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Old 03-21-06, 12:53 PM   #1
Big R
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Lactate v. Anaerobic Threshholds

I know there's been a lot on this already, but I'm still a bit confused.

Would someone please explain the difference between "lactate" and "anaerobic" threshholds, and how one might train differently depending on your focus?

Seems like the 2x20 anaerobic test, and the 30 minute time trial lactate test will yield substantially the same results.

THX

R
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Old 03-21-06, 02:15 PM   #2
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It's the same thing. However, I prefer the term OBLA (Onset of blood lactate accumulation); because lactate production is not some switch that goes from all the way off to on at some magic set point, like so many think. The threshold is where production and removal are matched.
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Old 03-22-06, 06:08 PM   #3
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Lactate Threshold refers to when lactate starts to acumulate because it cannot be removed fast enough.

Anerobic threshold occurs when you "go anerobic" i.e. you don't have enough oxygen to continue to exercise aerobicly and thus you start to increase lactate at a much higher rate.

In short, they're the same thing


P.S. I find the 2x20 anerobic test a much better way to determine LT than the 30 minute test
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Old 03-23-06, 06:59 AM   #4
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Two training concepts support increased ability to metabolize or otherwise perform work during lactate production.

One exercise dictates that you ride for a fairly long periods at an effort level very near, but just below your "lactate threshold". (a steady state effort) (2x20?)

The other exercise involves short periods of effort which are well above the threshold. The combination, length and intensity of these "interval" work periods varies with current fitness levels and particular athletes goals.

One exercise stresses the system to clear lactate while under load, the other repeatedly creates and then "clears lactate" during rest periods.

In both situations, athletes often work so hard that lactate accumulates through out the workout and they finish with considerable fatigue.

Many coaches believe it's critical to a training program to find the exact levels of effort that promote these lactate-tolerance adaptations without causing undo fatigue
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Old 03-23-06, 08:08 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Cranium
Two training concepts support increased ability to metabolize or otherwise perform work during lactate production.

One exercise dictates that you ride for a fairly long periods at an effort level very near, but just below your "lactate threshold". (a steady state effort) (2x20?)

The other exercise involves short periods of effort which are well above the threshold. The combination, length and intensity of these "interval" work periods varies with current fitness levels and particular athletes goals.

One exercise stresses the system to clear lactate while under load, the other repeatedly creates and then "clears lactate" during rest periods.
That makes perfect sense to me, but I wonder what to expect in terms of results. If I do workouts like those as much as I can manage without overdoing it (2, 3 per week maybe?), how long till I see real improvements? Yeah, I know, lots of variables and all, but there must be some average guideline. I'm a very average 38yr old afterall!

Thanks,
Don
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