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  1. #1
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    100 mile event training

    Hi all, OK am a newbie here, and this is my first post. I am a bit of a novice cyclist, I have been asked to do the Manchester 100 (miles), and started training for it a couple of weeks ago. The event is at the beginning of September. So far I have managed about 20 miles going out on the bike, I do this at the weekend. During the week I go to the gym three times, run for about three miles, and cycle for about 12 each time. The bike training I push as hard as I can, and I have done 10 miles in 20 minutes before.. I hope to increase this to 5 miles running and 20 miles bike, nearer to the event. I eat well, don't smoke and don't drink alcohol in the week. How do you think I will get on - should I incorporate anything else into my training regime, or should I just keep on going the way I am doing it now? My safety net is that I can also do a shortened version on the day - 50 miles - I figure if I'm not confident with my fitness level I can do this instead.

    Thanks in advance,
    Will

  2. #2
    Senior Member va_cyclist's Avatar
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    If it were me, I would cut back on the gymwork and running, and spend more time cycling. You should be able to comfortably do 60-70 miles before you take on a 100-mile ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by va_cyclist
    If it were me, I would cut back on the gymwork and running, and spend more time cycling. You should be able to comfortably do 60-70 miles before you take on a 100-mile ride.
    Although I have not done this in years and can't do it now, I agree 100%. You need to increase your riding distance every day. If you jump from say 35 miles by yourself to 100 mile organized event it would be very easy to burn out at about mile 70. That said I would strive for a 35 miler by this coming Saturday, and increase that by at least 10 miles every saturday before the event. Rest on Sundays and don't ride more than 5-10 miles per day the week of the event. Ride the day before the event, just to keep your self loose.

  4. #4
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    To go from 20 miles to 100 miles in a month's time is usually an unrealistic goal. The general rule of thumb in training is to increase your weekly mileage by no more than 10% per week. Progressing faster than that risks injury to the knee or tendons from overuse. Doing a century ride without adequate endurance training will likely cause you to bonk before the finish as you will likely not pace yourself properly or eat sufficiently to conserve your glycogen stores.

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    Pat
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    This month's bicycling magazine has a couple of suggested training schedules for preparing for a century. I think these are for 10 weeks of training and they assume you can ride nearly every day.

    You do not have to ride every day. But you should get aerobic exercise 5-6 days per week in training for a century. Also, you should put in at least 2 pretty long rides each week for a number of weeks before trying a century.

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    I am training for repeated centuries/day. Here is what I learned. Hope it helps:

    1) Running, jogging and walking developed different muscles and affected joints differently from biking. (I can feel that)
    2) Food intake is a crucial issue for centuries but not as critical for short runs up to 50 miles. (I am not skinny!) Water consumption is crucial.
    3) You go 30 MPH. That would burn me out.
    4) I can do 50 miles in 3 hours back to back provided two food stops of 2-3 minutes. Without that, as supcom says, I would probably bonk out. I will not try a 100 mile race without stops. I have been doing this for a number of years.

  7. #7
    Senior Member edp773's Avatar
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    Someone posted this training link on a previous thread. This is a 12 week training routine by Joe Friel. Find the level of tour that matches your Manchester 100 the best, and then find the program that matches you the best. Good luck, you have set a high goal.

    http://www.experienceplus.com/readin...es/000320.html

    Thanks to the original poster of this link.

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    I will probably stick to doing the 50, as so many of you have suggested that a 100 is an unrealistic target based on the amount of time I have to train (just under 5 weeks). I think I will do the 50 this year, which I will still need to train for, and build up to the 100 for next year. I just don't want to whimp out and walk away from such a challenge...

    My wife has told me I would be nuts to do the 100, as have a few mates who cycle regularly. I guess the replies to my thread have confirmed what they say.

    Thanks for the advice,
    Will

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    Ok, so I took on board what everyone said, thanks for the advice. I went to the gym tuesday, got on the bike and did 20 miles in 40 minutes. Today I plan to do 30, and get 35 in at the weekend. If I increase this every weekend by 10 miles, I will get to 65 miles three days before the event with a week in hand.

    I am not really out on my bike that much, I mainly am training in the gym. I push the intensity to level 3, on the bike at the gym, and I wondered if there are any hard and fast rules about this type of training? Is there an acceptable resistance when training on a bike at the gym?

    I have a Trek mountain bike, not modified or nuffink - will this be a problem?

    I eat pretty well, take in a lot of fruit and veg every day, drink plenty of water, and I dont smoke. I don't drink alcohol during the week. I take vitamin supps every day, and although I work shifts I get a regular sleep pattern.

    Bearing this in mind, what are my chances?????????

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    Senior Member va_cyclist's Avatar
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    I think you missed the point. Get off the stationary bike, and get out on the road. Stationary trainers aren't a substitute for roadwork. 20 miles in 40 minutes? That's a 30 mph average. Good luck doing that in the real world. Your stationary bike is lying to you. Sorry if this seems harsh, but you're training for a 100-mile ride on real roads, and you're doing everything but what you should be doing, which is riding a bike.

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    Given the time you have to train and what you are doing I would recommend going for the 50 miler this year and leave the big one as your goal for next year. I started doing 100km/63 mile rides last year (frequently called metrics) and the first one nearly did me in. I trained for 6 weeks starting from a base of being able to do about 40 kms and used the advice of only training to 75kms. I paid for it on race day as my back was killing me around the 85 to 90 km mark. I did the same race this year and finished more than half an hour faster and in far better condition. Sometimes what needs conditioning is not just your legs or your cardio capacity. If you can do 50 miles before the race you will be all set, but there is a big difference between 50 and 100.

    Good luck either way.
    He's not the messiah, he's a very naughty boy!

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    OK VA, fair play to ya. I appreciate the reality check. I need to get realistic about this - I need more time. I have worked out a route to work that will at least get me out on the bike more, but I still think that I should do the 50. I might look at joining a cycling club also, will be searching the forum for advice...

    Thanks again
    Will (embarrased newb)


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    Quote Originally Posted by va_cyclist
    I think you missed the point. Get off the stationary bike, and get out on the road. Stationary trainers aren't a substitute for roadwork. 20 miles in 40 minutes? That's a 30 mph average. Good luck doing that in the real world. Your stationary bike is lying to you. Sorry if this seems harsh, but you're training for a 100-mile ride on real roads, and you're doing everything but what you should be doing, which is riding a bike.
    va_cyclist:
    I am interested why you think that training on a "Stationary Trainer is no substitute for roadwork"?
    I live in the Midwest with many months not suitable for roadwork. So I depend on my stationary trainer to keep fit. I cannot sustain 30 MPH on my trainer but I can hold 20 MPH for several hours at over 700 calories/hour and 95 RPM cadence.
    In my non scientific opinion, this workout seems comparable with a 20 mile/hour run on a circular park road with a few 3-4% hills.
    I realize that I do not get the balancing, gear shifting and wind conditions.
    But strictly cardio vascular and muscle development should be OK, don't you agree?
    This is not an idle question for me. I am training for a big trip, next spring.

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    Quote Originally Posted by will dehne
    va_cyclist:
    I am interested why you think that training on a "Stationary Trainer is no substitute for roadwork"?
    I live in the Midwest with many months not suitable for roadwork. So I depend on my stationary trainer to keep fit. I cannot sustain 30 MPH on my trainer but I can hold 20 MPH for several hours at over 700 calories/hour and 95 RPM cadence.
    In my non scientific opinion, this workout seems comparable with a 20 mile/hour run on a circular park road with a few 3-4% hills.
    I realize that I do not get the balancing, gear shifting and wind conditions.
    But strictly cardio vascular and muscle development should be OK, don't you agree?
    This is not an idle question for me. I am training for a big trip, next spring.
    I'm not va_cyclist, but I agree that stationary trainers are no comparison to real world cycling. "Exercise bikes" (Life Cycle, etc.) are the absolute worst. A road bicycle on a trainer is somewhat better but still no comparison to being outside. Both are good for building up your cardio, but are deceptive for how well you'll do on the road. Also, I think since indoor cycling protects you from the vibrations and variations of the road, your underdevelop some of the stabilizing muscles you need on the road.

    Inside, you have a nice, temperature controlled environment--this alone should improve your spped and "miles." Also, as you noted, you don't have to deal with wind, bugs, people, cars, etc. Third, the "hills" you encounter inside are no comparison to the real thing.

    I love spin/studio cycling and go to 3-5 classes per week. While those classes do improve my cardio and therefore, probably, my cycling, they do not come close to substituting for road miles. My cycling would improve even more if I replaced spin with more road time, but I'd miss out on the cute soccer moms at the club....

    BR

  15. #15
    Because I thought I could ks1g's Avatar
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    2 more suggestions:

    1. Do some of your training rides on terrain similar to the planned ride. E.g., if it has hills, don't do all your riding on flat terrain. (learned the hard way prepping for my first metric century in '03.)

    2. If your Trek MTB still has the 2" all-terrain knobbies, get some 26x1.25" road slicks (high pressure skinny tires) and start riding on those. The difference will be huge and your legs will thank you immediately. You'll still be lugging around the extra weight of an MTB, and (depending on the model) the weight and energy-absorbing shocks, but it is less of an issue on a shorter ride than a full century. I rode that metric on a hardtail MTB with road slicks; I really appreciated having the granny gear on the hills and while I was probably the 2nd slowest rider that day, I finished. You may want to adjust seating position and get some bar ends for additional hand positions to make it more comfortable for a day on pavement.

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    Went out on the bike on Tuesday, did approx 30 miles in about 3 hrs. Got lost a couple of times, did a couple of scary hills as a result, but at this stage that's what it's all about.

    Intend to do this again, I know the route, hope to improve mileage to 35 - 40 miles in the same time.

    My recovery time is for about three days, will be attempting this at weekend. The route is an 18 mile trip, pretty flat, will be doing 2 circuits. Like previous posts have mentioned, getting out on the bike at this stage is what its all about.

    Decided the bike at the gym is lying to me, and am definitely better off for realising this.

    Will be doing the 100, but not treating it as a race. Just to finish is my target!

  17. #17
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    willoughby, take a look at the article in the link ... I think it might help you.

    http://www.machka.net/century.htm

  18. #18
    Long Distance Cyclist Machka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by will dehne
    va_cyclist:
    I am interested why you think that training on a "Stationary Trainer is no substitute for roadwork"?
    I live in the Midwest with many months not suitable for roadwork. So I depend on my stationary trainer to keep fit. I cannot sustain 30 MPH on my trainer but I can hold 20 MPH for several hours at over 700 calories/hour and 95 RPM cadence.
    In my non scientific opinion, this workout seems comparable with a 20 mile/hour run on a circular park road with a few 3-4% hills.
    I realize that I do not get the balancing, gear shifting and wind conditions.
    But strictly cardio vascular and muscle development should be OK, don't you agree?
    This is not an idle question for me. I am training for a big trip, next spring.
    The stationary trainer can help you maintain a certain fitness level, which can be helpful during the "off-season" throughout the winter, but like you say ... you don't get the balancing, gear shifting, and wind conditions. You also don't get all the other weather conditions or the hills. If you are planning a big trip, it is a good idea to experience as much outdoors as possible.

    Also if you use a stationary bicycle at the gym rather than a real bicycle on a trainer, you work different muscles.

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    Thanx for the advice, Machka, that really helps. I totally agree with the first paragraph - anyone with a reasonably level of fitness and a lot of determination can take on a century, a lot of people have told me this. What does concern me is the training paragraph - I was aiming to do about 55-60 miles as my target distance before the race - not 70. A more experienced cyclist told me this is adequate training for the event - what do you think?

    Sorry to keep asking questions, I want to know if I should alter my training program, like I said I feel pretty confident, which I suppose is half the battle...

    Thanks in advance,
    Will

    PS Visited Lake Louise for my honeymoon this year, one of the most beautiful places in the world..

  20. #20
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    If you can do 60 comfortably, you can do 100. The final 10-15 might be a push, but if you will suck it up and ride through it, you will be fine.

    BR

  21. #21
    semifreddo amartuerer 'nother's Avatar
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    I think you can probably do it, particularly if you're generally fit as you suggest. However I'd definitely look at spending more time in the saddle between now and then. Prior to my first century ride, my longest had been something like 55 miles. What I remember being surprised about was that it wasn't too bad keeping up the pedaling over the 100 miles . . . but being in the saddle. By mile 80 or so, every tiny bump felt like someone was hitting my ass with a ball-peen hammer. I think I was out of the saddle for the last 5 miles. So, try to ride a lot, even if you can't fit in a long test ride between now and then. It will help toughen up the tissues "down there" and will make your trip more comfortable.

    Good luck!

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    after my last cycle, my ass was screaming.. you're right, more time in the saddle, less pain... thanks for the tip. My confidence level has increased after the last two posts, thanks again!

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