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  1. #1
    Senior Member TwoTyred's Avatar
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    Percentages for fat, carb and protein?

    As active cyclists, what percentage of calories
    should come from fat,carb, and protein?
    He who speaks bombastically shall bear witness to his own homonym!

  2. #2
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    Depends upon your workout that day.. On slow days where I eat 3000 calories, it's usually 10/50/40% fat/carb/proteins. On a 6000 calorie century day, it's gonna be 5/80/15% fat/carb/proteins. Did a 154mile ride last weekend and ate about 8000 calories, worked out to be about 4/85/11% fat/carb/proteins. I'll usually have a fixed amount of fats & proteins and will vary the carbs based upon my workout needs. Regardless of the intensity or distance of your workouts, you're not gonna need and your body's not going to absorb more than 75-100gm of protein a day anyway.

  3. #3
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    Well, under the new guidelines, it's: carbs= 45- 65%, protein= 10- 35%, and fat= 20- 35%. How much of each will depend on how active you are, and I don't think we can speculate, since we don't know you and don't know how much physical activity you do and what your goals are. Generally, if you stay within the recommended guidelines and maintain a regular exercise routine, you should be ok with what I've given you. If you can't pay to see a nutritionist or dietitian, then experiment around with the foods until you've found something that works for you and your goals.

    Koffee

  4. #4
    Senior Member TwoTyred's Avatar
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    no, i can't afford to pay a dietitian, but i've just discovered
    Fitday.com and am hoping it will be helpful..
    He who speaks bombastically shall bear witness to his own homonym!

  5. #5
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    Fitday.com should really help you. Stick with the new RDA guidelines, and use fitday to keep track of your eating. Since you're doing it on your own, expect to do some tweaking every now and then until you get something that works for you.

    Koffee

  6. #6
    Killing Rabbits
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    I have read that 40-30-30 (c-p-f) is ideal for endurance athletes, which fits Koffees recommendations.

    Danno is right in that you are not going to eat much fat or protein on a long bike ride and your %’s will change (that said I love a few nuts on longer rides).

  7. #7
    Senior Member TwoTyred's Avatar
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    well, i basically want to lose all unnecessary body
    fat while simulataneously improving performance
    enough to beat Lance.. pretty much...

    i'm amazed at what i've already learned from
    fitday, one friggin' soda was 270 calories and
    i could have had a full plate of pasta for almost
    that same caloric amount, also, it looks like what i
    considered a low fat diet was really not, i just
    assumed lean ground beef was ok, heh. no
    wonder i've not really lost weight even with
    all my riding and heart rate this, and heart
    rate that etc...
    gotta thank theis board for
    many of it's helpful information, perhaps
    one day that euro cut jersey won't be
    such an eyesore--and now i know what
    women mean when they talk about
    fitting into a dress.. gawd what happened!!
    there was a time when a case of beer and
    a trip to McDonalds was all it took to maintain
    a svelte physique..
    He who speaks bombastically shall bear witness to his own homonym!

  8. #8
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    Let me tell you- everytime I go to a conference on nutrition, I come back not wanting to eat anything- like I'm heading towards anorexia! Then I get hungry and eat anyway. But still, even when I eat, I am very conscious about what they tell us. One of the things I stopped doing was drinking soda, because it has so many empty calories, and it's like wasting money, besides having to now waste all that time burning off all those calories.

    You could always get the book called "Nutrition for Serious Athletes" by Dan Benardot. That book's become a staple in my book collection.

    Koffee

  9. #9
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoTyred
    i'm amazed at what i've already learned from
    fitday, one friggin' soda was 270 calories and
    i could have had a full plate of pasta for almost
    that same caloric amount, also, it looks like what i
    considered a low fat diet was really not, i just
    assumed lean ground beef was ok, heh. no
    wonder i've not really lost weight even with
    all my riding and heart rate this, and heart
    rate that etc...
    Heh, heh.. you need to read the labels a little more closely...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeeTL
    Hijack:

    Koffee,

    What do you think about "Eat to Live"? It's been recommended here, and I've bought into the concepts...
    I haven't read it, so I don't have too much knowledge on it, but I do hear it recommends giving up dairy, which I can't see happening, plus incorporating more soy, which may or may not be the best thing for people. Other than that, it sounds like a sensible eating plan that educates people about good nutrition habits.

    Koffee

  11. #11
    RIP Shiznaz. DoshKel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DannoXYZ
    Depends upon your workout that day.. On slow days where I eat 3000 calories, it's usually 10/50/40% fat/carb/proteins. On a 6000 calorie century day, it's gonna be 5/80/15% fat/carb/proteins. Did a 154mile ride last weekend and ate about 8000 calories, worked out to be about 4/85/11% fat/carb/proteins. I'll usually have a fixed amount of fats & proteins and will vary the carbs based upon my workout needs. Regardless of the intensity or distance of your workouts, you're not gonna need and your body's not going to absorb more than 75-100gm of protein a day anyway.
    You serious? 8000 calories? I can understand that with the ride length, but damn .

    I thought I ate a lot at 2,220 or so heh.

    How much do you eat on days that you don't exercise at all? (if those days exist )

    Cheers.

  12. #12
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    I have 2-3 days off and I'll eat 2000 calories or so.

    Well, that 8000 calories within a 24-hour period. I'll eat 1500 in the hours before the ride and 2000 afterwards. Actually about 2000 more than I actually burned off, but I want to make sure I'm not breaking any muscle apart to replenish glycogen stores after the ride. And I want to be fully recovered and stocked up for the next day.

    Just getting my body used to processing a lot of calories and delivering them to my muscles. Got a 24-hour race coming up in a couple weeks and I calculated the most I can absorb in that time is about 7000-8000 calories (along with 4-6 gallons of water). And I'll burning off over 13,000 calories at the pace I want to go, so I'll be at a 5000 calorie deficit. I might be able to make up the difference with the 2000 calories of stored glycogen and burning fat. But I may need to slow down... we'll see...

    I'm going to experiment with some high glycemic-index carbs and play around with some forms that can diffuse passively through the intestinal walls without requiring an active exchange of a sodium-ion like glucose... Maybe we can do an IV-drip of a glucose solution from a Camelback...
    Last edited by DannoXYZ; 10-18-05 at 03:30 AM.

  13. #13
    Senior Member AnthonyG's Avatar
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    For better or worse here's what the Weston A Price Foundation has to say on macronutrient percentages.

    http://www.westonaprice.org/basicnut...rientland.html

    It's a pretty straight forward and factual article.

    Regards, Anthony

  14. #14
    Senior Member jennings780's Avatar
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    From www.swimbikerunstlouis.com:

    Are You In the Zone?

    Jaime Marcy RD, LD.

    Many clients walk into my office in the Zone- the 40% carb, 30% fat, 30% protein Zone. Even athletes have succumbed to the pressure of avoiding carbohydrates and as a result, some have compromised their performance. Throughout our session I gently lead them out of the Zone and guide them back towards, 55-60% carb, 15-20% pro and 20-25% fat, a standard sports nutrition recommendation that continues to reward followers with enhanced performance.

    How to tell if you're getting enough carbs.....
    You may want to re-evaluate the composition of your diet if: you are fatiguing earlier than usual or expected, you feel tired all of the time, your recovery after an event takes too long, you avoid carbs at meals (i.e. pasta, bread, rice, cereal), or you are consistently consuming more than one no carb meal per day. A good rule of thumb during heavy training is 10 grams of carbs per kilogram of body weight (divide weight in pounds by 2.2).


    Sample Carb - Content
    1 cup pasta - 40 grams
    1 Bagel (3.5") - 37 grams
    Cliff Bar - 45 grams
    3/4 cup oatmeal (dry) - 40 grams
    1 medium apple - 20 grams

    Testimonials…..
    I am often told, "a friend of mine cut her carbs and is now racing better and feeling better that ever." Beware, it is important to realize that it is VERY likely that she may not have been eating enough protein or fat before starting this new plan. Sports Nutrition is a science with a tremendous amount of research supporting the importance of proper fuel for optimal nutrition and thus, peak performance.

    Listen to your body..…
    Take the time to hear what your body is telling you, for example you bike for 3 hours and are ravenous all day…your body is telling you that it needs to replace those 1500 calories you burned in order to prepare for your next ride!!!! Some athletes think they are doing themselves a favor by denying their hunger. On the flip side, some athletes give themselves permission to eat graze constantly (even when they are not truly hungry) and end up eating more calories than they need…. just because they think they should or feel they have earned it.

    What should you do to get back into the sports nutrition zone?
    1. Write it down. Keep a food log of your actual intake, this allows for an easier, more accurate assessment of diet adequacy.
    2. Legalize carbs. Incorporate high-quality carbohydrates such as whole grain breads, pasta, rice and fruit in your balanced diet.
    3. Track your training. Critique training performance in relation to dietary intake to determine if changing your diet really does improve training and competition.
    4. Individualize it. Consult a Sports Nutritionist to determine your best training diet.

    Bottom line…..
    Carbohydrate is the body's preferred energy source. Inadequate carbohydrate intake triggers a vicious cycle beginning with glycogen depletion leading to decreased endurance, decreased maximal effort, catabolism of lean body mass and ultimately the dreaded "BONK". Balance your diet, eat your carbs, smoke the competition.

  15. #15
    Senior Member BasicJim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by koffee brown
    Well, under the new guidelines, it's: carbs= 45- 65%, protein= 10- 35%, and fat= 20- 35%. How much of each will depend on how active you are, and I don't think we can speculate, since we don't know you and don't know how much physical activity you do and what your goals are. Generally, if you stay within the recommended guidelines and maintain a regular exercise routine, you should be ok with what I've given you. If you can't pay to see a nutritionist or dietitian, then experiment around with the foods until you've found something that works for you and your goals.

    Koffee
    If I am trying to get down to my "fighting weight" and have about 20 lbs before ideal, should I keep my fat percentage lower, like <15% or doesn't it work like that?

    Do you just stick to dietary guidelines to lose weight, or should it be somehow adjusted?

    TIA,

    Jim

  16. #16
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    Simplest guideline is to watch the calorie-deficit. Burn off about 500 calories more per day than you take in. That's the bottom-line really. I've lost 20-lbs between 1-Jan and 15-Feb in order to get ready for the collegiate-season on vastly different diets. Some years it was "the Zone" with high-fat/high-protein and 30/40 fat/protein, other years it was high-carbs/low-everything at 60% carbs, 20/20 fat/protein. In both cases, I lost the 20-lbs I had gained over Thanksgiving & Christmas. Just don't create too large of a calorie-deficit, 500/day is the most you want to do. About 1000/day if you're really in shape and are exercising a lot.

    I don't think there's some "magical" formulae for these ratios. Just the success of different diet philosophies using wide ranges of ratios indicate that it's not that big of a deal. The concept I'm introducing here is the variable ratio linked to total calorie intake. It think the absolute amounts makes a bigger difference and you need a minimum amount of essential fatty-acid & protein in your diet, above that it doesn't help and can be a hindrance (fat piles on the body with 90% efficiency, carbs 40%). As mentioned before, the minimum amount of protein is around 50gm/day, 75gm/day if you're really active, 100gm/day just to be sure but the extra is not much help. So on my 8000-calorie day, eating 220gm of protein is definitely overkill, but it's hard not to get it with the 3 monster bean burritos and 5 fish tacos I inhaled at the 75-mile halfway point. My primary goal was to get sufficient carbs during and after the ride; that's the most important point in acheiving maximum fitness-improvement rate. Not enough carbs is an evil condition that'll cause your body to take apart perfectly good muscles to burn during the ride and to restore its glycogen supplies afterwards. You're taking a step backwards for your one step forward and you'll end up a plateau somewhere that you can't progress beyond.

    So the question should perhaps be revised to say:

    "What's the recommend percentages of fat/carb/protein for a 2000 cal/day diet? for 4000 cal/day? for 8000 cal/day?"

    Because it will certainly not be the same ratios. As long as you're getting essential fatty-acids, you can go lower than 20% fats. It depends upon whether you're eating 2000 or 3000 cal/day. The chances of getting those fatty-acids in are good with eating 400 cal/fats a day, and the percentages will change depending upon your total intake. That's done more easily with a seafood diet that has fish and shellfish. But if you're not into seafood, you'll want a variety of meats like chicken, veal, lamb, and pork.

    So in summary, keeping low on fats won't necessarily relate directly to weight-loss. It's based upon the ratio of calories-out vs. calories-in. You can have higher fat-ratios with a low total-calorie count and it'll result in weight-loss. A low fat-ratio with a high total-calorie count that you can't burn off will actually result in weight-gain. So it's best to keep your eye on the calorie-deficit, that's the most significant directly-related number in terms of weight-loss.
    Last edited by DannoXYZ; 10-18-05 at 03:07 PM.

  17. #17
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    Hey Danno,

    Ive been reading your posts and they are great. I am wondering if given the same percentages for protein(around 30%), is it better to get more of the remaining calories from fat or from carbohydrates? Im not looking to gain weight but to maintain lean muscle mass while doing both running/cycling and weights. I use to go on getting my remaining calories from carbs( usually 50%) and then the rest from fat (20%) but got the impression that this might not be good. I dont know if it is the current low carb fad or what but it seems like carbs are getting a bad rep lately as "nonessential" or less essential source of energy and nutrients and compared to getting more fats. What is your take on this? Do carbohydrates contribute more to fat gain and less to muscle building and should I be switching more of my carb calories into fat calories?

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