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Training & Nutrition Learn how to develop a training schedule that's good for you. What should you eat and drink on your ride? Learn everything you need to know about training and nutrition here.

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Old 08-08-06, 12:52 PM   #1
Coyote2
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Best introductory training book?

Thread title says it all. Please give me your recommendations. I am looking for a fairly simple plan for prepping for occasional racing -- nothing designed for pros or that requires a PhD in sports physiology or etc.

Thanks in advance!
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Old 08-08-06, 04:22 PM   #2
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This would be my recommendation...lots of good info and understandable.
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Old 08-09-06, 12:49 AM   #3
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I use two. The first is Carmichael's The Ultimate Ride and the second is Edward and Reed's Heart Zone Cycling

They both kind of say the same thing, but Heart Zones Cycling gives a fairly simple way of designing workouts, while The Ultimate Ride gives a more complete picture into training.

They probably aren't for extreme competitive cycling, but they work well for advanced recreational training.
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Old 08-09-06, 07:06 AM   #4
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Several by Friel (road or mtb), Burke's Serious Cycling, Carmichael's Ultimate Ride, and I guess the Sally's book above but that requires an HRM. All of them sort of require an HRM, but you can get by without. RPE works, but you have to pay attention to yourself and be honest. There are also plenty of articles online which could probably get you by if you don't want a book.
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Old 08-09-06, 08:25 AM   #5
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I started out with Friel's book. But he completely neglects intensity in the base period. I think that you need some intensity during base.

I've been leaning more toward the methods of Dave Morris, "Performance Cycling : Training for Power, Endurance, and Speed"
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Old 08-09-06, 08:29 AM   #6
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Dave Morris is the one book I haven't bought yet, basically because I can't find it for sale anywhere. I thikn Amazon has 1 used copy for $55. No thanks!
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Old 08-09-06, 08:46 AM   #7
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Are there any good books for just general training? Most of them seem to focus exclusively on preparing for a race season, while I am just looking for how to continuously improve. I'm not looking to peak or anything like that.
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Old 08-09-06, 09:20 AM   #8
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Then don't bother with a book. All you need is online. A brief outline:

1. Ride your bike. On hills, flats, anywhere. Just ride.
2. Ride hills.
3. Do occasional intervals.
4. Learn how to eat properly.
5. Don't overtrain.
6. Cross train, or not. It's up to you.
7. Understand that an unmonitored/unstructured ride isn't going to help you improve a whole lot. Yes it might mean that you can have a burger for dinner. But next week's ride isn't going to be much easier because you aren't pushing your limiters.

It's really a mix & match procession from there.
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