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  1. #1
    Senior Member slim_77's Avatar
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    anaerobic endurance question

    This question relates to building my anaerobic endurance because I am interested in racing (in the indefinite future). I have the Polar CS100 and have placed my recent LT at 168-169 bpm. I generally put in roughly 4-10 hard hours per week on the bike (indoor and out--weather permitting), although this by and large depends upon work. I have read many interesting posts regarding HR and LT training but have a question relating to a hilly 40m race and a shorter 10m TT.

    Given the fluidity and relative disorganization of the group in cat 5 races, it seems as though riders work within their areobic zones untill a surge/breakaway happens when they then push up/beyond their LT or well beyond for sprints and then recover midstream.

    So, while in a 40m flat race (I live in Chicago) in what HR zone (and where in that zone) does one spend the bulk of their race time (low-mid-high aerobic, anaerobic)? In another situation, for say a flat 10m TT, should one maintain slightly below--at--or well above LT? Finally, how long should one ideally be able to maintain HR @ > LT?

    I'd appreciate any anecdotal answers from those with experience, like % of time in particular zones. I fully understand that racing is not a scripted or formulaic event, but it is technical and I am looking for ballpark answers to satisfy a fast fred looking to race someday.

    BTW: These questions may be answered in training books such as Friel's, and I have ordered it, but the more BF posts I read, the more these questions bug me.

    Thanks!
    gravity: it's not just a good idea, it's the law.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Richard Cranium's Avatar
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    Hey, there's never one "script" that every race follows. You pretty much "nailed" the description of how various effort levels will change.

    You might want to quit using the term "anaerobic endurance." I think what you mean to describe is Lactate Threshold. You are right, that he who can "tolerate" the longer period of effort above the Lactate Threshold will be ahead of those who can't.

  3. #3
    Senior Member slim_77's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Cranium
    You might want to quit using the term "anaerobic endurance." I think what you mean to describe is Lactate Threshold.
    Ok, but does that mean that there really is no endurance at or above LT other than shorter (less than 20 min) surges/bursts? And if this is the case, is one simply utilizing interval training type situations in a race?
    gravity: it's not just a good idea, it's the law.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Cranium
    You might want to quit using the term "anaerobic endurance." I think what you mean to describe is Lactate Threshold. You are right, that he who can "tolerate" the longer period of effort above the Lactate Threshold will be ahead of those who can't.
    Actually, I think anaerobic endurance isn't that bad if it's refering to how much work can be done above functional threshold. The more common term is anaerobic work capacity (AWC) as defined through the Monod Critical Power Paradigm. This model basically breaks performance into two components: the aerobic part which can be maintained for a very long time (functional threshold), and the anaerobic part which has as an upper limit the total work that can be performed anaerobically (AWC). It's explained pretty well here: http://www.velo-fit.com/articles/critical-power.pdf

  5. #5
    Senior Member Richard Cranium's Avatar
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    And if this is the case, is one simply utilizing interval training type situations in a race?
    No, that's just what it feels like.

    Typically the term "endurance" is more closely defined as longer-term sustainable activities. "Tolerance" is the term used do describe the ability to sustain, or "maintain" uncomfortable effort levels in the short term.

    Essentially most of the goals of race-training involve either being able to mentally tolerate high levels of lactate for increasing periods of time or "training the body" to clear lactate from the body by adapting metabolic pathways that utilize lactate for energy.

    This is done by exercising for periods of time that create excess lactate, or increasing the length of periods of activity right at the level of where the body uses all the lactate it creates.

    That's all there is to it. Go train and become Lance Armstrong......

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