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  1. #1
    Senior Member skinny's Avatar
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    High Protein Smoothie

    Here's a little something I've been working on and I thought I'd post it:

    1/3 cup soy flour
    1 small can condensed milk
    1/3 cup chopped walnuts
    1 tblspn chopped almonds
    2 bananas
    ~5 blackberries or similar
    16oz orange juice
    water and ice

    Put in blender and smoothie! I think you'll get roughly 40+ grams of protein in this. I drink one after my workouts as a recovery drink.

  2. #2
    Climbing Fool terrymorse's Avatar
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    From what I 've read, that seems like a lot of protein to take at once in a recovery drink. 25 g is a common amount in the commercial recovery drinks.

    I put about 25 g of whey protein in my recovery drink.
    Managing Director, Undiscovered Country Tours

  3. #3
    ???What??? barleyrocket's Avatar
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    I thought the recovery drinks (as opposed to a protien shake) was about getting your muscles stored with glycogen? so the added protien won't help as much as the 1:4-1:7 protien to carb recovery drinks on the market. Or am I smokin' barley again?
    ???Huh???

  4. #4
    Fattest Thin Man Az B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barleyrocket
    I thought the recovery drinks (as opposed to a protien shake) was about getting your muscles stored with glycogen? so the added protien won't help as much as the 1:4-1:7 protien to carb recovery drinks on the market. Or am I smokin' barley again?
    I thought it was both?

    Az

  5. #5
    bzzzz fuzzthebee's Avatar
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    I thought that you could only process ~30 grams of protein per meal, and the rest is just wasted.

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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny
    Here's a little something I've been working on and I thought I'd post it:

    1/3 cup soy flour
    1 small can condensed milk
    1/3 cup chopped walnuts
    1 tblspn chopped almonds
    2 bananas
    ~5 blackberries or similar
    16oz orange juice
    water and ice

    Put in blender and smoothie! I think you'll get roughly 40+ grams of protein in this. I drink one after my workouts as a recovery drink.
    If you're drinking it as a recovery drink, you'd be much better off with some whey protein, dextrose, and milk/soy milk. The fat content in the soy flour, walnuts, and almonds, along with the fiber slows down digestion and subsequently the shuttling of carbs and protein to muscles. Looks like a TON of calories for one drink too...

    And fuzzthebee - it varies with each individual, the amount of protein a body can digest at "once" is really debatable. I'd say, as far as recovery goes, get as much protein as you can while sticking to your calorie limits.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by fuzzthebee
    I thought that you could only process ~30 grams of protein per meal, and the rest is just wasted.

    thats about right. 20-30 grams for most people. Piss out the rest.....

  8. #8
    Senior Member skinny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blaise655
    If you're drinking it as a recovery drink, you'd be much better off with some whey protein, dextrose, and milk/soy milk. The fat content in the soy flour, walnuts, and almonds, along with the fiber slows down digestion and subsequently the shuttling of carbs and protein to muscles. Looks like a TON of calories for one drink too...

    And fuzzthebee - it varies with each individual, the amount of protein a body can digest at "once" is really debatable. I'd say, as far as recovery goes, get as much protein as you can while sticking to your calorie limits.
    Ok, the 1/3 cup of full fat raw soy flour has only ~ 5 grams of fat total: 1 gram of saturated fat, 3 grams of polyunsaturated fats, and 1 gram of monounsaturated fats, and ~110 calories. The walnuts have ~28 grams of fat total, which is roughly 40% of Daily Value, with only ~2 grams of saturated fats, which is roughly 12% of Daily Value, and they have a very high omega factor, which is a good thing. The walnuts have ~180 calories. The almonds have ~3 grams of total fat and less than 1 gram of saturated fats, and ~60 calories.

    Total of all fats in the 3 combined ingredients is ~36 grams of fat of which only maybe 4 grams max is saturated. Total of all calories in these three ingredients is ~350 calories. The entire smoothie may be ~ 500 calories. Not particularly dangerous sounding or fattening sounding to me. And it's all good stuff and will satisfy you like a complete meal. Personally, I'm not afraid of fats, just saturated fats.

    It's been interesting to read the responses to this simple smoothie, ranging from "...I read.." some uncited whatever that you should only use 25 grams of protein because that is what the commercial drinks use, to this has tons of calories. Hopefully some will see that this combines 3 different types of protein in it, is very inexpensive, especially if you reduce or eliminate the walnuts, and tastes great. Modify to suit your needs.

  9. #9
    Senior Member crawfman's Avatar
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    Try a pasta smoothie.

    Wes

  10. #10
    Climbing Fool terrymorse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny
    It's been interesting to read the responses to this simple smoothie, ranging from "...I read.." some uncited whatever that you should only use 25 grams of protein because that is what the commercial drinks use...
    What, you want me to do all the work? Okay, here's a stab:

    A woman over 19 needs between 45-50 grams of protein a day. A man over 19 needs 58 - 63 grams of protein a day. And these requirements are much higher than the World Health Organization and many nutritional researchers believe.

    2 grams of protein per kilogram of body mass is too much protein and may carry health risks.

    Couldn't find any data on a per-meal basis, only on a per-day basis. Most of the references recommend spacing daily protein intake equally over each meal.
    Managing Director, Undiscovered Country Tours

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by crawfman
    Try a pasta smoothie.

    Wes

    lol....tuna and chicken breast smoothie for your protein needs!!!!

  12. #12
    Senior Member skinny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by terrymorse
    What, you want me to do all the work? Okay, here's a stab:

    A woman over 19 needs between 45-50 grams of protein a day. A man over 19 needs 58 - 63 grams of protein a day. And these requirements are much higher than the World Health Organization and many nutritional researchers believe.

    2 grams of protein per kilogram of body mass is too much protein and may carry health risks.

    Couldn't find any data on a per-meal basis, only on a per-day basis. Most of the references recommend spacing daily protein intake equally over each meal.
    Studies show that protein requirements increase as activity levels increase, and endurance athletes need close to twice as much protein as sedentary individuals, up to 1.4grams per kilogram of body mass. Just curious, why would you cite protein requirements for a sedentary person in a discussion of protein in a recovery drink?

    http://66.102.7.104/search?q=cache:O...athletes&hl=en

    http://www.exrx.net/Nutrition/Protein.html

  13. #13
    Climbing Fool terrymorse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny
    Just curious, why would you cite protein requirements for a sedentary person in a discussion of protein in a recovery drink?
    Neither of my cited articles mention the word "sedentary", yet I am aware of the increased protein requirements for endurance athletes. The range is 0.8 g/kg to about 1.4, depending on activity level.

    The upper limit appears to be 1.4 g/kg of body mass. The cited article states that 2 gm/kg is too much, so let's go with the 1.4 figure as the high end of healthy consumption for the most active athlete. The guidelines I have found recommend determining your protein needs, then splitting the intake evenly over all the daily meals. If one follows those recommendations, 40 gm consumed 4 times per day is 160 gm, adequate for a 114 kg (252 lb) elite endurance athlete. That's a pretty big person to be doing elite endurance. 160 gm of protein per day would be too much for an 80 kg (176 lb) athlete.

    I could cite references to the potential health risks of consuming too much protein, but I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader.
    Managing Director, Undiscovered Country Tours

  14. #14
    Senior Member skinny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by terrymorse
    Neither of my cited articles mention the word "sedentary", yet I am aware of the increased protein requirements for endurance athletes. The range is 0.8 g/kg to about 1.4, depending on activity level.

    The upper limit appears to be 1.4 g/kg of body mass. The cited article states that 2 gm/kg is too much, so let's go with the 1.4 figure as the high end of healthy consumption for the most active athlete. The guidelines I have found recommend determining your protein needs, then splitting the intake evenly over all the daily meals. If one follows those recommendations, 40 gm consumed 4 times per day is 160 gm, adequate for a 114 kg (252 lb) elite endurance athlete. That's a pretty big person to be doing elite endurance. 160 gm of protein per day would be too much for an 80 kg (176 lb) athlete.

    I could cite references to the potential health risks of consuming too much protein, but I'll leave that as an exercise for the reader.
    You didn't use the word sedentary, but you cited numbers for sedentary people. And I guess I'm weird, but I only eat 3x a day. It is interesting how internet discussions go. I suppose it isn't obvious to everyone, but one doesn't have to assume a consumption of 40g of protein at every meal for 4 meals. I'm not sure where that comes from. A recovery drink, which would serve as a meal for me, is designed to aid in recovery, and provide unique nutritional needs for that time after a hard workout. Why would we have to assume that every meal have 40 grams of protein, and that the subject would eat 4 meals and have to be eating 160 grams of protein a day??

    A weight of 170 for an adult male is not unusual for someone training in an endurance sport like cycling. Someone at that weight may be able to use up to 115 grams of protein a day, which based on your model of consuming the same amount of protein at every meal(highly unlikely) at a normal 3 meals a day, would be consistent with the protein in the above smoothie.

    YMMV

  15. #15
    Climbing Fool terrymorse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny
    Why would we have to assume that every meal have 40 grams of protein, and that the subject would eat 4 meals and have to be eating 160 grams of protein a day??
    We don't have to assume that, but those are the recommendations I see from several sources. Step 1: determine your daily protein requirement. Step 2: spread your protein consumption equally over the meals consumed in a day.

    4 meals a day is also a common recommendation: breakfast, lunch, recovery meal/drink, dinner.

    There are also sources that claim 40 grams of protein, consumed all at once, will be difficult to digest completely.
    Managing Director, Undiscovered Country Tours

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    Quote Originally Posted by crawfman
    Try a pasta smoothie.

    Wes
    Are you serious Wes.. .have you tried this?


    Skinny... I was wondering if that is too much protein.. would it be a good idea to split it in half?

  17. #17
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    Why dont you add soy protien powder instead of the flour? It should be the same consistancy.

  18. #18
    UareFASTjustNOTfastENOUGH MasterSezFaster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by terrymorse
    ...If one follows those recommendations, 40 gm consumed 4 times per day is 160 gm, adequate for a 114 kg (252 lb) elite endurance athlete. That's a pretty big person to be doing elite endurance...
    Hey I resemble that remark (at least when I used to ride 250mi/week) Actually I go with the 2g/kg, have been for the last 19 years. It works for me but I do not have a problem digesting high amounts of protein.

    You should also increase water consumption as you increase your protein intake. It will help with digestion, flush the kidneys and lower the chances of stones.

    As far as the shake goes, I think I will stick with my 16oz whole milk, 1 table spoon of peanut butter, chocolate protein mix and 2 bananas.



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinny
    Ok, the 1/3 cup of full fat raw soy flour has only ~ 5 grams of fat total: 1 gram of saturated fat, 3 grams of polyunsaturated fats, and 1 gram of monounsaturated fats, and ~110 calories. The walnuts have ~28 grams of fat total, which is roughly 40% of Daily Value, with only ~2 grams of saturated fats, which is roughly 12% of Daily Value, and they have a very high omega factor, which is a good thing. The walnuts have ~180 calories. The almonds have ~3 grams of total fat and less than 1 gram of saturated fats, and ~60 calories.

    Total of all fats in the 3 combined ingredients is ~36 grams of fat of which only maybe 4 grams max is saturated. Total of all calories in these three ingredients is ~350 calories. The entire smoothie may be ~ 500 calories. Not particularly dangerous sounding or fattening sounding to me. And it's all good stuff ...
    Um, you may want to check your math on the calories. The ingredients you list above are 350, the OJ is another 200, the bananas are another 200. So you're up to 750 cals without the condensed milk. If you're drinking a 5 oz can or regular condensed milk....(dramatic pause)...that's about another 500 calories. Check the label, 130 cals per 2 tbls. If you're using fat-free, it's only about 100 cals. Why not just you regular skim milk?

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