Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    Peloton Dog patentcad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Chester, NY
    My Bikes
    2013 Scott Foil, 2009 Scott Addict R2, 2008 Cervelo P3 TT bike, 2008 Motobecane Fly Ti Hard Tail MTB
    Posts
    55,994
    Mentioned
    25 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Patentcad's Miracle Diet- LOSE 46 lbs in 8 WEEKS!

    Well not really. I DID lose a maximum of 46 lbs. this year after a five year bout with back pain/surgery/pain pills and not cycling. Went from 208 lbs in March to as low as 162 in October 2005. But it didn't take 8 weeks and it wasn't easy or fast. Lots of riding.

    If you're trying to lose weight here's a few words of perspective from somebody who has done it. And I'm convinced it's the only way you can do it effectively:

    Whatever your specific weight loss goal may be - 20, 30, 40lbs - forget it. You can't wrap your head around losing 30 pounds and you can't do it in a day or two.

    You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows and you don't need a scale to know if you're getting thinner. Your pants and the mirror will tell you most of what you need to know. Put the scale in the closet.

    You're not going on a diet. Diets don't work, not really. You're altering your lifestyle. Your diet, your exercise, your thinking. Find an effective lifestyle and the weight will come off. Not as fast as you want it to perhaps, but it will happen.

    Like recovery from drugs or alcohol, it's a day at a time. Period. You can't alter your body TODAY but you can eat differently and go for a bike ride, can't you? That's what I did just about every day for 6 months or so. When I DID get on the scale I'd get frustrated when 200+ miles of weekly riding and eating right had the scale frozen @ 180 lbs. for WEEKS. That's when I stopped weighing myself. What was the point? I was changing my lifestyle for a number of reasons, and weight loss wasn't the biggest one. I figured I'd lose some more weight, but I really let it go.

    And of course, Voila, one day the AM weigh-in said '162'. But at that point I didn't care anymore. I looked good, felt great, etc. My wife is going to Jenny Craig to lose 25 lbs. or so. When I gave her this perspective the first day - it seemed to help. Two weeks later she's doing fine - and is 6lbs. lighter. She's walking every day - and seems to realize it's about a new approach to living. I'm hoping to get her back out on the bike this Spring.

    I'm not 162 now. I'm 171. But that's just winter weight gain (some of it water weight I'm sure) from the Holidays and not riding so much. It will come off. I have no control over that my scale tells me in the AM. But I can focus on my diet and ride my bike. Which is what I'm doing in anticipation of the upcoming riding season. I live in NY. They'll be racing in Central Park in 6 weeks : ).

    Again, it's not a 'diet'. It's a different way of living. Hopefully. That's the idea. I've been doing it for the better part of a year now. One day at a time. Why post this on a bike forum? I presume many of you are interested in fitness and maybe in losing weight. And that's how it worked for me. It's about getting an understanding of the difference between what you're powerless over - and what you CAN control.

    I bust people here for being 'weenies' but it's really all in fun. I'm the biggest friggin weenie of them all, and don't think I don't know it.

  2. #2
    Upgrading my engine DXchulo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Reno
    Posts
    5,631
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by patentcad

    You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows and you don't need a scale to know if you're getting thinner. Your pants and the mirror will tell you most of what you need to know. Put the scale in the closet.
    Good stuff, especially this one. Weight is not a great indicator of health. % body fat is better, but harder to measure. The easiest thing is to go by feel.

    Let's say someone lost 5 lbs of fat but gained 4 lbs of muscle. Why should that person get upset about "only" losing 1 lb?

    The goal should be to feel better and live longer, not to reach a certain weight.

    To put this in cycling terms, the goal should be to get up the hill faster, not to weigh the least. In general being lighter will make it easier to get up a hill, but it can be taken too far, at least in my experience. At a certain point you can begin to sacrifice strength (and ultimately speed) for a couple of pounds of body weight.
    centuryperweek.blogspot.com

  3. #3
    littlecircles bmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    3,336
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by patentcad
    Well not really. I DID lose a maximum of 46 lbs. this year after a five year bout with back pain/surgery/pain pills and not cycling. Went from 208 lbs in March to as low as 162 in October 2005. But it didn't take 8 weeks and it wasn't easy or fast. Lots of riding.

    If you're trying to lose weight here's a few words of perspective from somebody who has done it. And I'm convinced it's the only way you can do it effectively:

    Whatever your specific weight loss goal may be - 20, 30, 40lbs - forget it. You can't wrap your head around losing 30 pounds and you can't do it in a day or two.

    You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows and you don't need a scale to know if you're getting thinner. Your pants and the mirror will tell you most of what you need to know. Put the scale in the closet.

    You're not going on a diet. Diets don't work, not really. You're altering your lifestyle. Your diet, your exercise, your thinking. Find an effective lifestyle and the weight will come off. Not as fast as you want it to perhaps, but it will happen.

    Like recovery from drugs or alcohol, it's a day at a time. Period. You can't alter your body TODAY but you can eat differently and go for a bike ride, can't you? That's what I did just about every day for 6 months or so. When I DID get on the scale I'd get frustrated when 200+ miles of weekly riding and eating right had the scale frozen @ 180 lbs. for WEEKS. That's when I stopped weighing myself. What was the point? I was changing my lifestyle for a number of reasons, and weight loss wasn't the biggest one. I figured I'd lose some more weight, but I really let it go.

    And of course, Voila, one day the AM weigh-in said '162'. But at that point I didn't care anymore. I looked good, felt great, etc. My wife is going to Jenny Craig to lose 25 lbs. or so. When I gave her this perspective the first day - it seemed to help. Two weeks later she's doing fine - and is 6lbs. lighter. She's walking every day - and seems to realize it's about a new approach to living. I'm hoping to get her back out on the bike this Spring.

    I'm not 162 now. I'm 171. But that's just winter weight gain (some of it water weight I'm sure) from the Holidays and not riding so much. It will come off. I have no control over that my scale tells me in the AM. But I can focus on my diet and ride my bike. Which is what I'm doing in anticipation of the upcoming riding season. I live in NY. They'll be racing in Central Park in 6 weeks : ).

    Again, it's not a 'diet'. It's a different way of living. Hopefully. That's the idea. I've been doing it for the better part of a year now. One day at a time. Why post this on a bike forum? I presume many of you are interested in fitness and maybe in losing weight. And that's how it worked for me. It's about getting an understanding of the difference between what you're powerless over - and what you CAN control.

    I bust people here for being 'weenies' but it's really all in fun. I'm the biggest friggin weenie of them all, and don't think I don't know it.

    Agreed.
    I've been following the scale now... and it's damned frustrating. When I put it away for months at a time, my weight seems to drop...

    I've shed 62 pounds in the last 5 years. Riding, changing my diet. Hiking, XC Ski, Snowshoe, getting outside with the GPS and just wandering in the woods.

    Now I'm stuck in the 185-190 range and it feels like it'll never move.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    479
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    congrats on the weight loss. I did the same thing but it was a few years ago now I lost a total of 40 lbsfrom 205 to 165. and I agree with everything you have said except that what you did probably wouldn't have worked for me, or the next guy. but that said, lifestyle change is the first step and motivation to be healthier helps. I found that just tracking calories, reducing fats, and increasing fruits and vegatables worked,and the pounds just started to fall off. The main reason for getting on the scale on a daily basis is to make sure your not going in the wrong direction.I put the government food pyramid on the refrigerator door just as a reminder what balance to consume. if you take your current weight and multiply it times 15 thats the calorie amount you can consume without gaining weight. just pick your desired weight and multiply that times 15 and thats the calorie amount you need to consume to lose weight. As you see the theory is easy, doing it can be hard.but if you change what you eat,reduce the amount and stop eating once you hit the calorie number for that day you will lose weight. Not being hungry at that point is where the planning and types of food come in.if you eat lots of low calorie veggies and fruits, then add pasta and whole grains, with complex carbs,for energy. eat lean meats and low fat dairy for the 65 grams of daily protein you will not be hungry and losing that weight is easy and feels great. exercise helps but I didn't use it as a tool to lose weight. I weigh 175 now and thats from muscle gain from biking and working out. now keeping the weight off is just mathematics do the calorie numbers and you won't gain a pound.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    631
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You know, this is probably the best and most practical advice for weight loss that I've ever read.

    And this is coming from a doc who's seen hundreds of patients trying hundreds of diets and weight loss programs. Most of the time the only thing that gets lighter is your wallet.

  6. #6
    OCP
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    MILWAUKEE
    My Bikes
    The kind with two wheels
    Posts
    6,289
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    180 pounds?

    HA!

    I WISH!

    I suppose if I was really serious about this cycling stuff I'd make bigger sacrifices in my eating and get down to that weight, but that's actually kind of thin for me.....great for a cyclist, but overall, I'd rather be in the middle somewhere and enjoying some eating.

    Congrats on your loss.

    Two years ago when I picked up the pace on my riding I made an effort to lose weight and I have kept it off. I went from 225 (6'-1") to 190.

    My annual Christmas/winter weight gain is just now starting to melt off. Was 195 after New Year's, and am now 192 and slipping. During riding season I usually hover in the upper 180's.
    Hip, "Halffast Celebrity Fashionista"

  7. #7
    Cat None SDRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    San Diego
    My Bikes
    LOOK KG 461, LeMond Zurich, Giant Talon 29er 0
    Posts
    4,508
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by patentcad
    Well not really. I DID lose a maximum of 46 lbs. this year after a five year bout with back pain/surgery/pain pills and not cycling. Went from 208 lbs in March to as low as 162 in October 2005. But it didn't take 8 weeks and it wasn't easy or fast. Lots of riding.

    If you're trying to lose weight here's a few words of perspective from somebody who has done it. And I'm convinced it's the only way you can do it effectively:

    Whatever your specific weight loss goal may be - 20, 30, 40lbs - forget it. You can't wrap your head around losing 30 pounds and you can't do it in a day or two.

    You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows and you don't need a scale to know if you're getting thinner. Your pants and the mirror will tell you most of what you need to know. Put the scale in the closet.

    You're not going on a diet. Diets don't work, not really. You're altering your lifestyle. Your diet, your exercise, your thinking. Find an effective lifestyle and the weight will come off. Not as fast as you want it to perhaps, but it will happen.

    Like recovery from drugs or alcohol, it's a day at a time. Period. You can't alter your body TODAY but you can eat differently and go for a bike ride, can't you? That's what I did just about every day for 6 months or so. When I DID get on the scale I'd get frustrated when 200+ miles of weekly riding and eating right had the scale frozen @ 180 lbs. for WEEKS. That's when I stopped weighing myself. What was the point? I was changing my lifestyle for a number of reasons, and weight loss wasn't the biggest one. I figured I'd lose some more weight, but I really let it go.

    And of course, Voila, one day the AM weigh-in said '162'. But at that point I didn't care anymore. I looked good, felt great, etc. My wife is going to Jenny Craig to lose 25 lbs. or so. When I gave her this perspective the first day - it seemed to help. Two weeks later she's doing fine - and is 6lbs. lighter. She's walking every day - and seems to realize it's about a new approach to living. I'm hoping to get her back out on the bike this Spring.

    I'm not 162 now. I'm 171. But that's just winter weight gain (some of it water weight I'm sure) from the Holidays and not riding so much. It will come off. I have no control over that my scale tells me in the AM. But I can focus on my diet and ride my bike. Which is what I'm doing in anticipation of the upcoming riding season. I live in NY. They'll be racing in Central Park in 6 weeks : ).

    Again, it's not a 'diet'. It's a different way of living. Hopefully. That's the idea. I've been doing it for the better part of a year now. One day at a time. Why post this on a bike forum? I presume many of you are interested in fitness and maybe in losing weight. And that's how it worked for me. It's about getting an understanding of the difference between what you're powerless over - and what you CAN control.

    I bust people here for being 'weenies' but it's really all in fun. I'm the biggest friggin weenie of them all, and don't think I don't know it.
    Don't worry, we'll be here to constantly remind you.

  8. #8
    Eschew Obfuscation SesameCrunch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    My Bikes
    2005 Fuji Professional, 2002 Lemond Zurich, Folders - Strida, Merc, Dahon, Downtube, Recumbent folder
    Posts
    3,843
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Great post. Concise, practical and focuses on attitude/lifestyle. I totally agree with your philosophy.

    I also like your message about not focusing on weight. The scale is not the sole indicator of health. I have been exercising 5 days a week for the last 3 years and I'm down 3 or 4 pant sizes, body fat down to 12% (age 50). How much weight did I lose for the last 3 years' effort? About 3 pounds (but I'm looking a LOT better in a swimsuit ).

  9. #9
    Senior Member ronbridal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    524
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Patentcad's advice is right on. I lost a considerable amount of weight and am constantly asked what diet I used to do it. My reply to all is that I didn't go on any diet. I simply changed my lifestyle. The basics are simple . . . exercise more and consume fewer calories. Through this I came to the realization that it's probably better to eat a grilled or steamed chicken breast than two fried chicken breasts, two legs and a thigh from KFC! But seriously, weightloss should be a gradual thing, and most here have the ability to be successful at it. I mean, we all exercise here (cycle), right? Good luck to those that are on the road to weight loss and those that will soo begin the journey.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    My Bikes
    Trek 1000c
    Posts
    384
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Nice post. Healthy perspective.

    The funny thing with me and the scale is that while I was losing the first 30 pounds, I couldn't see it on my frame. Others could see it. If I didn't have the numbers on the scale telling me my weight was going down, I wouldn't have believed it and would have felt frustrated. My theory is I've never seen myself as a 'fat' person, so I didn't see the changes. And, when I avoid the scale, I seem to gain weight. Perhaps it's the feeling of accountability some form of measuring provides.

    It is lifestyle changes. Sometimes I don't realize how many changes I've made until I see people that I used to know or step into old situations.

    Sandy

  11. #11
    lillypad
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    131
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You offer some excellent comments on how to go about weight loss. The only thing that seems odd to me in your original statement is that you say that you should put your scale in the closet and forget about it yet later you comment that you have weighed yourself and found yourself to be nine pounds heavier.Your wife is on a weight-loss regimen but she is still weighing herself and found that she has lost six pounds.

    For some people, watching the scale is a great motivational tool. Many people cannot stay motivated unless they can see some form of week-to-week improvement. If a person is on a reduced calorie and exercise program to lose weight in order to become better at any type of long-duration aerobic exercise (albeit cycling, running, swimming, CC skiing, or any other form) you really don't want to add muscle at the same rate that you are losing fat. You really don't want to go from being a 245 pound obese person to a 245 pound person with 8% body fat unless you are trying out for the NFL. Here you exercise for 5 seconds then need to have a 45 second recovery (AKA huddle) time to prepare you for your next 5 second workout. This doesn't even take into account the 15 minute recovery time that you have between offense and defense (you don't see many guys playing both now like they used to).

    Bulk muscle is not advantageous in long-duration aerobic sports. The muscles that you are not using are simply more baggage that you have to carry along with you. Look at LA, he doesn't weigh 245.
    Last edited by lillypad; 01-21-06 at 10:21 AM.

  12. #12
    Peloton Dog patentcad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Chester, NY
    My Bikes
    2013 Scott Foil, 2009 Scott Addict R2, 2008 Cervelo P3 TT bike, 2008 Motobecane Fly Ti Hard Tail MTB
    Posts
    55,994
    Mentioned
    25 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    When I say 'put the scale in the closet' - that's a figure of speech. It's in the bathroom. But don't get on it every day. I weigh myself about once a week or so - just to see what's going on with my weight. But I don't get too upset when it's heavier than I want it to be - which is most of the time. I just shrug and keep doing what i'm doing. As for my wife, she goes to Jenny Craig and THEY weigh her on her weekly visits. I don't think she's using the scale here. But so far she's been losing some weight.

    I don't particularly agree with this notion that muscle weight is all good. Not for cycling or for general health. That's why the entire NFL is overweight by weight chart standards. Of course it's not particularly natural to carry around 30-100 lbs of excess musculature. And your cardiovascular system has to work to supply all that tissue with blood/oxygen. On the other hand cycling IS closer to what nature intended the human body for - aerobic exercise, and lots of it. I'm convinced we inhabit bodies that nature designed to spend 8 hours daily walking up and down hillsides hunting or foraging for food. NOT sitting in front of computers. And we wonder why so many of us get fat. Duh.

    And that's why diets fail so regularly. It's the notion that you're on some horrible restrictive 'diet'. Who can stick to THAT? Find a new way of LIVING - one that puts zero pressure on your weight loss time table - one that you're comfortable with -and that can work. More importantly you won't lose 20 lbs. - and then go OFF the 'diet' and gain it back. I'm still ON my 'diet' - it's a different way of living - and I'm not going off it for the forseeable future. And I won't be gaining that 40+lbs. back. Trust me.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Peterson Iowa
    My Bikes
    Trek 7000 and a Trek 1200
    Posts
    765
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Common sense approach-that will never work. LOL

  14. #14
    lillypad
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    131
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    LOL PC. I used to be 5 feet nothing and 200 pounds when I was in high school. Aerobic exercise has totally changed my life.

  15. #15
    Peloton Dog patentcad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Chester, NY
    My Bikes
    2013 Scott Foil, 2009 Scott Addict R2, 2008 Cervelo P3 TT bike, 2008 Motobecane Fly Ti Hard Tail MTB
    Posts
    55,994
    Mentioned
    25 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by oldspark
    Common sense approach-that will never work. LOL

    Sadly, that's true. I'm in AA too (I've gotten over the whole stigma thing with that, it's been a decade) and only a small percentage of those who go to their first meeting stick around for the miracle to happen. It's pretty similar.

    Does it work? Of course. Can everyone grasp these concepts and employ them in their lives? Maybe not. But if one person reads this thread and a light bulb goes over their head - then it's worth it. I saw the light bulb go over my wife's head when I talked to her about this a week ago - and I really think she 'got' it. I guess we'll see.

    Seems obvious - but for many of us (myself included) it was a new way at looking at everything. I'm very grateful it seems to work for me. With God's help of course. I'm not in charge. I used to be. Not anymore : ).

  16. #16
    Senior Member wingnut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Chicago 'burbs
    Posts
    92
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I have been jumping on the scale each day since the beginning of the year and had been getting bummed on the results. Made the decision this morning to stop doing this and only weigh myself once or twice a week. I'm working out at a club 4-5 times a week and getting a ride in when the weather and daylight are agreeable.

    I'm happy with what I'm doing...un-happy with the weight loss. This thread was perfect timing for me today. I'm working out and watching what I eat so I'm giving the scale a break.

    Thanks!

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    479
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm not sure how NFL players and cycling are related I can't even imagine a 300+ lbs lineman on a 2 1/2 lb frame it would be wasted. but big fat guys can work and condition themselves to some level of fitness. I was at a redskins training camp some years back and at lunch these guys have trays of food piled 8- 12 inches high. I'm talking 2500-3000+calories for one meal. thats obscene. cycling is an almost perfect exercise. It's low impact and works several muscle groups. I think bulking up for cycling is insane. but that said I do believe that some strengh training is beneficial and thats why I workout on a home gym. Not to bulk up but to tone up especially upper body muscles that don't benefit a lot from cycling. there is a benefit to using these muscles and it has to do with your body's ability to metabolize energy , kreb's cycle and the effect of lactate on your muscles just to scratch the surface. if you can train your anerobic pathway and aerobic pathway and develop the ability to keep the acids from flushing your muscles,that cause muscle shut down, Bonking, then it's much better that ravaging muscle and having to recover.
    I do agree the word "Diet" is a misnomer in todays world it means strick expensive plans that don't work well and most people gain most of this weight back. you have to enjoy food but understand what it takes to burn a calorie. "Diet" really is what you eat and changing your lifestyle means modifying what you eat not starving yourself. eliminate the sugary,high fructose corn syrup, simple carbs blood roller coaster junk , and eat good stuff and you will feel the difference and only use a scale if it motivates you.
    Last edited by onRoffR; 01-21-06 at 04:25 PM.

  18. #18
    Peloton Dog patentcad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Chester, NY
    My Bikes
    2013 Scott Foil, 2009 Scott Addict R2, 2008 Cervelo P3 TT bike, 2008 Motobecane Fly Ti Hard Tail MTB
    Posts
    55,994
    Mentioned
    25 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I only bring up NFL players because even the participants that seem 'fit' - say a 250lb. linebacker or a 210 lb. free safety - are carrying around so much extra weight in the form of muscle that once their playing days are over - and they advance into middle age - they're MUCH better off losing that weight and staying thin. I know a couple of guys who were accomplished college football players who went on to become successful professionals - and both slimmed down from 230-250lbs. to well under 200lbs (they're 6' and 6'2" respectively). And they weren't at all fat in their college days. But bulky. And once your crushing-the-halfback days or over the 50lbs of excess rippling muscle isn't going to get you anything but a heart condition in the long run.

    Those 'ideal weight charts' certainly don't fit everyone - but they do seem to fit 90% of us. So exceed those reccommendations at your own peril I suppose.

  19. #19
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Saratoga, CA
    Posts
    11,495
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, there was a linebacker at the OTC when our team was there and he actually produced the best muscle-efficiency readings they've ever tested! His legs produced the highest amounts of power for the least amount of oxygen-consumed than any of us bikers. But... his much, much higher mass mean that he had to also produce a lot more power to keep up, and his lung-capacity and aerobic system can't match a bikers.

    Those BMI weight-charts are completely bogus because they don't account for body-fat percentage.

  20. #20
    Peloton Dog patentcad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Chester, NY
    My Bikes
    2013 Scott Foil, 2009 Scott Addict R2, 2008 Cervelo P3 TT bike, 2008 Motobecane Fly Ti Hard Tail MTB
    Posts
    55,994
    Mentioned
    25 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    >>Those BMI weight-charts are completely bogus because they don't account for body-fat percentage.<<

    But you're missing the point of the weight charts. They're for overall health outlook - and your cardiovascular system probably doesn't differentiate all THAT much between muscle and fat with respect to the load on your system. If the weight charts say your ideal weight is 165 - and you're 195 - muscle OR fat, your cardio system has to support that extra tissue. And sooner or later (maybe not when you're 25 or 35, but once you advance into middle age) that's a potential negative health factor. That's all those charts really exist for - to establish those benchmarks.

    I'm sure heavier people (muscular or fat) have a higher percentage of heart disease and stroke issues. Which is kind of that point of that weight charts in the first place. I seriously doubt our ancient ancestors had these problems. They were too busy walking around hunting and gathering to bulk up : ).

    Do those weight charts cover 100% of the individuals out there? Of course not. But if you apply them to most of the people you know or meet, you'll find they're generally accurate. And you'll also find that most people exceed their recommendations. Which pisses some people off enough to call them 'totally bogus'. Oh well. It's your body. Bulk right up dude.

  21. #21
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Saratoga, CA
    Posts
    11,495
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, the mistaken assumption in the BMI is that the cardiovascular system of two people at 200lbs is the same and that it has the same load in supplying a 50% body-fat person as a 10% body-fat person. However, in reality, the cardiovascular system of an athlete at 10% body-fat is most likely clearly superior and more developed than the sedentary couch-potatoe with 50% body-fat. Heart-stroke volume can be tremendously different, as is resting HR, and blood-pressure and LDL/HDL levels. Yet their BMI is both the same, even though one person may be healthy with very little likelihood of heart-disease while the other person will most likely die in the next 10-years of it.

    Good job on the weight-loss BTW!

  22. #22
    Peloton Dog patentcad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Chester, NY
    My Bikes
    2013 Scott Foil, 2009 Scott Addict R2, 2008 Cervelo P3 TT bike, 2008 Motobecane Fly Ti Hard Tail MTB
    Posts
    55,994
    Mentioned
    25 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    It also gets harder to carry excess muscle around as you get older and your percentage of fat to muscle naturally gets worse....

  23. #23
    Senior Member Joe1946's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Millstone,NJ,US
    My Bikes
    Surly Pugsley,Mongoose Hybrid, Nashbar road bike
    Posts
    308
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I am 6 ft tall and I got up to about 210 or so at age 32 in 1979 and started biking about 100 mile a week and dropped to 150 lbs by April 1981. Then over the past 24 years I gained it all back after cutting back on my biking so at the end of last October I started biking about six days a week and dropped to 185 today. My goal is 169 by my 60th birthday on September 7th and maybe 150 before I hit 61 but my main goal is to get up the hills faster than I ever have.

    I cut back on processed foods and eat more fish and whole foods (fresh fruits,veggies etc) but I don't refuse a good piece of meat once a week or so. After about three weeks I purchased a scale and keep a daily log and i feel it's been a good motivator for me since I also used it the first time I dropped from 210 to 150 . But getting up the hills better and faster feels even better.

    Joe

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •