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Thread: Shin Splints?

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    Shin Splints?

    I have intermittent pain in my lowe legs that I think are shin splints. I have gotten them before from trying to be a runner but that was a long time ago and I may have forgotten what they feel like. Have any of you ever gotten Shin Splints from riding?

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    Pat
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    That is interesting. I have never had anything like that. I haven't even heard of anyone getting shin splints on a bike. Of course, just because I have not heard of it, doesn't mean that it can't happen. I find for most painful things, that lowering my gear and increasing my cadence helps.

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    Wood Licker Maelstrom's Avatar
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    I would double check to make sure they are shin splints. I have heard of it happening but only from freeriders who consistantly do drops which puts enough stress on the shins to damage them. Regular riding shouldn't do that kind of damage. I am a major sufferer of shin splint. I can't even run 100yards on pavement without my shins screaming and me falling to the ground. IT sounds more like muscle tear down / pain where your shin is getting stronger.

    If it is shin splints...wow...cycling is very low impact generally and shouldn't cause that kind of trauma to your shins.

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    Senior Member Cipher's Avatar
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    And here I thought I was the only one to ever experience shin splints from cycling. A few years back I had a 2 year lay-off from cycling. Once I resumed cycling, I concentrated on spinning, specifically with a full range of motion at my ankles. In no time at all I had shin splints! I layed off the extreme range of motion, iced my shins, took a little Advil, and about a week later was as good as new! (The wife is a Physical Therapist and said it definitly was shin splints). Go figure!
    Speed Kills...It kills those that don't have it!

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    Bring It! Sailguy's Avatar
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    I felt like I had the beginnings of shin splints recently, so I backed off on some of the intensity, and the pain went away. I am sure once I get a bit stronger it won't be as much of an issue.

    I hated getting them when I used to long jump.. ouch!
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    Gravity Is Yer Friend dirtbikedude's Avatar
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    Shin splint are, for the most part, a problem that runners have but they can also affest cyclists as well. Here is a little info on them. Not sure if it will help you but I shall give it any ways. The best cure for them is rest and then strengthen the muscles in the lower leg.

    One common cause of shin splints is posterior tibial syndrome (PTS).
    The exact cause of PTS is unknown. Some experts believe that it is caused by posterior compartment syndrome, which means there is increased pressure within the thick sleeve of tissue containing the deep muscles of the leg. Others believe that PTS is caused by periostitis, which means the periosteum (bone covering) of the tibia is inflamed where the muscles attach to it.

    Stress fractures
    The condition most commonly mistaken for PTS is a stress fracture. A stress fracture of the tibia is a crack that develops in the shin bone over time from repetitive stress on the bone. Normally, your muscles absorb the shock put on your legs during activity. When you continuously pound your legs during an activity, such as distance running, soccer, or basketball, your muscles tire, losing much of their ability to absorb shock. When your muscles do not absorb shock well, stress on the bone increases. The bone cannot endure the increased stress so it begins to crack. To help detect a stress fracture, your doctor may take x-rays or a bone scan. However, these fractures can be quite difficult to diagnose because they may not show up on x-rays when they first develop

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    a physio told me it is to do with that thick tissue tube you refer to - if it isnt warmed up properly, the something or other underneath it rubs against it and causes the discomfort of splints. the way to avoid this is to warm up properly, and/or massage the meaty poart of the fronmt of the shin to warm up the tube bit

    not very scientific but there we are
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