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  1. #1
    Senior Member Fastfwd's Avatar
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    Sodium in recovery drink and kidney stone

    I had 3 kidney stones last year. It hurts; a lot. My mother in law who experienced both tells in it's worse than childbirth.

    The doctor told me to stay away from salt as much as possible and drink a lot of water. I do that.

    Whenever I read aboiut recovery drinks, sodium is mentioned. This is the same as salt right? So I should stay away from recovery drinks?

    I know you guys are not doctors, just trying to see what you think. I'll ask my doctor next time I'm there.

  2. #2
    Senior Member rule's Avatar
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    Sodium is a soft, light, highly reactive metallic element that is naturally abundant, especially in common salt. So yeah, the sodium content that you are seeing in the recovery drinks is from the added salt.

    You do need to cover this with your doc. It's pretty simple to call them, give them the information about your situation, and get some guidance.

  3. #3
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    S what'd the doctor say?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fastfwd
    I had 3 kidney stones last year. It hurts; a lot. My mother in law who experienced both tells in it's worse than childbirth.

    The doctor told me to stay away from salt as much as possible and drink a lot of water. I do that.

    Whenever I read aboiut recovery drinks, sodium is mentioned. This is the same as salt right? So I should stay away from recovery drinks?

    I know you guys are not doctors, just trying to see what you think. I'll ask my doctor next time I'm there.
    Been there. Done that. Not fun.

    First, kidney stones can be made of different substances, so what is typically done is that they send your stone to a lab for analysis and then tell you what not to eat so that you don't ingest the same substances that your stones are made of.

    Second, studies show that the single most significant contributor to stones is chronic dehydration. Drink. Drink. And drink. A lot. My office staff makes fun of me because I hit the bathroom every 45 minutes or so because I drink so much. Being made fun of is much more tolerable than dealing with stones.

    Third, there is some disagreement over certain avoidance methods, so read up on the subject and educate yourself so at least you know why the doctors are saying what they are saying.

    Oh....and did I mention: Drink a LOT!

    Bob

  5. #5
    sch
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    Stones form for mostly unknown reasons, but are formed from relatively insoluble substances usually calcium salts of various types, less often uric acid stones. Sodium does not contribute in any significant way to this process. The sodium content of what you drink is insignificant compared to the sodium content in prepared food. Fast food is loaded with sodium. Generally speaking, the easier a food is to eat, ie the less you have to do with the food before eating the higher the sodium content is likely to be. This excludes such as fruit and RTE veggies.
    Steve

  6. #6
    Kelly Drive Amateur Boogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sch
    ... formed from relatively insoluble substances usually calcium salts of various types, less often uric acid stones. Sodium does not contribute in any significant way to this process.
    This is also my understanding.


    David

  7. #7
    Slow Moving Vehicle Jean Beetham Smith's Avatar
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    There is some evidence that high levels of sodium ehances calcium absorbtion from the gut, and so indirectly causes an increase in the amount of calcium excreted by the kidneys into the urine, where it can contribute to stone formation. All of this is not fully understood, but calcium restriction no longer seems to be the first recommendation, although oxalate restriction is still recommended. Of course, increased water consumption is still universally recommended.
    Help grow the future of cycling in the world. Volunteer at your local "earn-a-bike" program. In the Boston area http://www.bikesnotbombs.org/about

  8. #8
    Pokes On Spokes JPradun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jean Beetham Smith
    There is some evidence that high levels of sodium ehances calcium absorbtion from the gut, and so indirectly causes an increase in the amount of calcium excreted by the kidneys into the urine, where it can contribute to stone formation. All of this is not fully understood, but calcium restriction no longer seems to be the first recommendation, although oxalate restriction is still recommended. Of course, increased water consumption is still universally recommended.
    +1

    All I remember is that my kidney stone hurt like a *****. Nothing like having one of those in the 4th grade.

    Doc said to consume less chocolate/milk, but I no longer believe him. I seriously believe it was due to stress (moving, mom getting remarried, losing all friends for a new life, not liking step dad, etc) back then. I haven't had one since (soph in college) and I haven't changed my diet much. Just drink a lot of water and you should be ok. The only sodium you should be concerned about is if it's extremely prominent, ie, fast food, prezels, sports drinks while not exercising, etc.

  9. #9
    Real Human Being wild animals's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jean Beetham Smith
    There is some evidence that high levels of sodium ehances calcium absorbtion from the gut, and so indirectly causes an increase in the amount of calcium excreted by the kidneys into the urine, where it can contribute to stone formation. All of this is not fully understood, but calcium restriction no longer seems to be the first recommendation, although oxalate restriction is still recommended. Of course, increased water consumption is still universally recommended.
    excess protein does more or less the same thing, and contributes to osteoporosis as well.
    this is more informative than i can be: http://www.google.com/search?q=protein+kidney+stones

  10. #10
    '05 NUEser EJ123's Avatar
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    Do you drink a lot of cranberry juice?

  11. #11
    Faster but still slow slowandsteady's Avatar
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    Here is a good site that explains how and why stones form.

    http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseas...esadults/#what
    "Ride lots." -- Eddy Merckx

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