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  1. #1
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    Felt awful - don't know what happened - help?

    I have concerns about something that happened this weekend. I am new to biking distances over 10-15 miles and am trying to train for a 170 mile, 2 day charity ride coming up in 2 weeks. This weekend I rode my longest distance yet (30 miles) then got off the bike to start doing my stretches. I stretched and then went to do some ab work. I was feeling fine. After the ab work I suddenly got extremely nauseated. I didn't vomit but felt like I could just throw up water. I didn't even have a chance to stand up from the ab routine before it hit me. The 8 minute ab DVD ended and I got sick.

    I started to feel better after I ate a big dinner. Then at night I had what seemed to be heart palpitations. I couldn't get to sleep and seemed very anxious ( I do have a problem with an anxiety disorder).

    Today I didn't feel well off and on. I am still anxious and having a bit of the palpitations. I should note that I did have a stress test last fall and that I am 30. I had the stress test because I was having chest pains. They found nothing and think it is just acid reflux. Actually, I had a test done for acid reflux and I have confirmation that I do have it.

    But now I am completely freaked out about this big ride coming up. What did I do wrong on the 30 mile ride? I felt fine! Did I not drink enough? Too much? Too much Gatorade? I didn't finish my bottle of Gatorade on a 2 hour ride. I ate a Clif bar at the 1 hour mark and stopped to stretch. Can I just not handle the sugar in Gatorade? Was it the ab workout?

    I just don't understand what happened. I am afraid I can't do this ride and I don't know what to tell the sponsors. Was this just one incident where something was off like doing the ab workout pushed me over the edge or what? I don't know if I should quit or not. I feel okay right now. Did I just overdo it? Am I overtraining? If that is the case then I am screwed. Thirty miles isn't that far for this to happen although I have read it is easy to overtrain in cycling since your legs do all the work. I have also heard other people say that they didn't feel that well when they first started riding either. I just don't know what to think and I am worried something is wrong that the doctors didn't catch.

    I am so upset right now (which isn't helping matters I know). Any guidance would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Powered by: meradi's Avatar
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    I don't know your location, but maybe it was just too hot? I've felt somewhat similarly when it's too hot outside and I do too much.

    I'm sure someone else more familiar with training and how much is OK will come along to share advice, but as far as anxiety goes, your mind can really play tricks on you! I'm sure you're already aware of that though. Sounds like you're awfully worried about the upcoming ride and its associated pressures.

    Good luck!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Pedal Wench's Avatar
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    Did you allow time for your heart rate to slow down before doing the ab work? I know it's dangerous to lower your below your heart (or the same level) when the heart is still pounding. Sounds more like you need to check with your doctor!

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    Actually, I am about 4 hours north of you! It was pretty cool here yesterday, probably 60-65 with some good winds.

    The thing is I was really feeling like maybe this ride was an attainable goal. I did the 30 miles and felt fine. I wanted to do more. Then I finish the ab workout and I feel like crud!

    And yup, now I am nervous.

  5. #5
    Ottrott SE Rider Apollo's Avatar
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    If you think you need to go see a doc, but I've felt in similar disstress if I've pushed myself too hard. Its easy to do when you're around other people and you want to keep up.

    ~Apollo

  6. #6
    Upgrading my engine DXchulo's Avatar
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    I don't want to be a big jerk, and hopefully what I'm going to say just turns into motivation for you to prove me wrong, but if 30 miles is your longest ride it's going to be really tough to make it to your goal in only 2 weeks. Did you really mean 2 weeks? Maybe you meant 2 months. Many people agree not to increase your mileages by more than 10% at a time, so you need a lot more time to get all the way up in the 80s and 90s.

  7. #7
    sch
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    Did you eat a decent meal before the ride? Sounds like hypoglycemia of the exercise induced variety, also known as the bonk. A few years ago I ran across an article suggesting you could accelerate fat burning/wgt loss by not eating except 8-12oz of a gatorade type drink and a cup of coffee, sugar but no cream (no fat) and riding 20miles. I felt horrible at the end of that ride. Had to really chow down to recover. My miles to ride before running out of energy has a lot to do with how much I ate and how long before the ride I ate. It varies from low thirties upto low 50s a few yrs ago. Now I usually start to get the early signs in the 38-45mi range. Steve

  8. #8
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    Nope, I meant 2 weeks and I agree with you. A lot of people told me this was something I could do, that it was no big deal. My friend talked me into it and she is no athlete. I figured if she could do it, I could. No one has done much to discourage me except myself and I never seem to listen to myself. And maybe I shouldn't be listening to myself. I just don't know.

    I am going to talk to one of the ride organizer tomorrow. I already wrote him and told him what happened. We are going to have to work something out. I am not going to kill myself over this but I also don't want to bow out if I don't need to.

    Maybe I can just spend a lot of time on the sag wagon. I pretty much gave up pride this weekend. I'd rather hitch a ride than have a bad weekend and hate the sport for eternity or hurt myself.

    I am just confused.

  9. #9
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    I think I just had some cereal and an apple. I guess that wasn't enough. Plus, the day before I didn't eat much because I had some kind of weird stomach ache. I completely forgot about that. I think I just maybe need to eat more. I really don't eat that much.

    Maybe I just had/have a bug of some kind.

    And TMI, but it is PMS time too...

  10. #10
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    And about a doc visit, I am not sure what they would do. I had my heart checked out in October. I had insulin levels and adrenal function, etc checked out in March as part of a physical. I can always call in the morning and set up an appointment. Nothing is going to be resolved in time I don't think though.

    A lot of things that I experience get chalked up to anxiety. But I don't really think this incident was entirely anxiety. I think the after effects I have been experiencing are due to anxiety but I think the incident was blood sugar related. I am thinking I should have just rested after the ride and not jumped into the ab routine. I did rest between the bike ride and the ab workout, btw. I drank a bit and did a lot of stretching.

    I don't know. I want to kick my friend and the ride coach who convinced me to do this and then kick myself.

    I don't have a very positive attitude tonight. Sorry. If I can't ride it is going to be very hard to tell people.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by lepus
    Sorry. If I can't ride it is going to be very hard to tell people.
    Lepus, I have a post-graduate degree and reasonably good manners, BUT sometimes there is only one way to say a thing correctly: "F*** other people."

    Ride for yourself! Go as fast or as slow as you want to. Wear a professional biking team kit or a baggy Hawaiian shirt. This forum has a jillion contributors and while we have a lot in common, the most important thing we do is ride. Just do it at a pace and in a manner you enjoy and quite worrying.

    Tyson

  12. #12
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    Presuming that you do not have a medical problem (I am not a doctor, so no medical advice) then it certainly sounds like you have overextended yourself. You doubled your normal mileage from 15 to 30 miles, then you went on to do some strength exercises on top of that. This does not seem to be a very well thought out conditioning plan.

    First off, you should not be pushing yourself on the bike so hard. The general rule of thumb for bike endurance conditioning is to increase your weekly mileage by no more than 10% per week. As you can probably figure, from where you are now, doing 80 miles on two consecutive days is going to be difficult (I'd say impossible, but people do sometime manage the incredible). Unless you're a marathon runner who just switched to cycling, I'd recommend swollowing your pride, skipping the upcoming big ride, and start working toward the next one.

    Second, when you decide to go all out and set new cycling records, perhaps you should slack off on the strength building. At least wait a few hours and have a meal first. You're likely to be a bit low on muscle glycogen and aren't likely to be at your best anyway. At 30 years old, you have plenty of time left to get in shape.

    You say that you have some 'ride coach' who convinced you that you can do this ride? With two weeks training? I hope you are not paying for his services. And your friend sonds like someone who doesn't remember what it was like to build endurance.

  13. #13
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    The "ride coach" was someone involved with the ride. Obviously, his opinion was not completely unbiased since it is part of his job to bring riders in. Since they have no liability concerning what happens to you on the ride either I can see where he would just be interested in some warm bodies on bikes, although a death or severe injury on a ride can kill a ride's rep pretty quickly.

    But it wasn't only he who made me feel that I could do this ride. It seemed like a Herculean feat to me but so many other people seemed to think otherwise. I consulted with people. I talked to people who had done charity rides before. No one tried to dissuade me until tonight.

    I would love to do another ride but I doubt anyone is going to sponsor me again once I tell them I am not riding this one. I better at least be able to get on crew so I can salvage some respect (not to mention my freaking $65 entry fee). I think it will be free group rides for me for quite a while.

    I know I shouldn't care what other people think but it is hard to let down people who have sponsored up to $500 in my name. I have no idea what to tell them.

    And I certainly was not out to set any cycling records. I was just out to not disappoint my sponsors and myself.
    Last edited by lepus; 05-23-05 at 01:46 AM.

  14. #14
    Respect Your Hill spindog's Avatar
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    Lepus-

    How about just letting your sponsors know that you have been experiencing chest pain and was advised by your medical doctor to back off your training and that you will not be able to cycle that distance this year? Sounds very reasonable and their donations are still going to the cause.

    However, you could still volunteer for the charity event by getting involved with working at one of the rest stops or registration, etc. This way you will get to mingle with lots of riders from different abilities and see what they are experiencing and get training ideas - maybe meet prospective training partners.

    You will still take part in the event and will be doing a SMART thing by allowing yourself more time to train and condition yourself for a long ride that will be enjoyable rather than scary and painful for you. 170 miles is a lot if your longest ride has only been 30 miles and you are not feeling well. Skip the ride, volunteer and be motivated from others to train properly and be ready to kick butt next time.

    Just an idea. Good luck.

  15. #15
    CRIKEY!!!!!!! Cyclaholic's Avatar
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    Lepus, I'm glad you're OK now. I'm certainly not a doctor but all I can say is that I think you should listen to yourself first and foremost. If your body is saying 'I've had enough, here's some pain to let you know that it's a good idea to slow down' then you should listen to that.

    And that "ride coach" aint no ride coach, sounds to me like he's more of a promoter with a vested interest ahead of what's best for you. Unwittingly, so are others you are talking to, by the sounds of things. I'm sure that if you explain to sponsors that there's medical reasons why you can't do the ride they will understand and if they don't then screw them, they don't care if you get hurt, you don't need that. Ultimately your health is far more important.

    Gab.

  16. #16
    Positio, ergo sum! Bécane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lepus
    I think I just had some cereal and an apple. I guess that wasn't enough. Plus, the day before I didn't eat much because I had some kind of weird stomach ache. I completely forgot about that. I think I just maybe need to eat more. I really don't eat that much. ...
    Indeed you should eat more and more often. Do not limit yourself to only 3 meals per day.

    Being your first 30 miles ride ever and maybe the first time your doing any kind of endurance sport your body is experiencing something new. It is tapping on your resources and consuming a lot of fuel.

    Eat! Eat more! Eat smart!

  17. #17
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    It's not unusual for some people to feel a little nauseous after a big ride, especially if you're not used to the distance. The big meal afterward probably upset things also.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Pedal Wench's Avatar
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    You know, the rule of thumb to build up endurance is to increase your mileage by 10% a week. That being said, if you're in decent shape, you might be able to do a one-time event like you're planning. Just make the most out of the next two weeks. Cut out all exercise except for the biking. Eat, eat, eat - especially on the ride day. Take lots of breaks, eat a lot, drink a bunch, rest, and you might be able to do it. As long as it's sagged - you might as well give it a shot - you never know what you're capable of when you're in the middle of the experience, with new riders around you, supported reststops, and sag wagons checking up on you.

  19. #19
    Senior Member jennings780's Avatar
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    Lepus:

    Stress and anxiety can cause all sorts of physical symptoms. I had stress induced anxiety issues a few years ago. My doctor pointed out that stress and anxiety often causes digestive track problems. That our minds and our "gut" is connected. That is why when you are worried you feel "sick to your stomach" - when nervous you get "butterflies."

    I had all sorts of physical symptoms from anxiety. I felt like I had a lump in my throat all the time, I had nausea off and on, diahrrea sometimes, acid reflux - I also was sure I was having heart problems periodically. I really thought I had huge medical problems.

    I was able to solve all these physical symptoms by controlling the anxiety. I controlled the anxiety by meditating daily, doing breathing exercises and by doing yoga a few times a week. Everything is fine now.

    While it is a good idea to get medical advice, realize that many doctors are trained to give drugs to treat symptoms. You may want to ask a lot of questions about how to cure the likely cause - the anxiety - over the long term. My doctor wanted to put me on xanax. I didn't want to be on drugs long term so I went out and researched what to do for anxiety on my own.

    I highly recommend: the cd "Breathing" by Dr. Andrew Weil and the book "Wherever You Go, There You Are" by Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn.

    Don't worry about feeling bad after biking. Take it slow. Do the big ride next year.

  20. #20
    Upgrading my engine DXchulo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spindog
    Lepus-

    How about just letting your sponsors know that you have been experiencing chest pain and was advised by your medical doctor to back off your training and that you will not be able to cycle that distance this year? Sounds very reasonable and their donations are still going to the cause.

    However, you could still volunteer for the charity event by getting involved with working at one of the rest stops or registration, etc. This way you will get to mingle with lots of riders from different abilities and see what they are experiencing and get training ideas - maybe meet prospective training partners.

    You will still take part in the event and will be doing a SMART thing by allowing yourself more time to train and condition yourself for a long ride that will be enjoyable rather than scary and painful for you. 170 miles is a lot if your longest ride has only been 30 miles and you are not feeling well. Skip the ride, volunteer and be motivated from others to train properly and be ready to kick butt next time.

    Just an idea. Good luck.
    This is the best advice out there. You could try to push yourself through the 170 miles, but it would most likely be a miserable 170 miles that may ruin your taste for cycling for good.

    Don't beat yourself up about it. It really sounds like it's that one guy's fault for trying to push you into the ride even though he should have known that you wouldn't be ready for it in time. As far as the people who donated, those donations are probably tax deductable anyway. Yeah, I know...that doesn't help.

    The best thing you can do right now is to focus on next year so you can come back and do it right to make all of your sponsors proud. Or heck, get properly trained and ride 170 miles in two days on your own just to get that monkey off of your back. That way the sponsors will get what they paid for in the end, and I doubt they will care about the delay. Meanwhile, turn your anxiety into motivation for the future and go out and kick some ass.

  21. #21
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    i've had palpitations (pvc's) when i overtrain. it sounds like you threw yourself into things a bit too quickly. some people are totally capable of jumping right in and doing 170 miles in two days with little or no training, but those are usually people with a substantial lifetime base at some endurance sport or another.

    i agree with the others - your health is more important than the ride. i say train to do it next year, apply now and tell your sponsors that for health reasons you have postponed things until then. you can return their money, or keep it for next year if they're willing.

    PROUD SPONSOR of the 2005 GS Boulder cycling team.

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