Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-19-05, 12:27 PM   #1
funbun
Doomsled
Thread Starter
 
funbun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Tuscaloosa, AL
Bikes: Trek 800
Posts: 661
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Supplementing

I have a question for you athletes. Do you use multi viatmin supplements? I was wondering what you guys thought about the whole dietary supplement thing.
funbun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-05, 02:29 PM   #2
'nother
semifreddo amartuerer
 
'nother's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Northern CA
Bikes: several
Posts: 4,599
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Assuming I can be considered an "athlete": I take a multivitamin (Centrum). I am mildly skeptical that there is any great benefit. But I'm also skeptical that there's any great harm, so my thoughts are that it's okay for me. YMMV.
'nother is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-05, 02:35 PM   #3
funbun
Doomsled
Thread Starter
 
funbun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Tuscaloosa, AL
Bikes: Trek 800
Posts: 661
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yeah, you don't have to be Lance. Just someone who rides regularly for exercise.
funbun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-05, 12:09 AM   #4
harlot
deep fried goodness
 
harlot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: emerald city
Bikes: rosemary (bstone); fat chance; serotta
Posts: 310
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've had some amazing experience boosting my B vitamins, calcium and magnesium. After crunching numbers I was amazed at how deficient I was and it explained a lot of my fatigue, sleeplessness, and yes - moodiness. A multivitamin is not a magic pill that will give you everything in its proper amount, and eating "healthy" usually will not either. The food we eat now is highly deficient in the vitamins we evolved to require for optimum health (cows and chickens are not supposed to eat pellets or other animals, and veggies are not supposed to be covered in pesticides). Humans are not supposed to exist on white flour and sugar either. Add in physical, environmental, and job related stresses and we're even more in the nutritional hole. When our bodies aren't getting what they need to function, the most subtle things go out of whack.

There are several books out there that can guide you towards what you should be getting, but you should also see a nutritionist to make sure you are balanced and don't overdose on too much of a "good thing".
harlot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-05, 12:33 AM   #5
Roody
Sophomoric Member
 
Roody's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Dancing in Lansing
Bikes:
Posts: 23,587
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 177 Post(s)
You can go to fitday.com and enter in all the food you eat for a week or two. Then you can get a report that tells you a daily average of the nutrients you take in, and what you are short on. For example, I discovered that I did real well except for slight shortages in vitimins A, D, E, and K; also the minerals magnesium and zinc. I figured I'm really getting enough vitamin D (the sunshine vitamin) because I'm outdoors so much. Then I found out which foods supplied the other missing nutrients and started eating more of them.

Problem solved without supplements.
Roody is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-05, 09:12 AM   #6
harlot
deep fried goodness
 
harlot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: emerald city
Bikes: rosemary (bstone); fat chance; serotta
Posts: 310
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I totally agree that you should try to get your nutrients from real food and FitDay is a good source to start tracking that. I should have qualified that I have several food allergies and a disease that makes me susceptible to fatigue, so using supplements when I can't get them from my diet is good for me. I don't want to rely on pills my whole life, but until I can find a way to fit my requirements into my limited diet, they are good. People who do not have the time or resources (travel, job, etc) to get their nutrient requirements on a daily basis may also benefit.

Note to all: they are called supplements, not replacements.

Last edited by harlot; 07-20-05 at 11:50 AM.
harlot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-05, 11:51 AM   #7
harlot
deep fried goodness
 
harlot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: emerald city
Bikes: rosemary (bstone); fat chance; serotta
Posts: 310
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
One more thing and then I'll shut up. You should not base your nutritional intake solely on the RDA, which can grossly underestimate how much of a nutrient you need. Ex. the RDA recommends only half of the calcium that I should get and 1/3 of the B vitamins. Each individual has particular needs, esp during times of illness or stress. See a health care professional for your particular needs.
harlot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-05, 12:55 PM   #8
biodiesel
Senior Member
 
biodiesel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 543
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Food Allergies...?

Celiac?
sounds familliar.
biodiesel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-05, 01:39 PM   #9
harlot
deep fried goodness
 
harlot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: emerald city
Bikes: rosemary (bstone); fat chance; serotta
Posts: 310
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Dairy and wheat allergies, but luckily not full celiac. Then I can't do soy because of my Hashimotos thyroiditis. Soy isn't the cute innocent bean everyone makes it out to be.
harlot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-05, 01:53 PM   #10
alison_in_oh
Focus on the future
 
alison_in_oh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 718
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by harlot
Then I can't do soy because of my Hashimotos thyroiditis. Soy isn't the cute innocent bean everyone makes it out to be.
Why pick on soy, it's not the only goitrogenic food. ???
alison_in_oh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-20-05, 02:41 PM   #11
harlot
deep fried goodness
 
harlot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: emerald city
Bikes: rosemary (bstone); fat chance; serotta
Posts: 310
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Because soy is shoved down everyone's throat as being the perfect food: protein, vegetarian, dairy substitute, multi-textural, skin cream, etc. And it's been scientifically proven again and again to negatively effect the thyroid and hormones in general, but american marketing ignores science in favor of getting people on their money-making bandwagon.
harlot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-05, 06:46 AM   #12
burtonbiker
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Tyler,TX
Bikes: Spec Allez Sport '04
Posts: 104
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by harlot
I've had some amazing experience boosting my B vitamins, calcium and magnesium. After crunching numbers I was amazed at how deficient I was and it explained a lot of my fatigue, sleeplessness, and yes - moodiness. A multivitamin is not a magic pill that will give you everything in its proper amount, and eating "healthy" usually will not either. The food we eat now is highly deficient in the vitamins we evolved to require for optimum health (cows and chickens are not supposed to eat pellets or other animals, and veggies are not supposed to be covered in pesticides). Humans are not supposed to exist on white flour and sugar either. Add in physical, environmental, and job related stresses and we're even more in the nutritional hole. When our bodies aren't getting what they need to function, the most subtle things go out of whack.

There are several books out there that can guide you towards what you should be getting, but you should also see a nutritionist to make sure you are balanced and don't overdose on too much of a "good thing".
Always wondered if all these things are wrong how do you scientifically (not one person, please) explain that life expectancies have almost doubled in the last 100 years... anyone want to tackle that??
burtonbiker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-05, 06:58 AM   #13
funbun
Doomsled
Thread Starter
 
funbun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Tuscaloosa, AL
Bikes: Trek 800
Posts: 661
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Look at the avaerage age people die. For instance, if death certificates of 1900 say that most people were dying at 35, and you compared those to 2000 and most people were dying at 75 then it's safe to say life expectancy has doubled.
funbun is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:11 PM.