Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 02-15-06, 07:19 PM   #1
NASH4845
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
NASH4845's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Pittsburgh
Bikes: Custom Trek
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Is the Speed on my computer accurate

Sorry if this question has been asked before which I am sure it has. Just inquiring about the accuracy of my rear wheel speed while on the trainer. Im using the CycleOps Magneto. Speed seems really low for the power im displacing. Thanks
NASH4845 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-06, 08:11 PM   #2
GuitarWizard
Used to be a climber..
 
GuitarWizard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: East Baldwin, ME
Bikes: 2016 Ridley Fenix SL, 2013 PedalForce RS3-ISP, 2015 Trek 520 Disc
Posts: 6,834
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Heh.....one thing I noticed when transitioning from riding outside to riding on a trainer (I have the Fluid 2, which has more resistance than the Magneto), is "Holy crap, it's harder maintaining x amount of speed for y amount of time". To me, it sorta felt like I was continually riding up a slight hill.....but, after I became accustomed to this, and in better shape, my speed increased. I'm actually faster outdoors than indoors.....although I did hit my new "average speed" indoor record of 18 mph for nearly 2 hours the other week. My previous best was 17.5 mph for 3 hours. Yeah, I have no life.

But...your cyclocomputer settings are based on your wheelsize, which you punch in when you first set up your computer, so a trainer will have no effect on producing a lower/higher number than you would riding outdoors.
GuitarWizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-06, 09:28 PM   #3
NASH4845
Junior Member
Thread Starter
 
NASH4845's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Pittsburgh
Bikes: Custom Trek
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Consider that while on a trainer the bike has no momentum. As soon as you stop pedaling on a trainer the rear wheel loses speed and comes to a complete halt much sooner than while riding outdoors. I agree with the above statement that it is harder to sustain speed for a set amount of time on a trainer than riding outdoors. For the record i dont know if stating that the fluid trainer has more resistance than the magneto. From what i have read the difference is the smoothness of the resisitance and the range of resistance. If your maintaining 18mph I have some work to do.
NASH4845 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-06, 09:43 PM   #4
GuitarWizard
Used to be a climber..
 
GuitarWizard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: East Baldwin, ME
Bikes: 2016 Ridley Fenix SL, 2013 PedalForce RS3-ISP, 2015 Trek 520 Disc
Posts: 6,834
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you go to the CycleOps site and compare the trainers, you'll see that the Fluid 2 actually has more resistance built into it. However, looking at the charts, you're riding with more resistance at a lower speed than I am on the Fluid 2.....BUT, looking at another chart I posted up in another thread on a Fluid 2 with actual watts vs. gear/cadence combos, the two charts seem to differ. So....who really knows.
GuitarWizard is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:42 AM.