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  1. #1
    squareone
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    Carmichael 'Ultimate Ride' Field Test

    In yet another attempt at estimating heart rate training zones, I just completed the CTS Field Test - two 8-mile TTs. Would my theoretical LT in any way resemble my average HR over these two efforts?

  2. #2
    Senior Member rule's Avatar
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    This from CTS's website in the FAQ's section:

    Q. Does the CTS Field test tell me my lactate threshold heart rate/power?

    A. No. The only way to determine your true lactate threshold heart rate is through a performance test that includes blood sampling. At the same time, lab-based lactate threshold tests are invasive and expensive, and our research with thousands of elite and amateur athletes has shown the data from CTS Field Tests to consistently correlate with lactate threshold test data. Our calculations for training intensities take this correlation into account to ensure you’re training at the appropriate levels for maximum improvement.



    So in answer to your question, yes according to CTS. Use the formulas given to apply your field test data in order to determine your training intensity targets.

  3. #3
    CAT 2 wanna be PolishPostal's Avatar
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    Actually they are supposed to be 3mile TT's.

  4. #4
    Back in the saddle Sponge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PolishPostal
    Actually they are supposed to be 3mile TT's.
    Outdoors...those of us stuck indoors on trainers they prescribe 2x8minutes.

    I did mine on Saturday how did yours go PolishPostal?

  5. #5
    Banned.
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    I did it awhile back and found that the graphs and explinations were not sufficient. It leads you to believe you can determine your lactate threshold when you read the back of the book.

    The graph is an example of someone not what to compare yourself to.

    BTW-I am in the super-cyldesdale category and I did 3 miles in 9:30 with a heartrate of 144. I've got some room for improvement.

  6. #6
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    Would someone please explain how you take the CTS Field Test, and how you interpret the results? Thanks!

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    This is from a posting here:

    Quote Originally Posted by ho hum
    Can you describe how is the CTS test performed?

    Okay, here goes:

    1. Find and mark a 3 mile course that is level with light traffic.
    2. No solid food for 2 hours prior to the test.
    3. 16 oz. of high-carbohydrate sports drink immediately prior to the test (45 min).
    4. 10-20 min warm-up prior to timed ride that includes 2-3 high intensity efforts of 1-2 minutes in length. By end of warm up you should be physically warm, sweating and prepared for effort #1.
    5. Begin with standing start using gear that is not to easy or too heavy.
    6. Move to sitting position and shift into higher gear.
    7. Once up to speed, maintain cadence between 90-95 RPM.
    8. When you reach speed you feel you can barley maintain for the entire time settle into steady breating rhythm.
    9. Force pace all of the way!
    10. Collect time and AVERAGE heart rate for first effort.
    11. Recovery of 10 minutes at low intensity, high cadence.
    12. Repeat.
    13. Cool down 15-30 minutes.

    -------------------------------------

    To interpret data:

    185 BPM is 100 % (This is based on using data for over 1000 participants.)

    <65% is HR <120 VO2 max 20-35%
    65-85% is HR 120-153 VO2 max 35-50%
    85-88% is HR 153-163 VO2 max 50-65%
    88-95% is HR 163-176 VO2 max 65-80%
    95-100% is HR 176-185 VO2 max 80-85%
    >100% is HR >185 VO2 max 85-100%

    Data from Food for Fitness by: Chris Carmichael pp-29,387-389.
    Indoors, he recommends either 2x8 minutes or 3 miles, whichever you are comfortable with. The data above is interesting though...Make sure you use your average HR from both trials. The highest one is the number you want to use as your gauge.
    Cycling newb - learning and in training!
    2005 - Specialized Roubaix (Dream)

  8. #8
    squareone
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    Quote Originally Posted by PolishPostal
    Actually they are supposed to be 3mile TT's.
    Yes...you're right. I did 2x3miles - the original post was a typo.

    Thanks

  9. #9
    CAT 2 wanna be PolishPostal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sponge
    ... how did yours go PolishPostal?

    I did the 3 mile TT in 7min 45 sec (with a slight headwind). Avg HR - 166bpm

  10. #10
    Senior Member rule's Avatar
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    Keep in mind that in order to really evaluate your fitness and structure your training, you need to do both efforts with the prescribed recovery interval in between. You can get some really valuable information by comparing the data from the first interval to the data from the second, and also by looking at how well you were able to recover in between. Like despite going all out max in both efforts, if there is a big drop off from your first effort to your second, it may indicate that you haven't put enough training time into building your aerobic base, and you can structure your training accordingly. If your heart rate is consistent in both efforts but your power/output drops off, it can indicate that your aerobic base is good enough, but that you can benefit from lactic threshold training so that you can sustain your power output longer at that heart rate and exertion level. You can structure your training to do more to develop your ability to sustain those harder efforts longer into your rides, with good results.

    Just make sure that you are riding full out efforts both times. If you aren't, you aren't doing your field test properly. If you do, you may not like the results, but they can tell you quite a bit about how to structure your training in order to make progress. Properly done, what you are looking for are good fairly consistent efforts from both intervals, with good heart rate and physiological recovery in between. When you see that, then you are in a good position to use the heart rate or power data to structure your training for your given period of the season and going forward. Down the road, like in about 8 to 12 weeks, you can do another and evaluate your progress. If you prepare and conduct the field tests consistently, you can use a comparison of the results to tell you a lot about who well you are structuring your training.

    Hope this helps.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Richard Cranium's Avatar
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    Not sure where I saw this, but I think one article said it would be good idea to do a couple of "practice" TTs a week ahead of the "true test".

    The purpose of the "practice" runs is to familiarize the "testee" with the time, distance and optimal gearing for the TT. Of course, these practices are not supposed to be all-out efforts.

    As previously noted, "consistentcy" of testing is key to getting meaningful results.

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