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Old 08-05-05, 06:53 PM   #1
my58vw
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The 10% Rule...

Lets have a discussion...

In the cycling world as most of you know we have what is known as the "10% rule"...

Any cyclist who is trying to increase milage should increase it by intervals on no more than 10% per week, and my addition with a week of reduced milage every 4th week.

Ok I find that something is quite interesting here...

I am starting to plan my base training this year. I have the following periods...

3 Weeks of Transistion
September - December (4 months) base
January - Build 1
February Build 2

Etc...

I am starting transistion at 40 mile rides, increasing milage by 10% (44 week 2 and 50 week 3) during transistion. Starting in base my long solo ride will start at 60 miles hopefully increasing to 100 miles by December. I currently have no issues with metric centuries (62 miles) twice per week so that is not an issue.

That means that I will be doing

Base 1 - 60 miles, 66 miles, 72 miles, recovery week
Base 2 - 65 miles, 72 miles, 80 miles, recovery week
Base 3 - 70 miles, 78 miles, 85 miles, recovery week
Base 4 - 80 miles, 90 miles, 100 miles, recovery week
(Loosely based on Friels training bible)

Now I have full abilities to ride centuries no problems but I want to be able to do them regulary.

Now Friel Says that your longest training ride should be at least as long as your longest race of the season (45 mile road race right now).

Now here is the question...

While the 10% rule is fully valid in order to make the 10% gain do you have to...

Do the target distace more than once per week?
or Do the target distance more than once per week?
or what is the minimum percentage of the long ride that would be good for a normal "base" day?
(i.e. 75% or 60 say, about 45 miles)

Maybe helping would be to say I plan on dedicated base rides on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, Wednesday morning being the "long" ride of the week. The other days are off, recovery or gym time.

Also is it bad to go significantly over the 10% rule (say I am at 65 and I do 80 miles?)

BTW base also implies Zone 2, which is 82- 90 percent of Lactic acid threshold HR.


I been wanting to discuss this for sometime so lets discuss!
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Old 08-05-05, 07:19 PM   #2
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I dunno... I have a wife and a job.
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Old 08-05-05, 07:48 PM   #3
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Ya I go to school full time and work full time too...
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Old 08-05-05, 08:21 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by my58vw
I been wanting to discuss this for sometime so lets discuss!

No offense meant or implied my58--, but you must have lots of spare time!

I say forget the logic - just Ride!!!!!!!!
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Old 08-05-05, 08:33 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Red Baron
No offense meant or implied my58--, but you must have lots of spare time!

I say forget the logic - just Ride!!!!!!!!
Sitting at work doing nothing as usual... BTW I have maybe 3 - 4 hours to train on my non long day and Pretty much all morning (until 4 pm) on Wednesday my long ride day. I usually get in a 40 - 50 mile ride on the not so long days right now.
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Old 08-05-05, 09:17 PM   #6
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I can feel My58vw honestly:

I get up to go to school at 9 a.m., by 2:30 p.m. I'm at work (commute which I force the 10 mile marker on) then I ride home (another 10 miles) - I normally change and hit the road by 12:30-1 a.m.is for running time (aka my time until around 3 a.m.

I grab a bowl of Kashi, and crash until 8 a.m. - if I feel sluggish, I do the fast commute home (8 miles), which gets me to bed by 2 a.m. instead of 3 a.m.

My daily mileage comes in at 20 miles riding, 13-15 miles running on my 'short' days.

On my two days off, Wednesday and Sunday - I either ride 45 miles or I run 36 (every other week).

My weekly riding mileage: 100-120 miles
My weekly running mileage: 80-100 miles

And oddly enough, I'm married and have a son too.

btw, my58vw, I never told you my interesting story, you'll appreciate this:

I was 17, had 2 months until I was to leave for the U.S. Navy, already graduated ahead of my class and had a lot of time on my hands.

One night, when I was sitting at a night club that you should be familiar with in Riverside , I got the idea to walk home, to Chino.

<---Thinks we grew up in the same region
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Old 08-05-05, 09:25 PM   #7
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You certainly get an "A" for effort but you are trying way too hard. Just ride and enjoy. The more you enjoy the more you will ride. I have steadily increased my base miles over the years and months and can comfortably do centuries, brevets etc.. and enjoy every minute and surprisingly never written a damn thing down or did anything intentionally.

But I can tell you the minute cycling / training looks, feels, taste or smells like work I am sitting my arse on the couch.
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Old 08-09-05, 06:50 PM   #8
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I think you have a nice plan there. Personally I would have a hard time trying to map out each ride. I like to have the freedom to change things up a bit on the day. When I'm getting worked up for a larger ride like a metric I do a similar pattern with each weekend ride being about 10k's / 6 miles longer than the last weekend's ride. This gets adjusted some based on the difficulty of the ride too. I try to be able to go ride a 70k/45 mile ride on any given weekend so the workup to a metric at 100k's/63 miles isn't too bad. I do a long ride on weekends, commute when possible during the week, and make up for missed commutes with a night mountain bike ride or two midweek. Of course, I'm not on a team, either.

In short, I approve of your scheme. If it works for you, go for it!
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Old 08-09-05, 07:07 PM   #9
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sorry if this is off topic, but can you help me out and explain recovery week? or what is recovery?
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Old 08-09-05, 07:09 PM   #10
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That 10% rule is for NEW riders. Once you've built up a pretty good base, you can start increasing distances and intensities at a much quicker rate.

For example ...

Someone who has not sat on a bicycle for years might do a 5 mile ride. That person would likely be pretty tired out by the end of the ride. His next ride, a day or two later, should probably be 4 or 5 miles again, and again, until he feels more comfortable with that distance ... and then he can increase the distance by 10% and ride 5.5 miles. And if he feels good after a couple rides at that distance, he might consider upping it to just over 6 miles ... etc. All the while, he should not forget to take some days off, and that there will be some shorter days in there as well, so that he can recover.

However, if a person is quite comfortable doing 20 to 30 miles per day during the week, and alternating between metric centuries or centuries on the weekends, that person could make the decision to start Randonneuring ... doing ultra-distances ... and would probably be fine making the leap from a 200K brevet (125 miles) one week, to a 300K brevet (180 miles) a couple weeks later, etc.


Trust me on this ... when I'm building up to my longer brevets and randonnees (600Ks and 1200Ks) I DO NOT follow that 10% rule!! I'd never get there!!
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Old 08-09-05, 07:14 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metieval
sorry if this is off topic, but can you help me out and explain recovery week? or what is recovery?

http://www.onelook.com/?w=recovery&ls=a

"Quick definitions (recovery)

noun: the act of regaining or saving something lost (or in danger of becoming lost)
noun: return to an original state (Example: "The recovery of the forest after the fire was surprisingly rapid")
noun: gradual healing (through rest) after sickness or injury"


Or in the case of exercise ... allowing your body to rest so that it can build the muscle, like "gradual healing", or "returning to an original state".

You do know that exercise tears down the muscles, right? And that rest builds them up stronger than they were before?
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Old 08-10-05, 07:30 AM   #12
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Yea, what Machka said. i'd also use weekly volume not single ride day. what do I know I come in last in my cat5 races every week.
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Old 08-10-05, 09:23 AM   #13
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The 10% rule is based on weekly mileage. The reason there is a rule, and its not just for cycling, it to allow the body time to adjust to an increase in output. For example, you donít want to ride 100 miles the first week, 200 the second, 300 the third and 400 the 4th, you would obviously be overtraining. So the very liberal 10% figure is out there.

As an athlete with miles in their legs we can push that rule, so long as we are cognitive of overtraining symptoms. Now in your case myvw, your age will give you WAY more latitude in pushing it then some of us.

Rather then attempting to map out every ride, or every week, just ride lots. Keep track of the miles. If you have a big week, say 400 miles and the previous few weeks have been around 250, do a 200 mile week with minimal climbing.

Also for base training, log your time. Time in the saddle is what builds a base. Do 20 mile rides, do 100 mile rides, do em all. Donít fall into the habit of thinking that a ride 'has' to be a certain mileage. Have 45 minutes, try doing a 15 mile ride, have 6 hours, ride to the beach and back. Point is its winter, you have all day on the weekends, there are lots of group rides, its not time for intervals or repeats, look around and enjoy riding.
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Old 08-10-05, 11:03 AM   #14
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Generally, I have heard the 10% rule applied to weekly mileage. But it is not a hard and fast thing.

I ride quite a bit. I ride the high 200s in a week. But I am in good enough shape to know that I could ride 500 miles next week with no problem. It is just a matter of finding the time and being sure that I eat right and ride within myself on the rides themselves.

Come to think of it, it is obvious that the 10% rule does not apply. Do you think that the people who do RAM (Race Across America) ride 90% of that distance in training? Do you think that Tour de France riders ride 90% of the distances they do in the Tour in training? I suggest that none of the participants does anything close to it.
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Old 08-10-05, 11:07 AM   #15
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By the way you spelt mileage wrong multiple times.
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Old 08-14-05, 06:01 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by operator
By the way you spelt mileage wrong multiple times.
well I'm glad you can read! (but honestly it has no correlation to the thread)




Anywho,

Im know in the process of reading about base miles. Its alot to think about!
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Old 08-14-05, 08:10 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by operator
By the way you spelt mileage wrong multiple times.
I'm not sure but I think you spelled spelt wrong. Unless you are referring to a grain.
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Old 08-15-05, 06:32 AM   #18
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Well, there's nothing wrong with trying to keep an accurate record of your training. And it's good that you've read about training.

Just remember, that as you attempt to put your new "plans" into practice that you are not a machine and will not necessarily respond to the schedule as you intend.

All "plans" are lists or schedules of introducing ascending "loads" and "goals" on the athlete as he/she progresses through a training program. Each "step" in the plan needs to be completed at the rate the athlete's body can tolerate, not by calendar schedule.

As far as you "question" regarding a 10% "gain".. .. well "gain over what"?

I don't see anything in your plans on how you intend to evaluate your fitness - so what's the point?

Simply completing miles, is no measure of additional fitness - "when I can ride centuries already".......
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Old 08-17-05, 04:14 AM   #19
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You also have to break up the weeks into macrocycles. The transition between the last-week of an aerobic macrocycle will probably see an increase of 20% in mileage going into the 1st week of an endurance macrocycle. Also going from the last week of the endurace into the 1st week of a strength macrocycle will see a drop of 30% in mileage. You have to balance mileage with intensity.

"As far as you "question" regarding a 10% "gain".. .. well "gain over what"?"

Yeah, there are numerous measurement metrics, and I think mileage is a pretty poor one. I've got a standardized TT, hillclimb and sprint courses with known timings. I then devise a workout schedule such that my improvement in times on those course improve as fast as possible per week. Typically, I find that the intensity of training, and coordinating the optimal amounts of rest in between will give me much faster improvements in speed in the TT, hillclimb and sprints than mileage.

Once you get to a certain point, you can ride 700-800 miles a week no problems, and do triple-centuries in a single day. What's the point? It's not gonna win you any kind of races other than the RAAM with that kind of a training regimen.

In VW's case, his best training by far, will be to do 1-2 practice crits a week.
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