Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 31
  1. #1
    Resident Silent Dissident Devoidarex's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Port Coquitlam, BC
    My Bikes
    2005 Hardrock Sport
    Posts
    33
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    How Long Do I Need To Ride?

    I bought a mountain bike in order to get into shape. My goal is to lose 25-30 pounds.

    Assuming I can ride 4 or 5 times a week, how long should I aim to stay on the bike (at a MINIMUM) in order to see some reasonable results. I'm not expecting to lose 15 pounds a month or anything, but I would like to see a noticeable difference by September.

    I will be riding a relatively flat, packed-gravel trail, with a goal of maintaining a good cadence, rather than a particular speed.

    So, when I head out the door, how long should I expect to ride before I can return home without feeling guilty?
    2005 Specialized Hardrock Sport

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    587
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Not to be a wise ass...this kind of depends an where you are starting from. I started as a old fat git and even 40min every two or three days made weight loss a treat...but if you are last years' decathalon champ...uhhh ramp it up!!! There are some really smart people on this forum (other than me) and maybe give them some details...

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    587
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    uhhhh just one more thing, this riding bit is really fun. If you do it from that perspective (ie. not a forced march into hell) you will achieve whatever your goal happens to be. make it fun, do it when it is fun, find places/people that are fun

  4. #4
    Resident Silent Dissident Devoidarex's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Port Coquitlam, BC
    My Bikes
    2005 Hardrock Sport
    Posts
    33
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, I chose cycling because it is fun for me. The thing is that I don't want to head home before I've even started burning calories.

    Where am I starting from? An out of shape, overweight 30 year old who wants to lose 25-30 pounds.
    2005 Specialized Hardrock Sport

  5. #5
    .
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    .
    My Bikes
    .
    Posts
    3,094
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Try an hour, I'm fat'n'out of shape myself and that's a basic rule for me, although I'm often riding more than an hour, an hour's a good guideline. A nice ride for me is here to Palo Alto, a few towns over, which takes an hour, then have some coffee etc in downtown Palo Alto then take the train back. (I take my bike on the train, the ticket's cheap, then bike from the train station home, which is a short hop.)

  6. #6
    Enjoying the ride Yield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    My Bikes
    Trek 850, Giant OCR2
    Posts
    38
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    An hour sounds good to me. And if you don't feel like you did much in that hour, then maybe it's not the time but how hard you rode during that time. Get a computer if you don't already have one, and set mileage and/or cadence goals for yourself. Start off at whatever pace you feel comfortable with and go from there. Keep bumping the mileage goal up every time/every few times you ride while keeping the time the same.

    two cents from the new kid

  7. #7
    Stegosaurus Crunkologist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Goa, India
    My Bikes
    2004 Giant OCR-3
    Posts
    1,530
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Ride as long as you can. You should be sore for a day or two. Do it again. If you're not sore for a day after, then ride longer. RIde every day, by feel. It will get easier and easier.

    Answer: as much as you can, without hurting yourself.
    "A conservative is a liberal who's been mugged.
    A liberal is a conservative who's been arrested."

  8. #8
    Evil Genius capsicum's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Sumner, WA
    My Bikes
    '92 novara ponderosa, '74 schwinn le tour, Novara fusion, novara transfer, novara randonee(2), novara careema pro, novara bonita(2).
    Posts
    1,486
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    General information to help your calculations.

    Figure 35-50 calories per mile depending on wind resistance from riding faster/slower or from head/tailwinds. This starts the first mile, calories are energy/heat, like kilowatt hours or BTU.

    4,100 calories in a pound of fat, 1,800 in a dry pound of carbs, or 9 calories per gram of fat and 4 calories per gram of carbs.

    In-muscle carbs are stored with water, which is released when the carbs are burned, the storage ratio is 1 ounce of carb with 4 ounces of water, this water is where most of the one day weight loss comes from and will quickly be replaced, the body's muscles can hold up to a pound of carbs. Once fully stocked the muscles will turn away carbs which will then be converted into fat.

    Fat burn is maximum at a medium to medium-high intensity(med is relaxed conversations can be had maybe a heart rate of 120, med-high involves some solid huffing and puffing). When you get to very high intensity fat burn drops off(very high meaning, close to race pace/ can't say more than a couple words). These ranges are general because the specific intensities are highly variable from person to person.

    In the end it comes down to total calories in, verses total calories burned. Burned being, base metabolism(1500-2000 cal per day depending on person) plus exorsize burn. Basically if you burn fat great, if you burn carbs that clears space for carb storage. Both are always being burned to some extent.
    "Data is not the plural form of annecdote."
    "I'd loves me a new Cannondale, but I pull moths, not dollars, from my pants' stuff-holder-holes." "yuo ned to be deadurcated"

  9. #9
    Resident Silent Dissident Devoidarex's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Port Coquitlam, BC
    My Bikes
    2005 Hardrock Sport
    Posts
    33
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for the replies so far.

    Some questions...

    1) Do I really have to be sore after a ride to know that I've done good work? It seems to me that if I'm running for an hour at a medium heart-rate (to burn fat), then that shouldn't make me sore, as opposed to pedaling up a hill for an hour, where I can see how my thighs would be dead the next day.

    2) If the rate is around 35-50 calories a mile, how can I translate this into cadence? I'm not really sure of my mileage (actually, kilometerage). I attempt to maintain a steady pedaling pace, regardless of whether I'm going up, down or flat. I assume, that more important is maintaining my HR in that 120+ zone? (that ability to talk is a good simple measure)

    3) It seems to me, that your body will start burning carbs first (easiest to burn). So, given all the above info, how long of a store of carbs would I have before my body would turn to burning more fat than usual? This is really my original question in a different form.
    2005 Specialized Hardrock Sport

  10. #10
    Stegosaurus Crunkologist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Goa, India
    My Bikes
    2004 Giant OCR-3
    Posts
    1,530
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I really meant at first. I assumed you were just starting out. You don't have to be really sore. I think my point is... do as many miles as you can. Listen to your body.

    You burn fat at a pretty constant rate, I think. And as anyone that has ever tried to ride in Ketosis will tell you... that isn't enough energy for cycling. Once you run out of carbs, protein is converted to glucose... that means you're losing muscle, not fat. So carb up before you ride.

    The key here is metabolism maintenance. The more you carb up, the more you can ride, the faster your metabolism goes, the more you can eat without gaining weight, etc. I'd focus on being able to really spin some miles before I focused on cutting cals and burning fat. Your body will thank you for it. If your metabolism is high... you burn calories while sitting on the couch. That is your goal.

    In my own training, I had made the mistake of not eating enough, and to be honest I JUST started carbing up heavily the night/morning before a ride, and its made all the difference in the world in my training. I'm adding miles, and thats the best way to lose fat.
    "A conservative is a liberal who's been mugged.
    A liberal is a conservative who's been arrested."

  11. #11
    scofflaw
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    541
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Devoidarex
    I bought a mountain bike in order to get into shape. My goal is to lose 25-30 pounds.

    Assuming I can ride 4 or 5 times a week, how long should I aim to stay on the bike (at a MINIMUM) in order to see some reasonable results. I'm not expecting to lose 15 pounds a month or anything, but I would like to see a noticeable difference by September.

    I will be riding a relatively flat, packed-gravel trail, with a goal of maintaining a good cadence, rather than a particular speed.

    So, when I head out the door, how long should I expect to ride before I can return home without feeling guilty?
    Congratulations on having a goal. It's not just the riding. What are you eating?
    If Dominoes delivers 4 nights out of 7, the cycling isn't going to make a dent

  12. #12
    .
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    .
    My Bikes
    .
    Posts
    3,094
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A bike is extremely effecient - see Ivan Illich about this. However, say I ride 10 miles and at 35 calories a mile it's 350 calories. One nice iced latte will take care of that right? Especially because unless I remember to tell them not to, they always put whipped cream on top, and those jimmies. I swear, chocolate flavored jimmies! Anyway, what I find is that an hour's brisk ride is very good exercise, I feel like I really exercised when I do an hour against the wind, and it's because I did - that's a fair old ride for someone just getting back into it. Well, I find I actually want to eat less. Yep, exercise for a lot of people has a certain appatite-suppressent effect for a lot of people - look up a file on the net called "Adiposity 101" for that. And, since me no se hable "take it easy" when riding, even when done and when sleeping, my leg muscles are busy recovering and rebuilding, and building up, in response to the stimulus. This is why exercise puts you into a fat-burning mode that's higher than for a nonexerciser that's continuous.

    So: That hour's ride burns calories, makes me inclined to actually eat a bit less, and raises my resting metabolism.

    Now keep in mind, you really don't want to lose more than one lb a week. It's just not healthy to lose weight faster than that, so you need to treat exercise as a lifestyle change not a band-aid. Likewise with diet. I think in terms not of dieting but as changing habits - out went beer, except occasionally, in came sparkling water, which still feels like a treat. A while back, out went chips, since a small 99-cent bag of fritos is 700+ calories, read the label! Ouch! But I like salad and nuts and things, so those are the new munchies. Frankly I love to sit and crunch through a bag of..... salad fixings (lettuce, carrots, etc that comes in bags) from the store. Yum!

    All of this takes CONSISTANCY and TIME so it's a good thing biking is fun!

  13. #13
    Resident Silent Dissident Devoidarex's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Port Coquitlam, BC
    My Bikes
    2005 Hardrock Sport
    Posts
    33
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Marge
    Congratulations on having a goal. It's not just the riding. What are you eating?
    If Dominoes delivers 4 nights out of 7, the cycling isn't going to make a dent
    My diet is fairly "normal". I generally don't eat fast food (maybe twice a month at most). My problem food is the salty stuff, like chips. I've decided to cut those out and find healthier snacks.

    I don't think my calorie intake will be a big problem. I'm more worried about getting a good calorie burn each and every time I go out on the bike, so I'm not fooling myself into thinking I'm accomplishing something other than a scenic tour of the neighbourhood.
    2005 Specialized Hardrock Sport

  14. #14
    Stegosaurus Crunkologist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Goa, India
    My Bikes
    2004 Giant OCR-3
    Posts
    1,530
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The problem with chips isn't salt. Water retention is temporary. The problem is the horrible fats, and the carbs without fiber.

    You eat chips, but you eat healthy? Parse error.

    You'll know you're riding enough if you can go further and further each week. If last week's route is easy as hell, and you can keep going and going and going.
    "A conservative is a liberal who's been mugged.
    A liberal is a conservative who's been arrested."

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    six two six
    Posts
    53
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Devoidarex
    Thanks for the replies so far.

    Some questions...

    1) Do I really have to be sore after a ride to know that I've done good work? It seems to me that if I'm running for an hour at a medium heart-rate (to burn fat), then that shouldn't make me sore, as opposed to pedaling up a hill for an hour, where I can see how my thighs would be dead the next day.

    2) If the rate is around 35-50 calories a mile, how can I translate this into cadence? I'm not really sure of my mileage (actually, kilometerage). I attempt to maintain a steady pedaling pace, regardless of whether I'm going up, down or flat. I assume, that more important is maintaining my HR in that 120+ zone? (that ability to talk is a good simple measure)

    3) It seems to me, that your body will start burning carbs first (easiest to burn). So, given all the above info, how long of a store of carbs would I have before my body would turn to burning more fat than usual? This is really my original question in a different form.
    1) No. Play the numbers game first. If you burn 4000 calories and eat 3000 calories, you'll lose weight. It doesn't matter if the 4000 burnt calories came from playing chess or boxing Mike Tyson.

    2) buy a HR monitor. They're cheap. really. www.nashbar.com

    3) Your body utilizes all three macronutrients (protein, carbohydrates, fat) for energy for all activities at all times in varying ratios. In fact, you burn the most fat, as a percentage of your calorie utilization, when you SLEEP. However, your total calorie utilization when you sleep is so low that it's not particularly signifacant. This goes back to the numbers game. Just burn the calories first. Worry about where the calories come from when you get under 12% bf.

  16. #16
    Resident Silent Dissident Devoidarex's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Port Coquitlam, BC
    My Bikes
    2005 Hardrock Sport
    Posts
    33
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Crunkologist
    The problem with chips isn't salt. Water retention is temporary. The problem is the horrible fats, and the carbs without fiber.

    You eat chips, but you eat healthy? Parse error.

    You'll know you're riding enough if you can go further and further each week. If last week's route is easy as hell, and you can keep going and going and going.
    I never said I eat "healthy", I said I eat a fairly "normal" diet. I'm more than aware of the nutritional value of foods. I generally eat good foods, but like most people, I have a couple of "problem" foods. My point was that, unlike many who enjoy "sweets", I enjoy salty snacks, and chips fit the bill. The salt isn't why I'm cutting them out, but rather the ridiculous fat content.

    Like I said, my calorie intake isn't my concern. I know how to eat well. My problem has been the fact that I went from an uber-active person to a generally sedentary person. As a result of that, the fact that I quit smoking 8 months ago and my hitting my 30's, I've put on a bunch of weight - all of it on my stomach.

    What I'm trying to figure out is how to maximize the benefit of cycling without becoming obsessed with going that extra mile. I don't mind working hard to lose the weight, but I'm also willing to be patient. I don't want to kill myself on my bike each day. I just want to go out, ride, and come home knowing that I've realized a physical benefit for the time spent.
    2005 Specialized Hardrock Sport

  17. #17
    Resident Silent Dissident Devoidarex's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Port Coquitlam, BC
    My Bikes
    2005 Hardrock Sport
    Posts
    33
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dodgy
    1) No. Play the numbers game first. If you burn 4000 calories and eat 3000 calories, you'll lose weight. It doesn't matter if the 4000 burnt calories came from playing chess or boxing Mike Tyson.

    2) buy a HR monitor. They're cheap. really. www.nashbar.com

    3) Your body utilizes all three macronutrients (protein, carbohydrates, fat) for energy for all activities at all times in varying ratios. In fact, you burn the most fat, as a percentage of your calorie utilization, when you SLEEP. However, your total calorie utilization when you sleep is so low that it's not particularly signifacant. This goes back to the numbers game. Just burn the calories first. Worry about where the calories come from when you get under 12% bf.
    OK then. Let me ask you this - assuming I am riding and my HR is in the aerobic target zone. How long would you recommend I stay in this zone? Maybe more realistically, how long would you say is the MINIMUM amount of time I should stay there before I am wasting my time?
    2005 Specialized Hardrock Sport

  18. #18
    Stegosaurus Crunkologist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Goa, India
    My Bikes
    2004 Giant OCR-3
    Posts
    1,530
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Then I reiterate: scrap all the high tech. Ride as far as you can, then turn back. You'll know when its too far. You'll get real tired.

    Repeat this. You'll notice that you're making progress... you can go farther and farther.

    Keep that up till you can ride 50+ miles several times a week.

    Wow, you lost the weight.

    Its that simple. Save the money on gadgets, don't overanalyze, and have FUN with it.
    "A conservative is a liberal who's been mugged.
    A liberal is a conservative who's been arrested."

  19. #19
    Resident Silent Dissident Devoidarex's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Port Coquitlam, BC
    My Bikes
    2005 Hardrock Sport
    Posts
    33
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Crunkologist
    Then I reiterate: scrap all the high tech. Ride as far as you can, then turn back. You'll know when its too far. You'll get real tired.

    Repeat this. You'll notice that you're making progress... you can go farther and farther.

    Keep that up till you can ride 50+ miles several times a week.

    Wow, you lost the weight.

    Its that simple. Save the money on gadgets, don't overanalyze, and have FUN with it.
    If I was a lotto winner, and had 24 hours a day to do as I please, this would be a great plan. However, my free time is limited, which is why I asked the original question.

    Perhaps on my days off, I can ride and ride and ride. However, during work days, this isn't an option. This is why I'm trying to get a ballpark answer as to how long I should expect to put into a ride (or keep my HR in the target zone) in order to get a decent benefit from it.

    If the answer is, say, an hour, then I can aim for that. If my HR is too low, I can always ride faster. Unfortunately, riding longer isn't necessarily an option for me.
    2005 Specialized Hardrock Sport

  20. #20
    Stegosaurus Crunkologist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Goa, India
    My Bikes
    2004 Giant OCR-3
    Posts
    1,530
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Buddy... noone says you have unlimited time. Ride as much as you CAN, is the point.

    Don't overcomplicate this. You'll get to know your body soon enough, and you'll note your progress, and so you'll know how much is enough.

    If you've got 20 minutes to ride, then SPRINT baby SPRINT. The point is: ride till you're tired as hell.
    "A conservative is a liberal who's been mugged.
    A liberal is a conservative who's been arrested."

  21. #21
    Kelly Drive Amateur Boogs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    South Philly
    My Bikes
    '86 Super Sport with mods
    Posts
    465
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Devoidarex

    Perhaps on my days off, I can ride and ride and ride. However, during work days, this isn't an option. This is why I'm trying to get a ballpark answer as to how long I should expect to put into a ride (or keep my HR in the target zone) in order to get a decent benefit from it.
    At the bottom of THIS page (on Bicycling Magazine's website), there is a calculator where you can input your time, intensity of ride, and body weight in order to get an approximate number of calories burned... very helpful. Try putting in data for an hour ride at the intensity you fell comfortable with, and see if that's acceptable for you, remembering that a pound of fat = 3600 calories.

    After you know the numbers, it's just up to your goals, and the lifestyle that this cycling is a part of.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Peterson Iowa
    My Bikes
    Trek 7000 and a Trek 1200
    Posts
    765
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Let me offer my expeirence as it was only a year ago, I was 52 when I started riding again after a 15 year lay off so I did not have to go through the learning phase. I weighed 200 lbs and rode about 1 hour 3 times a week until I got into a little better shape and then rode 4 times a week with a 2-2 and 1/2 hour ride on the weekend. I lost 40 lbs in about 4.5 months, I rode a good pace so as not to waste my time(HRM would be nice). Read any info you can as knowledge is most helpful and I wish you all the luck in the world. I have kept the weight off and ride about 100 miles a week now(6ft and 157 lbs), I feel a whole lot better than I did before.

  23. #23
    Name's Ash ...housewares Doctor Morbius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    The adult video section
    My Bikes
    Too many to list
    Posts
    798
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Devoidarex
    Thanks for the replies so far.

    Some questions...

    1) Do I really have to be sore after a ride to know that I've done good work? It seems to me that if I'm running for an hour at a medium heart-rate (to burn fat), then that shouldn't make me sore, as opposed to pedaling up a hill for an hour, where I can see how my thighs would be dead the next day.

    2) If the rate is around 35-50 calories a mile, how can I translate this into cadence? I'm not really sure of my mileage (actually, kilometerage). I attempt to maintain a steady pedaling pace, regardless of whether I'm going up, down or flat. I assume, that more important is maintaining my HR in that 120+ zone? (that ability to talk is a good simple measure)

    3) It seems to me, that your body will start burning carbs first (easiest to burn). So, given all the above info, how long of a store of carbs would I have before my body would turn to burning more fat than usual? This is really my original question in a different form.
    1)No. In fact you don't really want to be sore as you will want to ride again in 24 hours and be recovered in order to do so. Cycling isn't bodybuilding so forget about the pump and the burn.

    2) Calories per mile doesn't translate into cadence. And although others will disagree, I think it is better to exercise by time than miles. Time and intensity. Get the gadgets. A heart rate monitor and an inexpensive cycleometer. The secret is to keep your HR under a certain percentage!! Sounds strange I know but most new cyclists will find they are usually pushing harder than they should.

    3) You don't want to deplete your body's store of carbs while exercising (or anytime else for that matter). That's called "the bonk" and it will not help you lose weight or get fit. In fact it is important that you avoid "the bonk" by taking in some carbs before, during and after exercise. The post workout meal is probably the most important meal of the day as the influx of carbs will help prevent your immune system from taking a dive.

    Don't go hungry and drink considerably more water than you think you need ... considerably more! Also, you may find that you aren't losing weight as rapidly as you had hoped. Don't fear as you are probably building up some muscle and losing bodyfat so don't rely on the scales completely. I would think an hour a day would be plenty for a fitness/weight loss program.
    I did not achieve this position in life by having some snot-nosed punk leave my cheese out in the wind. - Ed Rooney


    It's not that I'm lazy. I'm just highly motivated to RELAX!!

  24. #24
    Stegosaurus Crunkologist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Goa, India
    My Bikes
    2004 Giant OCR-3
    Posts
    1,530
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Boogs
    At the bottom of THIS page (on Bicycling Magazine's website), there is a calculator where you can input your time, intensity of ride, and body weight in order to get an approximate number of calories burned... very helpful. Try putting in data for an hour ride at the intensity you fell comfortable with, and see if that's acceptable for you, remembering that a pound of fat = 3600 calories.

    After you know the numbers, it's just up to your goals, and the lifestyle that this cycling is a part of.
    OH MY GOD...

    I burn between 2 and 3000 calories on my long rides twice a week. Thats a pound of fat. Nevermind all the other stuff I do like walk and swim, and nevermind that I eat only "health" food in a caloric deficit anyway. Holy crap. No wonder the weight seems to be melting off. Loose skin, HERE I COME. Actually, my weight varies so much, this happens now no matter what. But just damn.
    "A conservative is a liberal who's been mugged.
    A liberal is a conservative who's been arrested."

  25. #25
    Stegosaurus Crunkologist's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Goa, India
    My Bikes
    2004 Giant OCR-3
    Posts
    1,530
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Actually, if you are carbing up for rides, and drinking alot of water...

    then I recommond abandoning the scale. You KNOW you're losing fat if you're exercising regularly and aren't eating a caloric excess (more than you were). I haven't weighed in months. But I've lost about 4 inches on my waist in two months... my belt keeps tightening. The old pants fit. These measurements don't lie. The scale is pathological. It wil just confuse you, encourage your to dehydrate/underfeed for rides, etc.

    The scale is your enemy. You are after lost inches and increased performance, not pounds. I.e. body composition change, not weight loss.

    And as to soreness... everyone I know who started cycling got sore occasionally for the first month or so. Its just not possible to avoid a hill once in a while that pushes you a bit much, in most areas.

    Although for me, after about two months of training... soreness has become something else. Like I can feel my quads adapting to the load after a long ride... but they don't quite hurt, if that makes sense.
    "A conservative is a liberal who's been mugged.
    A liberal is a conservative who's been arrested."

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •