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  1. #1
    RacingBear UmneyDurak's Avatar
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    Need training suggestion

    Hi.
    So here is my story. I haven't really been riding most of the fall (too busy). I started training in January, but most of it was on a trainer about an hour a day in the endurance zone. I went for a 50 mile ride today, and hills killed me! I want to do some racing this season. Mainly RR, although I do want to do RR/Crit weekend in March. I know at this point my chances of being competitive in Cat 5 field are slim to none, but I still want to do it for experience.
    By the time I get off work it's dark so most of my "riding" will be on a trainer, unless I can find some kind of ride that is near me (not likely I live in the middle of bay area "city" so suburbs for miles). Even then it will be flat. Any suggestions? I was thinking of continuing doing indurance on a trainer, maybe one interval night, and on weekends hit those hills.

    Thanks.
    I see hills.... Bring them on!!!
    Stay calm and bring a towel.

  2. #2
    Time to ride yet?
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    I'm in about the same situation. What I've started doing is more intervals on the trainer using the CTS Climbing video. Plus I found about a half mile long hill in a business complex not far from my house. So when I get in from work there's practically no body there and it is well lit so I can do some short hill intervals when it starts to get dark. Trainer time sucks...especially if you've been on it all winter. But it's just temporary, because warmer weather is around the corner. Good luck!
    2003 Bianchi San Lorenzo
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  3. #3
    Used to be a climber.. GuitarWizard's Avatar
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    I HIGHLY suggest the CTS Interval DVD's....I have the Climbing, Time Trial, Mountain Biking, and Criterium DVD's, and they work well. Do them 1 to 2 times a week, along with 1 or 2 moderate rides and an easy spin one day, and you'll notice some good improvements.

    FWIW, start off with the Climbing one if you're a bit out of shape, as that one is the "easiest" to begin with. The Time Trial and Mountain Biking are hard in their own way, but the Criterium one just plain kicks your ass. It's a great workout.
    1999 Trek 2500 - hit by a car on it in May, 2011 and currently bikeless

  4. #4
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    3 quick points:

    1. You shouldn't go from no-riding straight into interval-training. You have to build up your base fitness first. You do that by doing long endurance rides. Cyclists getting ready for Spring racing will do their base miles in November/December, and start shortening the distances, but increasing the intensity in January/February.

    2. Pack racing skills are as important as fitness. Drafting, cornering, bike-handling skills, pace-lining, positioning and group dynamics are 50% of the racing equation. So, you need to find a cycling club, team, or group to ride with and learn these things from.

    3. Training has evolved into a complex and at the same time formulated science called "periodization", which is too complicated to explain in a couple of sentences on a message board like this. A great source for learning how to train is to read a book like Joe Friel's The Cyclist's Training Bible. It helps you understand the science behind training. And, most importantly, it helps you set up an actual training plan so that you aren't riding aimlessly. You plan out your entire riding year. Each training ride has a specific purpose during any particular week, and each week has a purpose during any particular month, and each month has specific purpose during any particular training cycle. (Obviously you make adjustments to your plan as you go depending on how you, personally, are responding to the program because not everyone responds to training in the same way, and we each have individual strengths and weaknesses.)

    Plan your rides. Ride your plan. Understand that the learning curve is quick as far as racing skills and tactics are concerned. But the fitness curve is slow, especially as your fitness improves. Don't expect instantaneous results.

    Bob

  5. #5
    Senior Member late's Avatar
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    Hi,
    I did the same thing last year! I used the trainer, just pedaling away while watching old Star trek shows. Then spring came, I hit my first hill and nearly died.

    So I got some Spinervals DVDs (I think Nashbar has them on sale right now). They have intervals like the CTS ones. Once a week I either go to a spinning class, do a Spinerval, or when the weather is nice I even ride. Last winter was too miserable to ride.

    Then a couple times a week I just do the trainer with a Battlestar Galactica dvd. I have found a tv show you really like
    works great. You get caught up in the show, and then when it's over you are dripping in sweat, but it's that steady rate of output you want on a day where you aren't training hard.

    If you have a spinning class in your area, you might try that. I'd call Spinervals (actually I did call them) and ask for suggestions for a couple of their dvds. You can then order them from Nashbar and don't forget there is a net coupon for another 10%.

    You will want a more sophisticated training program than mine. Btw, I ride as long as it's above freezing. You can get up early ( I start my bike commute by 6AM) and get in some training time before the day's other demands grab you.
    Some weekends I roll at 6, so the riding doesn't eat the whole day. It's hard getting up earlier than you are used to. But I find I feel better the rest of the day when I do it.
    Last edited by late; 02-13-06 at 06:55 AM.

  6. #6
    Don't Believe the Hype RiPHRaPH's Avatar
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    listen to Bobby Lex.

    You need to know that your climbing is a combination of power (which you aren't going to keep through the winter and need some road miles to build back up) AND balance /handling that you can't get on a trainer.

    Don't freak. You are in a good position for the peak season. Periodization. work towards it.
    I have enough words to get me into trouble, but not enough to get me out of trouble.

  7. #7
    RacingBear UmneyDurak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobby Lex
    3 quick points:

    1. You shouldn't go from no-riding straight into interval-training. You have to build up your base fitness first. You do that by doing long endurance rides. Cyclists getting ready for Spring racing will do their base miles in November/December, and start shortening the distances, but increasing the intensity in January/February.
    Right, so I was thinking of continue riding in endurance zone untill beginning of March, then start to encrease intensity.
    On weekends I was thinking of doing a group ride. It will push me outside the HR zone, but I don't think it should have an adverse effect. Am I wrong?
    2. Pack racing skills are as important as fitness. Drafting, cornering, bike-handling skills, pace-lining, positioning and group dynamics are 50% of the racing equation. So, you need to find a cycling club, team, or group to ride with and learn these things from.
    I used to be in a Cycling club before I moved, so I'm not exactly new to pack riding.
    3. Training has evolved into a complex and at the same time formulated science called "periodization", which is too complicated to explain in a couple of sentences on a message board like this. A great source for learning how to train is to read a book like Joe Friel's The Cyclist's Training Bible. It helps you understand the science behind training. And, most importantly, it helps you set up an actual training plan so that you aren't riding aimlessly. You plan out your entire riding year. Each training ride has a specific purpose during any particular week, and each week has a purpose during any particular month, and each month has specific purpose during any particular training cycle. (Obviously you make adjustments to your plan as you go depending on how you, personally, are responding to the program because not everyone responds to training in the same way, and we each have individual strengths and weaknesses.)

    Plan your rides. Ride your plan. Understand that the learning curve is quick as far as racing skills and tactics are concerned. But the fitness curve is slow, especially as your fitness improves. Don't expect instantaneous results.
    Bob
    I understand that it's a multy year commitment. I have that book, but haven't had chance to read it. Will need to make time, to read it.

    Thanks.
    I see hills.... Bring them on!!!
    Stay calm and bring a towel.

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