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  1. #1
    0^0 fubar5's Avatar
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    After a ride or weight training, I tend to feel "giddy" and weak. I have tried eating alot of carbs right after my exercise, I have tried eating carbs before, I have tried alot of things. The only thing I can think of is that maybe I am not getting enough rest. Or is the giddy and weak feeling something to be expected?
    Booyah!!

  2. #2
    Carfree since '82. Grrr! JonR's Avatar
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    I don't know about weight training, but definitely feeling giddy and weak after a ride is not what you should expect! There might be a few seconds of "dizziness" from the sudden change in motion, especially if the last part of the ride was fast, but you'd get the same thing spinning around in an office chair, or at a big-screen movie sometimes, and it should go right away. The weakness part is definitely wrong.

    Once DURING a forty-mile very-hot-weather ride, though, I started to conk out, definitely a blood-sugar problem, VERY weak, dizzy, clammy sweat: and I was able to stop and eat a cheeseburger and fries and continued happily on my way afterward, feeling fine.

    I wonder what kind of carbohydrates you're using to try to overcome this--isn't it true that a lot of refined sugar will sometimes only add to the problem?

  3. #3
    0^0 fubar5's Avatar
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    I think you are right. I read that carbs are not good for you if they come mostly from sugar. I am trying to find something on the net about it.
    Booyah!!

  4. #4
    Just ride. roadbuzz's Avatar
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    Well, there's weak, and there's weak.

    Do you feel exhausted, but good, like you just pushed yourself to the limit and now your legs are a little shakey, or do you feel drained and sickly, like you're about to pass out? The first one is normal, the second could be a problem (like maybe you aren't getting enough iron). If you have any doubts, talk to your doctor and get some blood tests.

  5. #5
    Love Me....Love My Bike! aerobat's Avatar
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    If it's a fairly long ride, over an hour or so, try eating during it as well. Just some sort of energy bar, or even an orange might do the trick.
    "...perhaps the world needs a little more Canada" - Jean Chretian, 2003.

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    Carfree since '82. Grrr! JonR's Avatar
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    Originally posted by aerobat
    If it's a fairly long ride, over an hour or so, try eating during it as well. Just some sort of energy bar, or even an orange might do the trick.
    Very good point! The body doesn't wait till end of the trail to decide it wants fuel. I suspect that it's the same as with water--best to consume it before you feel the need.

  7. #7
    Love Me....Love My Bike! aerobat's Avatar
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    Right on Jon. I was just going to go back and make this post when the email alert of your post came in.

    Make sure you drink enough water, especially at this time of the year. The symptoms you describe could be dehydration or even early signs of heat stroke, so be very careful about taking water with you and using it.

    I'm not a doctor and I don't play one on TV or anywhere else.
    "...perhaps the world needs a little more Canada" - Jean Chretian, 2003.

  8. #8
    Just Follow Your Feet! AlphaGeek's Avatar
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    In general, when you are thirsty, you are probably well on your way to dehydration. Drink plenty of water, let's face it, most of humanity doesn't drink enough (water that is...)! If you aren't a big fan of water, try filling your water bottle about 1/4 and lay the bottle on its side in the freezer the night before...The ice lasts longer and keeps the water cool.:cool:
    Recumbents rock!

  9. #9
    Mr. Cellophane RainmanP's Avatar
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    Yep, any book on intense exercise like running or cycling will stress drink early, drink often. Your body needs water long before the thirst response kicks in. So, as Aerobat said, once you feel thirsty, it is too late. Once behind you cannot catch up because your body just cannot get the water into your system as fast as it is flowing out through every pore. So for long rides you need to hydrate before and start taking sips as soon as you start riding. I believe the rule of thumb is about 2 bottles per hour. Maybe a little more in hotter weather, no less in cool weather. On a half hour ride, you might be able to get away with not drinking at all, but it wouldn't be good for you. I can tell you from personal experience that a 20 mile ride on one bottle of water will leave you hurting by the end. Since that particular ride, I now have 4 bottle cages on my bike. One for my battery, two bottles of water for my regular commutes, and space for a spare for longer rides. One is mounted on the downtube in the usual spot. One is on the seat tube with a plastic clamp made for the purpose. Two are hose-clamped out to the sides on the upper part of the down tube where they don't interfere with no. 1. I wrapped a piece of inner tube to protect the paint etc. There may be a small aerodynamic penalty for such mounting, but I don't plan to race this bike. I actually use the upper right one for the bottle I am using and switch when it is empty. I find that position very easy to reach. I am also forcing myself to get the bottle, drink, and return it while pedaling at a good clip just to get comfortable with doing it.
    If it ain't broke, mess with it anyway!

  10. #10
    Sumanitu taka owaci LittleBigMan's Avatar
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    Originally posted by fubar5
    After a ride or weight training, I tend to feel "giddy" and weak.
    First, I agree that if it's a problem for you, get a medical checkup.
    Even a doctor won't diagnose your problem online.

    Second, the suggestions about eating right and drinking enough water are good things to practice. That's why we're your buddies,
    we like to help.

    Third, I have felt like that from adrenaline. It causes exhiliration and muscular trembling/weak feeling. It's natural and normal as long as (as another poster put it) it's just a slight feeling and not overwhelming.

    You may also find this can occur when your blood sugar bottoms out. That is also normal. If you're sensitive to sugars, orange juice beats coke by a mile. Plus orange juice has tons of vitamin C for rebuilding muscle tissue and potassium, an electrolyte.

    Remember, when you cycle you are burning more glucose than fat, and this effect is magnified the harder/faster you ride. Don't depend heavily on non-carbohydrate fuels to sustain you. You can not convert body fat back into glucose. Only muscle tissue can be sacrificed to get glucose once your stores are gone. Keep a balance, and remember to replenish you body's carbohydrate stores as soon as possible after a ride, along with protein.
    Last edited by LittleBigMan; 05-23-01 at 02:16 PM.

  11. #11
    0^0 fubar5's Avatar
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    The feeling is a "shaky feeling" and it lasts for a while actually. I think it does have something to do with the blood sugar bottoming out.I have been taking multi-vitamins everyday, so I don't think I'm low in Iron. I tried doing a lot of stretching after my exercise the other day and it helped tremendously. I am going to start eating something during my ride/weight lifting as someone mentioned.
    I don't feel sickly or exhausted. Sometimes I even feel more energized, but shaky. It may be that I am not eating enough to recover. It's hard to say.
    Booyah!!

  12. #12
    Sumanitu taka owaci LittleBigMan's Avatar
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    You're my buddy, Fubar. Keep cycling!

  13. #13
    Just ride. roadbuzz's Avatar
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    From the way you describe it, it does sound a lot like a blood sugar thing. The advice about eating during rides is good, but remember, you're eating for later. What I'm trying to say is that it takes a good 1/2 hour or more before your body can turn the food into energy. Personally, when I'm doing a recreational ride, say, after work, I drink extra water during the afternoon, and eat some kind of complex carbohydrate (like an orange, or a Nutri-grain type breakfast bar) 1/2 an hour or so before starting. That way, the initial work of digestion will be complete before starting, when all the blood gets sucked away from my innards down to my legs. Then, as has already been mentioned, eat during the ride (stuff that's easy to digest... bananas are cheap and work well).

  14. #14
    0^0 fubar5's Avatar
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    Good info roadbuzz. I am going to review what a complex carbo is. Thanks for all the helps guys!
    Booyah!!

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