Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Cycling-running

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    32
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Cycling-running

    I don't know if there are any runners here, but here is my question.

    How much cycling would you need to ride to equal running a marathon? ie.. distance and elevation gain...

  2. #2
    File Not Found Pampusik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    My Bikes
    two two-wheeled types
    Posts
    135
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    It differs due to the mechanical nature of your bicycle. The human body is only built to run up to 20 miles. The final 6.2 miles is what makes a marathon truly great.

    So, to equal a marathon, I suggest you ride until your body hits "a wall" and add 25%-30% of the distance you just rode.

  3. #3
    Loves Pandas!
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    O-RE-GON
    My Bikes
    2005 Specialized Rockhopper
    Posts
    24
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    you can cycle about five times longer than you can run so say one hundred and twenty miles or so. The reason for this I believe is the reduced impact that cycling has on your legs.

  4. #4
    Name's Ash ...housewares Doctor Morbius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    The adult video section
    My Bikes
    Too many to list
    Posts
    798
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by apmech
    I don't know if there are any runners here, but here is my question.

    How much cycling would you need to ride to equal running a marathon? ie.. distance and elevation gain...
    Here you go...

    http://www.trainright.com/page.asp?p...leID=2#article

    Most people just do a 3 to 1 conversion but that doesn't reflect wind resistance.
    I did not achieve this position in life by having some snot-nosed punk leave my cheese out in the wind. - Ed Rooney


    It's not that I'm lazy. I'm just highly motivated to RELAX!!

  5. #5
    Just ride. roadbuzz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Location
    C-ville, Va
    Posts
    3,235
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I've never run a marathon, so I can't compare from my own experience. Given that comparing cycling to running is an apples-oranges comparison, there are still some parallels. I think a century roughly corresponds to a marathon. In my experience, the "wall" effect hits around mile 65 or 70. If you're in decent shape, have decent endurance, and have done some distance so your body is used to using fat as fuel, you don't experience it.

    Other runners will probably disagree, and I'm not much of a runner any more in any case, but I always felt like 7 miles on the bike corresponded to 1 mile running. (disclaimer: at *my* running and cycling speeds). Or, an equivalent workout on the bike takes about twice as long. That in no way agrees with Dr. Burke's article. That's based mainly on perceived exertion and how I feel after, say a 1/2 hour, 3.5 mile run vs. 1 hour, 20 mile ride.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I agree - no real comparison. However, the Ironman folks have done it for you. The event is designed to provide relatively similar experiences in the swim/bike/run portions: 2.4 mile swim, 112 mile bike, marathon run.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    New Jersey
    My Bikes
    Trek 7200FX
    Posts
    7
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I don't necessarily agree that the body was only made to run 20 miles - but I think you are partially correct. After around 20 miles, the glycogen stored in the muscles is depleted and runners hit what they call "the wall". If, however, you replenish the glycogen as it is depleated, the human body can run until it's fat stores or exaustion sets in. Pam Grier just ran 300 miles without stopping - the longest anyone has ever run without stopping, and she did it by eating and drinking on the run.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •