a couple of books on Major Taylor, including this one:

    Major Taylor: The Extraordinary Career of a Champion Bicycle Racer: Andrew Ritchie: 9780801853036: Amazon.com: Books

    Reading any bio on him you have to wish you could go back in time and have a seat in the Garden for a Madison. As big or bigger a star than Babe Ruth and as much a racial pioneer as Jackie Robinson. Huge shame that his story is known by so few today.

    For obscure track fiction, if you have lived or spent time in the SF Bay Area this is hard to beat:

    https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/96740

    Set in 1952 it's a blend of real people and places and imagination.
    Last edited by Racer Ex; 02-10-15 at 12:19 AM.

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    The Hour.jpg

    Interesting and humorous (British humor).

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    Reg Harris.jpg

    I was disappointed to learn that apart from the world championships and Olympics just about all professional sprint races were fixed in the 1950 time frame.

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    Has anyone read "Track Cycling: Training and Racing" by Michael Mahesh? If so is this book worth buying?

    Quote from Amazon page:
    There are many books and resources dedicated to the sport of Road Cycling and Triathlon racing, but none which I know of dedicated to training and racing for Track Cycling. Track Cycling is a niche / cult sport in the US and probably in other Countries; maybe that is why no one has bothered writing a book for this rather small target audience. The information in this book was gleaned over the years and comes from a variety of sources. It would certainly be great to have a comprehensive book dedicated to tactics & training for Track Cycling. Many new comers to the track have to learn by trial and error which can become quite time consuming and expensive. Track coaches are rare and costly, and only available to elite riders or those who can afford them. Hopefully this book can give you some direction on how to proceed into the fast paced world of Track Cycling.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 700wheel View Post
    Has anyone read "Track Cycling: Training and Racing" by Michael Mahesh? If so is this book worth buying?

    Quote from Amazon page:
    There are many books and resources dedicated to the sport of Road Cycling and Triathlon racing, but none which I know of dedicated to training and racing for Track Cycling. Track Cycling is a niche / cult sport in the US and probably in other Countries; maybe that is why no one has bothered writing a book for this rather small target audience. The information in this book was gleaned over the years and comes from a variety of sources. It would certainly be great to have a comprehensive book dedicated to tactics & training for Track Cycling. Many new comers to the track have to learn by trial and error which can become quite time consuming and expensive. Track coaches are rare and costly, and only available to elite riders or those who can afford them. Hopefully this book can give you some direction on how to proceed into the fast paced world of Track Cycling.
    I bought it and flipped through it, but never really read it cover to cover. It's basically a book full of everything Mike learned while racing at Kissena, so I think it's useful for a beginner getting into track, but for most racers it'll just be a re-hash of what they already know or just so specific to kissena that it's useless for other tracks. It looks like they give you a sizeable preview of the book on amazon, so flip through and see if you think it's worthwhile. Some of what he wrote is also on his blog (kissenatrackracing.blogspot.com).

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    For track, my favorite book is "No Brakes! Bicycle Track Racing in the United States" by Sandra Sutherland. It's a little bit of a time capsule at this point, but it has interesting content, like interviews with some big names in american track cycling in the mid '90s.

    As for general cycling-related books (though it does have a section on track racing) I absolutely love "Need for the Bike" by Paul Fournel. It's just a compilation of short stories (a couple of pages max) about all different aspects of cycling, from getting your first bike, to the smell of the road after a rain storm, and so on. It really reverberates with me and I can't recommend it enough.

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    Not 100% track, more about exercise during pregnancy, but she did have a child a few weeks before winning World Masters pursuit (in first year of racing) and it's still an interesting read: Pregnancy to Podium: My journey challenging the myths about exercise with bump and beyond: Amazon.co.uk: Susie Mitchell: 9781492994695: Books

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