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  1. #1
    Senior Member slim_77's Avatar
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    measuring "recovery" intake

    Is there a variable ratio between what you put into your body after a hard -- medium -- light workout? Obvisouly, your body has different needs and I can not imagine that a consistent amount of protein or carbs will yield a unifersally beneficial result...(am I making sense here?).

    Wouldn't body mass also be a factor? If som how? Or does it matter at all? If it does, what is/could be considered an overload?

    Thanks in advance!
    gravity: it's not just a good idea, it's the law.

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    I have been led to believe that glucose has a protein sparing effect in the body. I would imagine that the harder you have worked you muscles more glucose you will need to replenish the glycogen stores in your muscles to avoid catabolizing them. As for ratios I am not sure what would be needed. I would bet that if the ratios were to stay the same the amount you would need to ingest would increase, this being because you need more glucose to replenish the grater store of glycogen that you used up, and more protein to repair the additional muscle strain.

    That being said I think it would also be dependant on what you ate during your ride.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Richard Cranium's Avatar
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    Is there a variable ratio between what you put into your body after a hard -- medium -- light workout?
    Sure. Your recovery diet varies with the deficits created by your workouts.

    The intensity and duration of your workouts determine the importance of your recovery process. The harder, the more exhausting the workout, the more important it is to "hit" the right mix and ratio of recovery fuels. Low intensity workouts simply require a mix or water and calories.

    Experienced athletes plan for their recovery fueling by having easy-to-use premixed protein containing fuels standing by right at the end of their workouts. After some quality fuels have been consumed, they move of to "normal", on the table food stuffs in whatever mix they "feel" fits their caloric requirements.

    Very few athletes get beyond this type stratagy, although I would imagine in a laboratory study could find a relationship of optimum fuel content balances. MY own suspicion would be that workouts that have caused more dehydration would benefit from recovery fuel ratios that increase carbohydrate. Cold weather workouts, or workouts with severe resistance but less dehydration can tolerate the "classic" 3 or 4-to-1 protein/carb ratio.

    Great question, no great answers......

  4. #4
    Senior Member slim_77's Avatar
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    Great responces...

    So depending upon how serious or casual an athlete you are, the proper ratio and qualtity should be discovered via a normal trail--error--correction--solution process.

    I suppose it is safe to say that whatever the body does not need for recovery can be stored and used later. Being fit and working out regularly would prevent the set of problems that could arise from excess. Also, being athletes we have a pretty good sense of what "feels" right...so, go with your gut...(sorry, just had to).

    Thanks!
    gravity: it's not just a good idea, it's the law.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by slim_77
    Is there a variable ratio between what you put into your body after a hard -- medium -- light workout? Obvisouly, your body has different needs and I can not imagine that a consistent amount of protein or carbs will yield a unifersally beneficial result...(am I making sense here?).

    Wouldn't body mass also be a factor? If som how? Or does it matter at all? If it does, what is/could be considered an overload?
    Mass and effort are going to effect the overall amount of the recovery, but at the end of a workout, your somewhat limited by how much your body can absorb.

    I use a single serving of Endurox, which is somewhere around 250 calories, right when I finish the workout. That will get me through a shower and getting dressed, then I'll have something else based on how I feel.
    Eric

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