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  1. #1
    Senior Member dta95b7r's Avatar
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    Watching news.. Red dye in the beef?!

    The other day I was watching the news and they had a segment on beef. Turns out alot of supermarket beef has dye in it to make it red so people will buy it. It seems the FDA has no problem with it?! They say looks has nothing to do with quality of the beef and shouldn't be used to determine its quality! The news then talked with a butcher at a supermarket who like the idea! because people were buying cuts of meat they usually wouldn't try. Am I the only one who feels that this is terrible? I just don't understand how they can talk about it like its not a big deal. They also showed a comparison of two different slices of meat one normal cut and another with the dye, the normal cut had the early aging(slight browning) while the dyed look like someone just took a hatchet to a cow. They justified it by saying you should go by the expiration date. I just think this is bs what do you all think?
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  2. #2
    Rides again HiYoSilver's Avatar
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    Not just dye, they are also injecting with CO2 to give meat red color for weeks.
    Hi 'o Silver away

  3. #3
    contrarian lala's Avatar
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    That's gross.
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    Senior Member Jarery's Avatar
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    Its crap.
    And anothe reason why organic beef has been increasing by 20% a year. And natural beef is increasing at a similar rate, and soon will get its own certification so that the term 'natural' actually means something.

    People are getting tired of getting lied to and companies relying on fooling tactics to get you to buy their products. Those who never educate themselves into food wont ever know about the dye. But those who try to learn about their food will most likely switch to a higher priced, but less chemical infested brand, but usually only if its convenient enough and not priced too much higher.

    Just like farmed salmon, they put red dye in the feed so the salmon comes out red instead of grey. In fact, farmed salmon from scotland is so bad these days its recomended to only have no more than 3 servings a year.
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  5. #5
    more ape than man timmhaan's Avatar
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    to me the red dyed meat just doesn't look right. the appeal is lost on me. it's obviously been modified to look like that so i tend to stay away. i cut way down on meat, and when i do buy it, i buy certified organic. it's more money, but it tastes a lot better.

  6. #6
    The Other White Meat BroMax's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HiYoSilver
    Not just dye, they are also injecting with CO2 to give meat red color for weeks.


    I recently read that Kroger has decided to stop using CO (carbon monoxide)
    to give meat that deceptively fresh look.

    It seems backwards that ground beef should look pink and fresh on the outside and not quite so pink and fresh on the inside. After all the outside is exposed to the air. If you've ever had the butcher run meat through the grinder (or ground your own) you'd see that in the ordinary course of things, it is the outside, not the inside that turns brown.

  7. #7
    Senior Member dta95b7r's Avatar
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    Its sad really, I have worked as chef and sous chef in several restaurants. And the meat that we would get delivered and trim in house didn't look as red as the stuff in the market. As for the farm raised salmon that stuff is just aweful, its truly amazing the stuff they get away with in the food industry
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  8. #8
    contrarian lala's Avatar
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    Ugh...yes, I've progressively gone towards wild and organic-type meats.
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  9. #9
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    Here's a news flash: The oranges are also dyed, the apples have a wax coating, and the bananas have been gassed with ethylene to speed their ripening.

    There's food grade dyes in many foods, including soda and sports drink. So, there's nothing new here and no reason to be alarmed. So long as the meat is handled correctly and the store doesn't relabel old meat (can you say, "Food Lion"?) it's not an issue.

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    Quote Originally Posted by supcom
    Here's a news flash: The oranges are also dyed, the apples have a wax coating, and the bananas have been gassed with ethylene to speed their ripening.

    There's food grade dyes in many foods, including soda and sports drink. So, there's nothing new here and no reason to be alarmed. So long as the meat is handled correctly and the store doesn't relabel old meat (can you say, "Food Lion"?) it's not an issue.
    Its definately an issue, manipulating food should not be legal. The US needs to adopt some some regulations Europe has put in place, they take their food much more serious than us (not overweight either, any correlation?)
    It is too bad we can not make steak tartar (raw ground beef with raw egg) like they do in france, it would be asking for trouble over here. Unless that is you were to get some good fresh farm raised organic free range...etc etc beef. I go out of my way to get this fresh beef, but we shouldnt have to, it should be available to the general public at a reasonable price-

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    Senior Member rick1's Avatar
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    The red dye is just the half of it. The feed lots of these big commerical agra farms are awful, hundreds of cattle penned together living in the own ####. They develop cuts and abrasions and disease follows, to keep disease under control their fed doses of Antibiotics which is also used as a growth enhancer as well as steriods. The USDA allows the feeding of sawdust, plastic chips, industrial waste, cement dust and dead animal parts to commerically raised animals. This causes the animals to pack on tremendous amounts of fat and more weight means more money. You say how? because the food manufactures have some pretty powerful and well funded lobbists in Washington these days. As Jarery stated organic beef sales is increasing 20% each year, there's a reason why.

  12. #12
    Sensible shoes. CastIron's Avatar
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    CO is used even more often in seafood. Given my location I've learned to ask when buying: Is it fresh-frozen or treated with CO? No way in heck I can get sashimi tuna steak fresh without going to Oceanaire and paying $$$ this far from the coast.

    BTW: CO isn't a dye and it isn't really a bad thing--except--when used to mask a products LACK of edible freshness. It's just another way the market is addressing consumer ignorance.
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    Banned. FXjohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lala
    Ugh...yes, I've progressively gone towards wild and organic-type meats.

    What are you talkiing about? You can't buy wild meat.
    You have to kill it yourself?
    Is that what you do?

  14. #14
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rick1
    The USDA allows the feeding of sawdust, plastic chips, industrial waste, cement dust and dead animal parts to commerically raised animals. This causes the animals to pack on tremendous amounts of fat and more weight means more money.
    Could you elaborate on how plastic chips, industrial waste, and cement dust allow an animal to put on fat? I can understand sawdust since cows have the enzymes necessary to break down cellulose (we don't) and see nothing morally wrong with that. Spent barley husks from brewery mash is another cellulose-laden "waste" product fed to cattle. I can also see how dead animal parts would put on fat. Come to think of it, a filet mignon is also a dead animal part. Dog food is full of dead animal parts as well, but neither my dog, nor I mind her eating it.

    Plastic and cement dust would seemingly be inert and simply pass through the animal's digestive track with no benefit or detriment. Industrial waste is a vague term. Sawdust and barley husks could be considered industrial waste. Do you have any specific waste products in mind?

  15. #15
    Banned. FXjohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by supcom
    Could you elaborate on how plastic chips, industrial waste, and cement dust allow an animal to put on fat? I can understand sawdust since cows have the enzymes necessary to break down cellulose (we don't) and see nothing morally wrong with that. Spent barley husks from brewery mash is another cellulose-laden "waste" product fed to cattle. I can also see how dead animal parts would put on fat. Come to think of it, a filet mignon is also a dead animal part. Dog food is full of dead animal parts as well, but neither my dog, nor I mind her eating it.

    Plastic and cement dust would seemingly be inert and simply pass through the animal's digestive track with no benefit or detriment. Industrial waste is a vague term. Sawdust and barley husks could be considered industrial waste. Do you have any specific waste products in mind?

    I wouldn't expect any REAL answers..

    Umm, It's not natural, someone said so...mm'kay?

  16. #16
    Senior Member rick1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by supcom
    Could you elaborate on how plastic chips, industrial waste, and cement dust allow an animal to put on fat? I can understand sawdust since cows have the enzymes necessary to break down cellulose (we don't) and see nothing morally wrong with that. Spent barley husks from brewery mash is another cellulose-laden "waste" product fed to cattle. I can also see how dead animal parts would put on fat. Come to think of it, a filet mignon is also a dead animal part. Dog food is full of dead animal parts as well, but neither my dog, nor I mind her eating it.

    Plastic and cement dust would seemingly be inert and simply pass through the animal's digestive track with no benefit or detriment. Industrial waste is a vague term. Sawdust and barley husks could be considered industrial waste. Do you have any specific waste products in mind?
    I suggest reading a few publications that contain all this info. "Safe Food" by Marion Nestle who formally worked for the Food Advisory Committee and the Food and Drug Administration and is now an Academic nutritionist with New York University. She also authored the Title "Food Politics" which deals about the ways in which food companies use the political system to achieve commerical goals. "Food Fight" by Kelly Brownell PH.D is the director of Yale center for eating and weight disorders and Fast Food nation by Eric Schlosser "the dark side of the All American meal".

  17. #17
    You need a new bike supcom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rick1
    I suggest reading a few publications that contain all this info. "Safe Food" by Marion Nestle who formally worked for the Food Advisory Committee and the Food and Drug Administration and is now an Academic nutritionist with New York University. She also authored the Title "Food Politics" which deals about the ways in which food companies use the political system to achieve commerical goals. "Food Fight" by Kelly Brownell PH.D is the director of Yale center for eating and weight disorders and Fast Food nation by Eric Schlosser "the dark side of the All American meal".
    I'll just take that as, despite your original assertion, you don't know how plastic chips, industrial waste, and cement dust allow an animal to put on fat.

  18. #18
    Back in black cydewaze's Avatar
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    The wife and I only get around 10% of our calories from meat products, so we can afford to buy organic, free-range meats.

    No red dye for us!

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    Banned. FXjohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by supcom
    I'll just take that as, despite your original assertion, you don't know how plastic chips, industrial waste, and cement dust allow an animal to put on fat.

    And you're not gonna tell him, so THERE

  20. #20
    Senior Member Jarery's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cydewaze
    The wife and I only get around 10% of our calories from meat products, so we can afford to buy organic, free-range meats.

    No red dye for us!
    Were the same. Our intake is low enough that the increased cost is minimal to an overall budget.

    My salmon budget is higher, but no way no how am I eating that farmed stuff they sell.
    The worst part is when i go to a large supermarket, the seafood section will have all these huge beautifull fillets all layed out on crushed ice. All farmed. Then off in the corner is 2 crumpled up old looking fillets, thats the wild salmon. Its no wonder people pay the 8 bucks a lb for farmed instead of 12 for wild.

    An article I read awhile back went thru and examined 15 seafood stores in NYC. Was like 12 of the 15 sellign 'wild' salmon for top dollar, were all selling farmed and just relabeling it.
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  21. #21
    Senior Member barba's Avatar
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    I think that the red dye is likely the least of your concerns. If you find that unsettling, I would avoid investigating things further or be prepared to go vegetarian or organic free-range meats exclusive.

    If you have ever been to a meat or chicken processing plant, it is not something you will easily forget. I have nothing against eating meat (as a matter of disclosure I am a vegetarian, but out of habit from my upbringing rather than deep conviction), but the shear amount of meat that we eat as a country encourages some pretty crazy stuff in the industrial scale farms.

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    Banned. FXjohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barba
    , but the shear amount of meat that we eat as a country encourages some pretty crazy stuff in the industrial scale farms.

    It's not how much meat we eat necessarily, it's the greed, and how much meat sellers will sacrifice to make more money when they sell it.

  23. #23
    contrarian lala's Avatar
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    I agree. I try to avoid meats unless they are free-range/organic. I try to do the same with all the foods.
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    Senior Member rick1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by supcom
    I'll just take that as, despite your original assertion, you don't know how plastic chips, industrial waste, and cement dust allow an animal to put on fat.
    When Animals or humans ingest toxic substances the body attempts to store these substances in the fat as to wall off toxins away from the nervous system and the vital organs. Many of these products are added to the grain or feed the animals ingest.

  25. #25
    Senior Member Kimbercop's Avatar
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    The majority of the red meat my family and I eat is venison, (yes I kill it, and butcher it too). Much healthier and I like knowing where the food I'm eating is coming from, (at least the meat). Not claiming to be an expert, just my .02
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