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Old 02-04-06, 09:15 PM   #1
abmo
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heart rate question

I haven't been doing much riding for the last few months. I went out yesterday wearing a Polar heart rate monitor when I pushed it I went up to 190 bps. Is that high for someone in his low 30's
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Old 02-04-06, 09:23 PM   #2
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It depends on what your maximum is. My maximum is near 220 but I'm 15. I actually reached 218 on a ride one day and I added a couple beats because of the fact that you can push your body farther than you think. Even taking my age into account, that is still pretty high. The furthest I can push my body on any normal day is to about 200 even. So it all depends on your maximum because, no matter what you might have heard about 220-age, it's terribly innacurate.
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Old 02-04-06, 10:02 PM   #3
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nah, I'm 38 and my max is about 204, and has been for 20 years
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Old 02-04-06, 11:18 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abmo
I haven't been doing much riding for the last few months. I went out yesterday wearing a Polar heart rate monitor when I pushed it I went up to 190 bps. Is that high for someone in his low 30's
That's not high at all for someone your age. When I really push I can get it just about that high at 189. But I'm 57.
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Old 02-05-06, 11:50 AM   #5
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seeing as max HR is genetically determined, with small changes due to age.
your max doesn't change with activity or inactivity. how quickly you get up there and be unable to recover into an aerobic zone, now that is another story.
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Old 02-21-06, 06:59 AM   #6
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Just my $0.02 worth....

Using the Polar unit I have found that I have been - often - outside of my training zone. Using guidelines suggested by my Doctor - 220 less my age - I found my maximum heart rate. Then set the 65% and 85% figures in..my training zone.

Interstingly, I have logged and watched my heart rates fall since using the computer and training harder/more.

220 less the age of 30 years calculates out to around 190. Sounds like you are at your maximum heart rate at this point. The training zone would be between the 65% and 85% of the 190...

Whilst I understand that the Polar unit and the way I have determined my maximum heart rate is not 100%, it's better than waiting until I get a pain in the chest and then slowing down.

Besides all that it gives me something to look at and play with whilst I'm riding..

Bernie

Last edited by Bernie Knight; 02-21-06 at 07:05 AM.
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Old 02-21-06, 04:02 PM   #7
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It depends on what you want to do while you are exercising. I'm in a program at the local Lifetime gym that teaches you the different zones your heart rate is in and what they are doing. My AT (ananerobic threshold) is around 160, when you start having trouble talking. From 144 - 160, Zone 3, I am burning more fat than sugar. Below that, Zone 2, I'll burn equal sugar and fat. Above 160 - 174, Zone 4, you'll start burning more sugar than fat, and Zone 5, above 174 it is all sugar. It is very hard to stay in Zone 4 or 5 very long, but necessary once in a while to push yourself. It shocks your system which forces your body to improve performance to handle it. If you are looking for weight loss and long endurance, work out within 5 of your AT most of the time.

I'm not an expert, just relaying what I remember from the class. I believe your 190 is in Zone 4 or 5. How long can you stay there? I'm 38 and ride 50 miles a week in the winter and over 100 in the summer. My AT will increase as I get in better shape toward spring, but I doubt it will climb above 170.

Mark
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