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  1. #1
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    Roadbike training for xc racing

    Is a roadbike a great advantage for training for someone who wants to do xc racing.
    I have been told this by two seperate sales people at 2 bike shops, but of course this is after they did some poking around as to what sort of riding I do.Which is xc and I am just now getting the racing bug.
    Looking for a training edge........I do have a hardtail (speciaIized rockhopper pro comp)I use on the road for long dist riding/trainning.
    Any advice will be greatly appreciated............THX!!!!!!

  2. #2
    Evil Genius capsicum's Avatar
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    Road riding will focus more on the stamina and the muscle output, because your not slowing for technical bits. off road is needed occationaly for those technical skills but to your question yes road riding is good XC training.

    A roadbike for training is not nessesary, it does tend to be more comfortable on long rides and the extra speed helps to make the long rides less of a chore.

    You must be careful to measure your training in time, not miles. For instance if your ziping along merrily, wind at your back, downhill, hardly pedaling and cover 5 miles in a blink thats not much of a workout; but if you stick that bike on a trainer and romp on those pedals(spinning or not what ever you choice that day) for two hours, or if you set out hard into a stiff headwind, you won't go very far or fast(trainer goes nowhere) but its a heck of a workout.

    The ol' salesmen were telling me what they told you, "Faster spinning, yada yada" but I can spin on any bike, just shift down a gear or speed up. A roadbike will just make you think your faster because it's like having a slight tailwind.

    That said I finally bought an old steel schwinn road bike to train and commute on. Its heavy but like I said above- speed doesn't matter in training, it's all about time at effort.
    "Data is not the plural form of annecdote."
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  3. #3
    bac
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    Quote Originally Posted by capsicum
    A roadbike for training is not nessesary, it does tend to be more comfortable on long rides and the extra speed helps to make the long rides less of a chore.
    Yup, but for me, it is more than just that. A true road bike will afford you the opportunity, in the same period of time, to cover more distance, and broaden your horizons in terms of roads, etc. In other words, riding a road bike, relative to a mtb with slick tires, will increase the available riding area around your home/base.

  4. #4
    Dude who rides bike BikeInMN's Avatar
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    Most of the big motor MTB racers I know train almost 100% on the road. Be it trail access/conditions or just plain old wear and tear on a high end MTB, it just makes sense to train on the road.

  5. #5
    Evil Genius capsicum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bac
    Yup, but for me, it is more than just that. A true road bike will afford you the opportunity, in the same period of time, to cover more distance, and broaden your horizons in terms of roads, etc. In other words, riding a road bike, relative to a mtb with slick tires, will increase the available riding area around your home/base.
    Thats what I said, faster makes it less boring.
    "Data is not the plural form of annecdote."
    "yuo ned to be deadurcated"

  6. #6
    Climbing Fool terrymorse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeInMN
    Most of the big motor MTB racers I know train almost 100% on the road. Be it trail access/conditions or just plain old wear and tear on a high end MTB, it just makes sense to train on the road.
    It's also much easier to get a quality workout on the road.
    Managing Director, Undiscovered Country Tours

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    Quote Originally Posted by terrymorse
    It's also much easier to get a quality workout on the road.

    I notice that when I ride on a trail on my MTB I can sustain a higher HR. Does a higher HR not equal a better work out?

  8. #8
    Climbing Fool terrymorse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by oakleydo
    I notice that when I ride on a trail on my MTB I can sustain a higher HR. Does a higher HR not equal a better work out?
    There are many distractions on a trail that prevent maintaining a high intensity effort for an extended amount of time.

    Does a higher HR mean a better workout? Only if high HR is your training goal for that session.
    Managing Director, Undiscovered Country Tours

  9. #9
    BloomBikeShop.com BloomBikeShop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by terrymorse
    There are many distractions on a trail that prevent maintaining a high intensity effort for an extended amount of time.

    Does a higher HR mean a better workout? Only if high HR is your training goal for that session.
    Other than "pretend" xc mtb races where I'm just trying to simulate a race, I'd prefer to control my HR during the workout... much much much easier on the road.

    ever try a recovery ride off-road? it won't happen!

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