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Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

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Old 12-24-05, 06:13 PM   #51
KeithA
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Thanks, Koffee. I'll do the mundane for now in hopes of the more spectacular when spring rolls round.
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Old 12-24-05, 06:43 PM   #52
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They should have a manner for you to test so that you can see if your fitness level increased. From there, you can start incorporating other training- hills/strength, intervals, etc. Check around their website and see what they've got.

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Old 10-09-06, 06:48 PM   #53
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this is a track related question. what type of training should be done in the off season, like weights, rollers,running... i really have no clue besides ride on rollers.
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Old 10-13-06, 10:54 AM   #54
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What do you all think of spin classes and stationary bikes? Are they an effective alternative during the winter? Or are you bound to lose some of your cycling fitness? Is this kind of the same idea as runners running on a treadmill?
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Old 10-13-06, 07:16 PM   #55
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On the one hand, trainers and spin classes aren't really riding, so you can't expect to start spring as strong as you left off in the fall.

However, they are lots better than nothing. It also gives you the opportunity to work on technique -- there's more to pedaling than just turning the cranks, and stuff like spin classes will help (as well as retain some of your aerobic capabilities). So yes, I think they can definitely be an effective alternative.

One of the down sides is that riding a trainer can be awfully boring.
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Old 10-14-06, 11:25 PM   #56
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You may be interested in crossfit www.crossfit.com. Here is my current schedule. I have found timing my work and trying to beat it really makes a huge difference.
Note,

All the "ring" stuff is done on gymnastic rings that can be adjusted in height and it seems to cut what I can do with the normal exercises in 1/2 it is great for uping the intesity and is good for all the stabilizer muscles.

http://www.mensjournal.com/hea...ages/wrk_pushups1.jpg

five rounds for time
5 ring pullups
10 ring Push-ups
20 squats

As many rounds as possible in 20 min
3 ring pullups
5 ring pushups
10 squats

5x5 for time
ring dips
inverted pullups

Tabata 20 seconds on 10 off
8 intervals push-ups
8 intervals ring Pullups
8 intervals plank
8 intervals squats
There is no rest between exercises

5x5 for time
hand stand pushups
ring pullups

For Time
25 ring pullups
50 ring pushups
100 squats

I have a very compelling tabata article and will post it if I can find.
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Old 10-18-06, 08:29 AM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzy_cyclist
On the one hand, trainers and spin classes aren't really riding, so you can't expect to start spring as strong as you left off in the fall.

However, they are lots better than nothing. It also gives you the opportunity to work on technique -- there's more to pedaling than just turning the cranks, and stuff like spin classes will help (as well as retain some of your aerobic capabilities). So yes, I think they can definitely be an effective alternative.

One of the down sides is that riding a trainer can be awfully boring.
I think you're pretty wrong with regards to trainers. Physiologically, you are pushing the pedals and exerting a force. Whether it's indoors, or out, you're body won't know the difference. Watts are watts. Now, since you're actually not riding per se, your bike handling skills may suffer as a result.

But in terms of fitness, if you really want to put in the time over the winter on the trainer, there is no reason you can't come into spring as strong or stronger than in the fall.
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Old 11-05-06, 10:40 PM   #58
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I have heard the same thing concerning people acting like riding on a trainer is only going to help a fraction of what actual riding does. I would think it would be fairly close. I have been riding my friend's Kurt Kinetic trainer the last week and I feel like it is giving me close to workout my regular road ride does. I actually have been able to ride longer each ride since the trainer takes out the getting gear together and the 30 minute round trip in the car I normally take. Instead of riding the bike an hour, I am getting around an hour and a half. I would love to hear someone knowledgeable comment on the subject. I just bought a kurt kinetic trainer, so I am hoping this purchase will be as beneficial as I originally had hoped.
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Old 12-05-06, 12:02 AM   #59
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I am having trouble adjusting to our gyms bicycle. It is one of those where you sit back in a chair (resembles a child car restraint) and pedal forwards instead of down. I find this difficult and what would you recommend for this type of training? Is it strictly for leg muscle or can I do something to help my cardio without using my lower back too much?
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Old 01-04-07, 08:29 PM   #60
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I have been using simplefit.org for my training latly and it kicks ass. The workoouts look easy but they are NOT and it is free!
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Old 02-21-07, 09:34 AM   #61
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I happen to like rollers with a resistance unit on them. You can do a lot on rollers with a resistance unit - steady state Z2, one legged pedaling, tempo intervals, FastPedal, TT tests, and all sorts of aerobic and anaerobic intervals. I've hit on a workout schema where I ride rollers for 1 hour to 1:45 (my personal boredom limit) using different workouts on different days of the week, and then twice a week I go to the gym after my roller workout and do a circuit workout, like Friel suggests, with one set of 30, working almost to failure. Takes 20 minutes. I've tried a lot of different weight workouts over the years and this is what works for me. Every one's different. I never get injured doing this, and that's critical. Plus, a hard weight lifting regimen is a big training hit. I find it cuts down on my ability to put in hard cycling time and that's not so good. Another thing I like at the gym is the StepMill - one of those endless stairs machines that looks like an escalator. Ride that thing for over an hour in Z3 and your legs will know you've done something. It's something different to do in the winter and helps my out of the saddle power.
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Old 03-14-07, 03:01 PM   #62
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KeithA
I think the guy I bought from is named James. He's located in Santa Monica and apparantly tunes 1000 of the machines a month for gyms and private owners.
The name you are trying to recall is Jeff Wimmer. He is at studiocycles.com. I got a spinner from him two years ago. I am still pounding away on it. If anyone is interested in this type of trainer. Jeff is your man!
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Old 10-03-07, 03:01 PM   #63
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Originally Posted by KeithA View Post
Where do spin cycles work out in the scheme of things?

Our LifeCycle is on its last legs. I also find it pretty boring, especially with getting out there and actually cycling. I know that a spin cycle won't be as exciting as actually riding my bike outdoors, but, with the spin DVD's, it should be some improvement.

The reason I'm thinking about a spin cycle is that my whole family has used the LifeCycle for years. I'd like something that we can all use. I'm thinking of the Lamond very seriously, so if anyone wants to say yea or nay, please do so before I spend the money.

By the way, this thread is a good idea.
I saw the LeMonde spin cyle. It is well designed. It is quiet and fully adjustable (stem hight, fore/aft, as well as fore/aft seat positions to guarantee proper knee-foot alignment (knees over toes in 3:00 prosition).

Despite the excitement of the bike, spin cycles are boring indeed if you get on it and mindlessly spin. I especially find that time passes very slowly when you watch the clock. If, on the other hand you come with a pre-written program, it can be quite challenging; something like this:

Warmup:
light gear sping 80 rpm's 50 pedals strokes each leg
light gear sping 90 rpm's 50 pedals strokes each leg
light gear sping 100 rpm's 50 pedals strokes each leg
gradually increase resistance over then next 100 strokes until you cannot maintain at least 80 rpm;s

Workout:
spin 50 strokes 80 rpm's
immediately followed by 50 strokes 90 rpm's
immediately followed by 50 strokes 100 rpm's
immediately followed by 50 strokes 110 rpm's
2 minute easy recovery and repeat 2 more times

Set modeately high gear and repeat standing

There are lots of things you can simulate by just programming them into your workout. Just make certain to program enough recovery time between intervals. Use a h/r monitor. Before you know it, you have put in 45-60 minutes.

Use a fan and keep and towel and lots of water on hand. If your rides are still boring, you are not working hard enough.
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Old 10-08-07, 10:29 AM   #64
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Let's say I wanted to do some serious indoor riding in the mornings. Breakfast before or after???
Thanks.
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Old 10-08-07, 10:43 AM   #65
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Let's say I wanted to do some serious indoor riding in the mornings. Breakfast before or after???
Thanks.
After...

Before is sometimes called Bonk Training. While some people can just wake up
and exercise, most can't. You run out of gas.
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Old 10-20-07, 10:46 PM   #66
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After...

Before is sometimes called Bonk Training. While some people can just wake up
and exercise, most can't. You run out of gas.
Actually, you shouldn't run out of gas. If you ate well the night before, then muscle glycogen stores will be fine in the morning.

Something light ought to do the trick. Do your workout, then eat your breakfast.
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Old 11-20-07, 03:58 PM   #67
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Any other comments on rollers with resistance units vs. trainers? It seems like the OP and a lot of other posts in this thread are only comparing trainers with roller that don't have resistance units. I haven't tried either and am looking for something for the winter...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Carbonfiberboy View Post
I happen to like rollers with a resistance unit on them. You can do a lot on rollers with a resistance unit - steady state Z2, one legged pedaling, tempo intervals, FastPedal, TT tests, and all sorts of aerobic and anaerobic intervals. I've hit on a workout schema where I ride rollers for 1 hour to 1:45 (my personal boredom limit) using different workouts on different days of the week, and then twice a week I go to the gym after my roller workout and do a circuit workout, like Friel suggests, with one set of 30, working almost to failure. Takes 20 minutes. I've tried a lot of different weight workouts over the years and this is what works for me. Every one's different. I never get injured doing this, and that's critical. Plus, a hard weight lifting regimen is a big training hit. I find it cuts down on my ability to put in hard cycling time and that's not so good. Another thing I like at the gym is the StepMill - one of those endless stairs machines that looks like an escalator. Ride that thing for over an hour in Z3 and your legs will know you've done something. It's something different to do in the winter and helps my out of the saddle power.
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Old 01-12-08, 05:43 PM   #68
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On the one hand, trainers and spin classes aren't really riding, so you can't expect to start spring as strong as you left off in the fall.

However, they are lots better than nothing. It also gives you the opportunity to work on technique -- there's more to pedaling than just turning the cranks, and stuff like spin classes will help (as well as retain some of your aerobic capabilities). So yes, I think they can definitely be an effective alternative.

One of the down sides is that riding a trainer can be awfully boring.
Agreed. The benefit of running on a treadmill is that you may be protecting your joints a bit more than running (at least on paved surfaces). Many treadmills have adjustable "softness" , have no holes or bumps, are usually well lit and you're running with your natural motion.

Spin bikes and trainers (not so much rollers), are very inflexible (esp. spin bikes) and the lack of natural flexibility contributes to added joint pressure.

Although I always really try to focus on my form, I'm especially sensitive when on the spin bike in an attempt to minimize repetitive stress on my joints (knees, hips, elbows).

An increase in (safe) spinning this winter has already really allowed a big improvement in mid-January fitness for me. I always try to get a spot where I can check my form in the mirror to reinforce proper knee alignment, smooth pedaling, etc. I still sweat buckets!
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Old 01-14-08, 07:46 PM   #69
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Actually, you shouldn't run out of gas. If you ate well the night before, then muscle glycogen stores will be fine in the morning.

Something light ought to do the trick. Do your workout, then eat your breakfast.
I do all of my summer riding and winter working-out in the morning without eating anything before the ride, just cramming the carbs the night before and staying hydrated. I haven't bonked yet, but now that I've said that I'll probably bonk tomorrow.
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Old 01-23-08, 08:44 AM   #70
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okay, cape. let's talk lifting from both a general health and a cycling viewpoint, and see what you think. i'm looking at an article that says you want to do multi-joint exercises (whatever that is). it goes on to say that if you lift, there are four multi-joint exercises you need to do above all others; pull-ups, squats, bench presses, and deadlifts. do you buy all that? i've also been toying with the idea of buying a home machine to do my lifting and get rid of the club membership. if you agree with the above stuff, it seems to me i wouldn't even have to buy a large home machine. all i would need would be a bench, a tall rack for bench presses and squats (maybe with pull-up handles on it), a bar or two, and some weights. does this sound reasonable?

---I don't buy all four of those exercises. I would say that pull-ups are a go. But I think that bench should be replaced with dips simply because it allows one to practice core stability much more than standard bench...and you can still add weight to it. Deads and squats are a problem area in that they do provide a great deal of benefits for a cyclist, but I feel that Olympic lifts such as: clean jerk, clean and press, snatch, etc, all using a sub-maximal weight (able to get 30-50 reps total) in a circuit fashion would be a more benefit the cyclist more as it strengthens the muscles yet still involves aerobic conditioning.
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Old 06-12-08, 11:08 PM   #71
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does anyone know where to get a roller trainer for the best price?
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Old 07-08-08, 08:53 AM   #72
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If you dont mind a used set, watch craigslist.com, etc. I recently saw a kreitler set-up (rollers and fan) listed at $200. Was already sold by the time I saw and called on the listing ! (less than a day)
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Old 09-04-08, 08:06 PM   #73
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I agree with the others: spin bikes and resistance trainers (or rollers I'd guess, though I've never used them) are great during the winter and can definitely keep your fitness up. In fact, I know someone who, for job reasons, had to switch all his training indoor after 20 years of regular training and actually improved his performance. While I wouldn't recommend that approach, I do think that trainers are particularly well suited for interval workouts--maybe even better than the road where you have to deal with stop signs and such. The only intervals I've found better more effective are those done behind a moped or scooter, and I don't have access to that now or over the winter.
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Old 10-29-08, 11:33 PM   #74
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question here, im seeing some opposing stuff on what kind of lifting to do. some say more reps less weights to build endurance, others like the performance training system site say to do one set to fail. which should i be working on?
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Old 11-09-08, 07:23 PM   #75
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Work in phases. Say, 6 weeks of endurance lifting, 4 weeks max strength, 6 weeks power (explosive movements in your lifts, less weight than strength but more than endurance), etc.
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