Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Senior Member Pedal Wench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,046
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Women and carbo-loading

    Hi Folks - not sure if I should post here or the women's forum, but I'll start here.

    I've heard people saying that women process carbs differently than men. Basically, that carbo-loading doesn't work for us, and we need to maintain a steady stream of carbs while we're riding. This was the first I heard about this. Anyone know anything more about this?

  2. #2
    Senior Member kf5nd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX 77095
    My Bikes
    Specialized Sequoia Elite, Schwinn Frontier FS MTB, Centurion LeMans (1986)
    Posts
    1,470
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've never heard that... and the nutritionist who consults with our club is female
    Peter Wang, LCI
    Houston, TX USA

  3. #3
    Guest
    Guest
    Never heard of it.

    Koffee

  4. #4
    Focus on the future alison_in_oh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    718
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by 3cannondales
    Hi Folks - not sure if I should post here or the women's forum, but I'll start here.

    I've heard people saying that women process carbs differently than men. Basically, that carbo-loading doesn't work for us, and we need to maintain a steady stream of carbs while we're riding. This was the first I heard about this. Anyone know anything more about this?
    "Carbo-loading" as it's usually meant (pasta dinner before a ride) doesn't work for *anyone*. "Carbo-loading" as scientifically applied through a multi-day process of glycogen depletion and supercompensation *sucks*.

    The best theory my student doctor hubby and I could come up with is that women have less muscle mass therefore less muscle glycogen storage. It does seem that I'm more dependent on my hourly refueling than he -- after a Clif bar for us each at the 1.5 hour mark on this weekend's ride, I was grouchy and low-blood-sugary at almost 3 hours while he didn't even bother to eat until we got home. (A Larabar in my tummy and I was golden!) But then, for the same speed I'm working at higher intensity -- he'll be pulling me at a HR of 130 (primarily fat-burning intensity) while my HR is in the 160s (approaching LT and transferring to more carbo-fueled work).

  5. #5
    bikin'barbie
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    st. louis, MO
    Posts
    68
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Women do however typically store less glycogen than men because they do not typically carry as much muscle mass.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    9
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Most effective way for both men and women to carboload is to increase carb intake to around 70% of total energy intake, in conjunction with decrease in training volume during final 5-7days pre-event. Increase intensity and reduce duration to aid speed work and include light active recovery sessions. Former method of carboloading known as supercompensation rarely works (1-2 times per season) and therefore has been ditched by majority of athletes (including marathon runners where this method originated).

  7. #7
    Jungle lady cbhungry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Atlanta, Georgia
    My Bikes
    gary fisher cake
    Posts
    849
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by powells2
    Women do however typically store less glycogen than men because they do not typically carry as much muscle mass.
    True, when women do better at ultralong distance events (don't seem to hit the wall as much) it is because women have higher fat mass (because during these ultra long distance events, both men and women have long used up their glycogen reserve) and women can dip into their fat reserve for a longer period of time.

    The upshot is when you engage in moderate to strenuous excercise you burn, glucose... when that is used up, glycogen.... and when that is used up, fat. And yeah, men have higher amounts of stored glycogen. However, both women and men benefit from carbo loading as Athletekitch stated. (Now if you were to do a slow, easy walk the order of fuel usage hierarchy would be glucose then straight to fat with very little glycogen reserve used up.)
    Ride forever, work whenever.
    XX power
    Eat more mud, mountain bike 'till you die!

    http://www.pnhp.org/

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,295
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've read a lot, if not most, of the more recent cycle training and nutrition books by the "big" names. I don't train by them, I'm just interested in the technology. While some may mention a woman's issue, none mentioned burning carbs differently.

    I have a male friend who does long distance cycling. He's done the 1200 km Paris/Brest/Paris. He looks chubby as he loves to eat. He claims the extra fat helps on those long rides which is consistent with Jungle Lady's comment.

    Al

  9. #9
    Senior Member Pedal Wench's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    2,046
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks folks. I've always noticed a difference in how my BF and I 'fuel' when we're hiking (long-distance). Usually we stop and take breaks at the same time, and I guess I've been hesitant to ask to stop too often (wanna tough it out, you know...) but I've bonked hard on a few hikes long before he's had a problem. It makes a little more sense now.

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Washington State
    My Bikes
    Cannondale R500
    Posts
    15
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Alison is right on. I takes a week to do carbo loading properly. You have to deplete your glycogen stores as completely as possible (very low carbs), then go to the gym a few days before your event, work every muscle you can to exhaustion with high rep low intensity lifting, then massive amounts of carbs every 2 hours or so for 24 hours. Your muscles will soak up glycogen like a sponge. The morning of the event your legs will actually ache a little until you get pedaling because they are swelled from the super loading of stored glycogen. I've done it twice for double century rides (STP) with amazing results. My second 100 miles was faster than the first 100 both times. If you don't do it properly you're wasting your time. If you're still interested, get the full scoop on how to do it in Dr Michael Colgans book "Optimum Sports Nutrition."

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •